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Letter from Gerald Feffer to MLK

Thursday, October 17, 1963

Gerald Feffer of Lehigh University invites Dr. king to speak at the university in the near future.

"The Drum Major Instinct" Ebenezer Baptist Church

Sunday, February 4, 1968

The Drum Major Instinct, a sermon delivered by Dr. King at the Atlanta Ebenezer Baptist Church, frames the “instinct” as being responsible for the social ills of the world. Dr. King proclaims that racial inequality in America and the war in Vietnam are the result of nations engaging in a “bitter colossal contest for supremacy.” He suggests that the only way to end this “suicidal thrust” is to abide by an altered definition of the instinct – the definition of Jesus Christ.

Letter from J. B. Hamilton to MLK

Tuesday, March 26, 1963

J. B. Hamilton expresses gratitude for Dr. King's visit to the Mount Zion Baptist Church in Charlottesville, Virginia.

Robert L. Cope

Dr. King references Robert L. Cope’s article “Nature and/or Grace.”

Dignity Is the Best Way

Wednesday, November 1, 1967

The Atlanta Constitution writes about Dr. King serving a five day sentence for contempt of court in Birmingham.

Letter from SNCC Executive Committee to MLK

Sunday, March 7, 1965

John Lewis and Silas Norman of SNCC write Dr. King to address their organization's grievances with the SCLC, specifically the SCLC's lack of cooperation in the Selma Voting Rights campaign. Members of SNCC state their disagreement with the march planned for March 7, 1965 because "the objectives of the march do not justify the danger and the resources involved." Lewis and Norman request a meeting with Dr. King to discuss reconciliation between SNCC and the SCLC.

Letter from Wesley Hotchkiss to Associates of the Citizen Education Project

Wednesday, September 7, 1966

Mr. Hotchkiss, the General Secretary of the AMA and primary UCBHM representative for the CEP, writes employees to clear up confusion regarding the administrative structure of the CEP. He informs employees that the the CEP is administered by the UCBHM stating, "When staff are confused about their employer it usually means they are confused about their objectives." The organization's most important objective, Mr. Hotchkiss asserts, is to mobilize individuals who have been trained under the CEP to focus the skills they have acquired on community development.

Letter From Bernard Lafayette, Jr. to Dennis Brunn

Thursday, January 25, 1968

This is a memorandum thanking Mr. Brunn for his letter of support for the labor unions.

Telegram from Thomas Kilgore to MLK

Thomas Kilgore, on behalf of Friendship Baptist Church, offers support to Dr. King concerning the downfall of discrimination and segregation.

Letter from the Speakers Bureau to MLK

Thursday, March 28, 1968

The Speakers Bureau writes Dr. King as they are preparing to publish a new edition of the Speakers Booklet for 1968-69. They request Dr. King's biography, topics of discussion, a recent photo, and ask his general availability.

Letter of Resignation Rachel Davis DuBois to MLK

Wednesday, November 2, 1966

Rachel Davis DuBois resigns from the staff of SCLC to help the organization during a time of financial difficulties. Dr. DuBois offers her services in the future whenever needed without compensation.

The Role of the Church

Dr. King expresses how ineffective the Emancipation Proclamation has truly been on the Civil Rights Movement.

Telegram from Roselle Siegal to MLK

Sunday, April 16, 1967

Roselle Siegal extends her appreciation and moral support of Dr. King by means of this Western Union telegram.

Letter from Dr. Benjamin E.Mays to William J. Trent, Jr.

Friday, January 31, 1964

In this letter, Benjamin E. Mays is notifying William Trent that Dr. King will meet with John D. Rockefellar, III at his office on Feburary 6. What the meeting is about is not specified in the letter.

Auguste Comte

Dr. King writes of Comte's views of the relationship between the theological, the metaphysical and the scientific worlds.

The Inauguration of Hugh Morris Gloster

This program commemorates the inauguration of Hugh Morris Gloster as the seventh president of Morehouse College.

Letter from Frederic C. Smedley to MLK

Monday, August 14, 1967

Frederic C. Smedley, a lawyer and peace activists, presents Dr. King with a proposed plan aimed at applying pressure on President Johnson and other political leaders to end the war in Vietnam. The plan includes such actions as bombarding Congress with letters, demanding that President Johnson resign, and urging Republicans to nominate a ticket with candidates in support of an anti-Vietnam war policy. If none of the suggestions are effective, Smedley encourages a push for an independent ticket.

Memo from Joan Daves to MLK

Thursday, May 28, 1964

In this memo, Joan Daves informs Dr. King, along with others, that the Detroit News will run installments for "Why We Cant Wait." They are also told that the copyright will be in Dr. King's name and that credit will be given to Harper and NAL.

Civil Rights and Vietnam

An avid supporter urges Dr. King to divert his attention to the War in Vietnam. He asserts "This war will force Chinese and Russian to interfere and may further expand into thermonuclear war..."

Letter of White Opposition to MLK

Tuesday, August 1, 1967

A gentleman by the name of David writes to Dr. King expressing his belief that segregation is the "best way to avoid dating, dancing, sex and marriage" between Negroes and whites.

Listings of scholarship applicants of March 1967

Document titled Russell Bull Scholarship Applications March 1967. The list reads of applicants who are eligible for scholarships .

Letter from MLK's Secretary to Ralph and Juanita Abernathy

Wednesday, November 18, 1964

Dr. King's secretary sends Ralph and Juanita Abernathy information regarding the trip to Oslo, Norway for the month of December, 1964.

Symbolic Mountains

On the stationary of the Waldorf-Astoria hotel in New York, Dr. King outlines a sermon entitled "Symbolic Mountains." These include the mountains of ethical relations, practical materialism, indifference concerning poverty, and racial segregation.

Letter from MLK to Reverend Charles R. Bell Jr. about Beating of a Prisoner

Tuesday, December 13, 1966

In this correspondence, Dr. King offers thanks to Rev. Bell for his letter about the "horrible beating" of a Negro prisoner in Wetumpka, Alabama.

Letter from Frank J. Pastor to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

This letter from Frank Pastor was written to Mrs. King the day after Dr. King’s assassination.

The Dan Smoot Report: Communism in the Civil Rights Movement

Monday, June 1, 1964

This issue of the Dan Smoot Report explores communism in the Civil Rights Movement. He shows how Dr. King and his secretary, Bayard Rustin, are Communist personalities involved in the Civil Rights Movement.

Handwritten Note from Harry Wachtel to Dora McDonald

Harry Wachtel, confidant and legal counsel to Dr. King, writes a note to Dora McDonald referencing an enclosure intended for Dr. King.

Poor People's Campaign Food Contribution List

This document is a list of the preliminary food contributions for the SCLC's Poor People's Campaign.

Letter from Janet Somerville to MLK

Janet Somerville writes to Dr. King, expressing how he has been a renewal of hope for her. She also thanks Dr. King, his family and the SCLC for their hospitality during her visit to Atlanta.

Press Conference on Chicago Movement

Wednesday, July 7, 1965

Dr. King shares his acceptance of the invitation to spend some time in Chicago. During his time in Chicago, Dr. King and other SCLC leaders plan to assist local civil rights organizations in organizing rallies throughout the city.