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"Alabama (AL)"

"We're Here Because We're Tired"

Civil rights leader Andrew Young expresses the collective frustration of the African-American community concerning employment discrimination, housing segregation, and the welfare system.

Homeric Problem

Dr. King briefly outlines the problem surrounding the work of the Greek poet Homer. The note card references the view of German scholar and critic Friedrich August Wolf and documents two primary theories regarding Homeric literature.

Letter from Hugh Gloster to MLK

Tuesday, October 24, 1967

Hugh Gloster, President of Morehouse College, sends a copy of the brochure "The Negro & Higher Education In The South", to Dr. King. He also mentions the Morehouse Board of Trustees meeting, in New York, Nov. 9th.

Substance

Dr. King records some thoughts on the topic "substance," "a term used to signify that which is sought when philosophers investigate the primary being of things."

Letter from Benjamin E. Mays to Miss Dora McDonald

Monday, June 5, 1967

In this document, President of Morehouse College, Benjamin E. Mays writes to Dora McDonald regarding receipt of a check. Mays also discusses the role he played in bringing McDonald to Atlanta.

Card from the English Family

The English Family sends a card that lists words of encouragement for each day of the week.

The Negotiating Committee and Housing

Thursday, May 12, 1966

This statement by the Negotiation Committee lists several improvements made to an African American housing community. The Committee explains that the changes are only on a trial basis and therefore, the community will still picket until permanent changes are made.

Statement on Nonviolence in the South

Thursday, January 10, 1957

This document is a statement addressing the need to combat the growing violence between southern Caucasian Americans and African Americans.

Letter from Wesley Hotchkiss to Associates of the Citizen Education Project

Wednesday, September 7, 1966

Mr. Hotchkiss, the General Secretary of the AMA and primary UCBHM representative for the CEP, writes employees to clear up confusion regarding the administrative structure of the CEP. He informs employees that the the CEP is administered by the UCBHM stating, "When staff are confused about their employer it usually means they are confused about their objectives." The organization's most important objective, Mr. Hotchkiss asserts, is to mobilize individuals who have been trained under the CEP to focus the skills they have acquired on community development.

Letter from Larry Oaks to SCLC

Monday, April 20, 1964

A student from the University of Alabama requests information from the SCLC for a course on race relations.

MLK on the New York Riots

Monday, July 27, 1964

Dr. King discusses the recent riots that occurred in New York. While some people would like to place the blame on violent blacks, King asserts that one should examine the real issues behind the violence and riots. King states that many blacks feel they will never gain equality in housing, employment, or education, which is why they react violently.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

Sunday, April 9, 1967

In this letter addressed to Rev. Martin "Coon" King, the writer--who does not identify himself-- maintains Dr. King is "damag[ing]...the negroes [sic] cause" by focusing on giving them "handouts," as opposed to "improv[ing] their morals."

Evil (Psalm)

Dr. King notes that Psalm 73 raises the question of why the wicked prosper and suggests that the only solution for the mystery of evil is faith.

Royalty Statement from J. Campe to MLK Regarding Harper and Row

Monday, April 10, 1967

J. Campe informs Dr. King of the deductions for his royalty check from Harper and Row.

Letter from Emily Barton Arrabee to MLK

Sunday, January 20, 1963

Ms. Arrabee sends a check to Dr. King not for the SCLC, but for Dr. and Mrs. King to use to treat themselves in some way. Arrabee suggests a book, a new record or dinner together. The check is a token of her respect and admiration for both Dr. and Mrs. King.

Letter from Ms. Joan Daves to Mr. Gosta Dahl

Thursday, June 11, 1964

In this letter, dated June 11, 1964 to Mr. Gosta Dahl, Joan Daves expresses the importance of "Why We Can't Wait" and why they feel it is a "...potentially more successful" work than Dr. King's other two books. Accordingly, they request minimum advance and royalty schedules. She asks that Mr. Dahl check with the Swedish publishers to see if they would raise their offer, for the use of Dr. King's work.

Letter from MLK to Dr. Ernest J. Foster

Saturday, July 25, 1964

Dr. King thanks Dr. Ernest Foster for his financial contribution to the SCLC. He informs Dr. Foster of the distribution of the proceeds from a previous reception and discusses the significance of supporters to the movement. Dr. King also encloses a copy of his recent book, "Why We Can't Wait."

Letter from O. O. Rabb to MLK

Monday, March 27, 1967

This note and newspaper clipping from O.O. Robb was addressed to "The Right Reverend Martin Luther King, Pastor & Civil Rights Agitator." Robb assures Dr. King that he would, in fact, find supporters, "for there are many soft-headed wild-eyed people who have a soft heart and no brains who will follow." Robb contines that President Johnson's Great Society and War on Poverty must go on and ends that Dr. King and his supporters will get their reward - a prison cell.

My Dream

Dr. King writes an article entitled "My Dream," which discusses his campaign to "wage war on the big city ghetto." King visits several slums across the North, and expresses his sentiments regarding the infamous slum conditions.

Letter from MLK to Beatrice Rosselll

Wednesday, September 23, 1964

Dr. King takes an opportunity to express gratitude for Beatrice Rossell's support to the civil rights movement. He addresses her inquiry regarding his activities with the Highlander Folk School and possible Communist ties. Rossell received a picture of Dr. King at Highlander and the caption addressed him as a Communist.

Telegram from Oeberg Ruden Abrahamsson to MLK

Thursday, October 15, 1964

The Baptist Union of Sweden congratulates Dr. King on winning the Nobel Peace Prize. The group also invites Dr. King to Sweden.

Those Who Fail To Speak

Saturday, June 5, 1965

Dr. King discusses the stagnant progress of desegregation despite the fact that a decade has passed since the Supreme Court's ruling on Brown v. Board of Education.

Letter from Alfred K. Barr to MLK

Tuesday, February 22, 1966

Alfred Barr, of the Cosmopolitan Club of the University of Georgia Athens, invites Dr. King to speak at their campus, citing the fact that Dr. King was the only Nobel Prize winner from Georgia.

Letter from Bob Bodie to MLK

Tuesday, March 26, 1968

Bob Bodie, Choice '68 Chairman at John Brown University, asks Dr. King to send materials about himself for the National Collegiate Presidential Primary. Bodie requests posters, buttons and literature to acquaint the students with Dr. King.

Dr. King Sermon Outline

Dr. King prepares notes for the sermon "Three Levels of Fellowship" deriving from 1st Corinthians 1:2, 9.

Letter from Linda Witt to MLK

Thursday, November 30, 1967

Linda Witt, who is conducting research for a school project, asks Dr. King questions about his involvement in the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Ms. Joan Daves to Ms. Dora McDonald Regarding Samples

Thursday, June 25, 1964

In this letter, Ms. Daves, Dr. King's literary agent, is asking Ms. McDonald if Dr. King wants to see copies of the promotion for his book's paperback edition.

Can You Live Where You Want to Live?

George and Eunice Grier write regarding the topic "Can you live where you want to live?" This article discusses discrimination and segregation in housing. The Griers assert that integration in jobs and public places is advancing, but segregation in housing still plagues many people in America.

Seminar in Social Philosophy Notes

Dr. King records notes for his Seminar in Social Philosophy course. These notes consist of readings by and related to ancient Greek philosophers Plato and Aristotle.

Letter from Gunter Kohlhaw to MLK

Friday, October 14, 1966

Dr. Gunter B. Kohlhaw shares the memorable experience of hearing Dr. King deliver a sermon while attending Sunday service at Ebenezer Baptist Church. Kohlhaw also requests copies of Dr. King's collection of sermons.