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"Alabama (AL)"

Letter from Polly M. Williams to Whom it May Concern

Sunday, January 29, 1967

Polly Williams, a former counselor of the Neighborhood Youth Corps, requests a full investigation of its director, Mr. Pace. Mrs. Williams requested a sick leave while undergoing surgery, yet later discovered that her request had counted as vacation time. She discusses numerous orders she received from Mr. Pace that negatively impacted her health and her recovery from surgery. She believes that she is a victim of racial discrimination in the workplace.

Faith and Reason

Dr. King references Albert Knudson's "The Doctrine of God."

Letter from Benjamin E. Mays to MLK

Saturday, June 30, 1962

Benjamin E. Mays, President of Morehouse College, expresses his gratitude for the copy of the letter Dr. King sent to the editor of The Christian Century. Mays also inquires about the response of the editor.

Letter from Joan Daves Requesting the Table of Contents for "Where Do We Go From Here"

Monday, December 19, 1966

Here Joan Daves requests a table of contents for Dr. King's "Where Do We Go From Here" in order to write a description for the catalog.

Letter from MLK to Beatrice Rosselll

Wednesday, September 23, 1964

Dr. King takes an opportunity to express gratitude for Beatrice Rossell's support to the civil rights movement. He addresses her inquiry regarding his activities with the Highlander Folk School and possible Communist ties. Rossell received a picture of Dr. King at Highlander and the caption addressed him as a Communist.

Dr. King on Vietnam: Demagogic Tactics

Brigadier General S. L. A. Marshall critiques Dr. King's Vietnam stance and asserts that Dr. King's position undermines his work and credibility as a civil rights leader.

MLK Flyer: "Integrated Bus Suggestions"

Wednesday, December 19, 1956

In this document, Dr. King and the Reverend W.J. Powell list under "The Montgomery Improvement Association" guidelines to mitigate potential conflicts in the transition to integrated buses. The principle of nonviolence is present throughout the document.

Unfair to Put Blame on Mississippi Poor

This editorial in the Tupelo (MS) Daily Journal claims it is unfair to attribute the proposed Poor People's Campaign in Washington, D.C. to poor Mississippians, who are uneducated and have no knowledge of Congress or how to mount a massive protest. The piece takes both Dr. King and Stokely Carmichael to task for suggesting that the wheels of government be ground to a stop until their demands are met.

Telegram from MLK to Richard Maguire of the DNC

Dr. King informs Richard Maguire of the Democratic National Committee that he is unable to accept an invitation to the pre-inaugural dinner.

Postcard From Jesse Jackson to MLK

Jesse Jackson doubts that Dr. King will be able to bring God to Albany, Georgia.

Letter from Yousuf Karsh to MLK

Wednesday, October 21, 1964

Yousuf Karsh congratulates Dr. King on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize Award. In addition, Mr. Karsh informs Dr. King that his wife attended Antioch College at the same time as Mrs. King.

Letter from Claude Leman to MLK

Friday, August 27, 1965

Claude Leman, Chairman of the University Model United Nations, invites Dr. King to speak at a Model United Nations Seminar in Montreal, Canada.

Coretta's Personal Story

This telegram, dictated to Charles L. Sanders on the way back from the Nobel Peace Prize Award ceremony, contains Mrs. Coretta Scott King's sentimental narrative of her acclaimed relationship with Dr. King. Revealing details that range from their meeting in 1951 through twelve years of marriage, Mrs. King admits she was immediately smitten by Dr.

Notecard regarding science

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines his views on science.This is an example of one of many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books, and other publications, definitions, and bible verses.

Letter from Dora McDonald to David Mays

Tuesday, October 22, 1963

On behalf of Dr. King, Dora E. McDonald responds to David Mays of Austin Peay State College in Clarksville, Tennessee. As requested, she encloses a copy of a speech Dr. King gave in Washington. Ms. McDonald also informs that a recording of the speech is available for purchase from the Council for United Civil Rights Leadership.

Rejection Letter to Nusas Journal

Monday, May 24, 1965

Dr. King informs the editor of Nusas Journal that he will not be able to contribute an article.

Art

Dr. King describes art as "alleviating the ills of life."

Letter from Vivian S. Florence to MLK

Sunday, November 10, 1963

Ms. Florence informs Dr. King she has sent two other letters to the SCLC, both of which included contributions from the United Mine Workers of America. She expresses concern regarding mail tampering due to Dr. King's notoriety.

Letter from MLK to Agnes Mack

Saturday, December 10, 0196

Dr. King sends Agnes Mack a form to complete so that she may receive a copy of the "I have a Dream" speech.

Letter from SNCC Chairman John Lewis to William Shawn

Thursday, April 22, 1965

John Lewis, Chairman of SNCC, responds to a recent article in "The New Yorker." He provides a number of corrections to the article and also explains who should be considered official spokespersons for SNCC.

Letter from Roland de Corneille to MLK

Friday, September 10, 1965

Rev. Roland de Corneille informs Dr. King that he has been invited by the International Teach-In Committee at the University of Toronto to participate in a program featuring representatives from Vietnam.

People to People: The Law is Majestic

Saturday, July 31, 1965

Dr. King pays homage to the numerous lawyers of the Civil Rights Movement and asserts that the one unifying belief among lawyers is the idea that "law is majestic and the judicial process is supreme." Dr. King supports this claim with a story about his Negro lawyers successfully winning a case in Birmingham with an all-white jury.

Letter from C. Alexander Brown to MLK

Wednesday, January 31, 1968

C. Alexander Brown requests that Dr. King and the SCLC conduct an investigation on the conditions of black prisoners in American jails. After reading about cruel conditions in an Arkansas prison, Brown questions how many innocent black prisoners are confined.

God - II Kings

Dr. King cites II Kings 5:15 as as affirmation of monotheism.

Letter from Marie Brookter to MLK

Friday, February 9, 1968

Marie Brookter offers Dr. King "information as to the needs of the Poor" in preparation for the upcoming March of Poor People to Washington.

Letter from MLK to Ms. Susan Stauffer

Thursday, August 20, 1964

Dr. King expresses his deep appreciation to Susan Stauffer for her contribution to the SCLC. He states, "such moral and financial support are of inestimable value for the continuance of our humble efforts."

Cooperative/Noble Competition

Dr. King writes a sermon on the topic "Cooperative Competition." King utilizes the biblical text deriving from Luke chapter 22 verse 24, which expresses how Jesus views competition. According to the text, Jesus thinks that competition is good as long as an individual competes with humility and serving others.

Letter from Jack Thayer to Mrs. King

Friday, January 19, 1968

Jack Thayer, of KLAC Radio, writes to Mrs. King thanking her for a recent guest appearance on "Two-Way Radio," in Southern California.

Telegram to MLK from Various Organizational Leaders

Monday, June 19, 1967

Several organizational leaders request that Dr. King join them in Washington, D.C. for an event in which Ambassador Galbraith will address a luncheon with a "major statement on Vietnam."

Civil Rights and Vietnam

An avid supporter urges Dr. King to divert his attention to the War in Vietnam. He asserts "This war will force Chinese and Russian to interfere and may further expand into thermonuclear war..."