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Handwriiten Notecard Regarding Freedom

This notecard written by Dr. Martin Luther King, cites a quote, of Tillich, regarding freedom.

Letter from Carmen Baptista to MLK

Monday, December 27, 1965

Carmen Baptista of Caracas, Venezuela writes Dr. King after reading his letter in the Saturday Review. She expresses her concern with the struggle for civil rights and since she is unable to make a monetary donation, she sends Dr. King a recording of a song she composed in honor of the freedom workers called "Coming Down the Road."

Jesus: Divinity and Missions

In this series of note cards, Dr. King documents various biblical passages from the New Testament that discuss Jesus' divinity. The passages are abbreviated and listed with their biblical citations.

The Crisis - NAACP 50 Years - Freedom Civil Rights Progress

North Carolina (NC), New York, NY, New York (NY), Georgia (GA), Tennessee (TN), Arkansas (AR), National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), United Press International, United States Federal Housing Administration., NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund, American Federation of Labor and Congress of Industrial Organizations (AFL-CIO), National Urban League, Young Men's Christian Association (YMCA), Syracuse University, Tuskegee Institute, United States Supreme Court, United States. Congress, Morehouse College (Atlanta, GA), Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc., North Carolina (NC), New York, NY, New York (NY), New Jersey (NJ), Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), SOUTH AFRICA, Little Rock, AR, Louisiana (LA), Virginia (VA), New Orleans, LA, Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS), Texas (TX), South Carolina (SC), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Tennessee (TN), Des Moines, IA, New Hampshire (NH), Oklahoma (OK), Michigan (MI), KENYA, Alabama (AL)

This 1959 issue of The Crisis celebrates the 50th anniversary of the NAACP. The contents include events that vary from legislation cases to African-American accomplishments relevant to the time.

Support Letter to MLK

Saturday, August 6, 1966
INDIA, Alabama (AL)

The author of this letter is sending Dr. King a book entitiled 'Satyagraha in South Africa' by Mahatma Gandhi. The book holds similarities to Dr. King's book 'Stride Towards Freedom'. The author of the letter describes how both books have provided inspiration to those who believe in the philosophy of non-violence.

Letter from Leon Martin to MLK

Michigan (MI)

Educator Leon Martin expresses his dissatisfaction with individuals that are silent about civil rights for Negroes. He states that a lot of people do not care about civil right until it affects them personally. He also discusses the Christian church's continual support of the "status quo". He encloses a contribution on behalf of he and his wife and sends Dr. King his prayers and support.

Hunger U.S.A.

Mississippi (MS), GEORGIA, Texas (TX), South Carolina (SC), Kentucky (KY)

This pamphlet outlines the necessity for intervention programs, like the National Council of Negro Women's pilot program, to combat the issue of malnutrition within the African American community.

Letter from Clarence E. Duffy to MLK

Tuesday, May 16, 1967

Rev. Duffy expresses his religious and political concerns with Dr. King as he considers a potential presidential campaign in 1968.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dora McDonald

Friday, May 1, 1964

In this letter Joan Daves informs Ms. Dora McDonald that all matters pertaining to the published works of Dr. King must pass through her office, as she is the literary agent for Dr. King.

Telegram from Melvin Arnold to MLK

Monday, November 26, 1962
New York (NY), New York, NY

Melvin Arnold asks Dr. King to approve either "The Strength to Love" or "The Cost of Love" as the title of Dr. King's book.

SCLC's Dr. King Ranked by Negroes as Most Influential Leader

Tuesday, January 9, 1968
New York, NY, Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

This 1968 SCLC news release relays that Dr. King has been identified "as the most influential Negro leader in America today." Dr. King had less than a hundred days before that influence would cost him his life.

Press Release from the Southern Conference Educational Fund, Inc.

Wednesday, November 24, 1965
Tennessee (TN), New Orleans, LA, Washington, D.C.

The Southern Conference Educational Fund, Inc. informs supporters about the recent attacks on civil rights groups located in Knoxville, Tennessee.

Out of Segregation's Long Night

Montgomery, AL, Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Alabama (AL)

Dr. King addresses the crisis of race relations in America by asserting that there would not be a crisis if blacks accepted inferiority and injustice. He also discusses the physical and spiritual harm that segregation and slavery has caused for blacks and the effect that violence has on the community. Dr. King closes with remarks regarding nonviolence and what it truly represents.

Telegram from Carole Hoover to MLK

Thursday, November 2, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Birmingham, AL, Georgia (GA), Alabama (AL)

Carole Hoover offers encouragement to Dr.King while he is incarcerated in Birmingham.

Letter from the Holy Name College to MLK

Friday, October 11, 1963
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

The Holy Name College requests Dr. King's written contribution for a new section in their publication entitled Interest Magazine. Interest Magazine is an international publication dedicated to the understanding and appreciation of theology. Dr. King has been selected to focus on the issue regarding Christianity and the American Negro. The college provides Dr. King with the restrictions of his essay and assures him that they will print his written work without editing for authenticity.

Letter from Martin Kessler to MLK

Thursday, November 10, 1966
New York (NY), New York, NY, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, CHINA, SOUTH AFRICA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Washington, D.C., VIETNAM, Massachusetts (MA), Boston, MA, Maryland (MD), Baltimore, MD, CANADA

Martin Kessler sends Dr. King an article by Daniel P. Moynihan entitled "Is There Really an Urban Crisis?" Moynihan addresses issues of the economic and social conditions in America in the interview with Challenge Magazine.

Memo from Dora McDonald to MLK

Tuesday, December 5, 1967
Selma, AL, Birmingham, AL, St. Augustine, FL, Cleveland, OH, Boston, MA, Montgomery, AL, Atlanta, GA, New Jersey (NJ), New York (NY), Illinois (IL), CONGO / ZAIRE, CANADA

Miss Dora McDonald provides Dr. King with a synopsis of updates regarding invitations and correspondences. She notifies Dr. King of the Ann Morris School of Arts attendance at Ebenezer Baptist Church, Eugene Carson Blake's response to Dr. King's acceptance to speak, and V. M. Herron requests of 300 "Black is Beautiful" pamphlets. In addition, she informs Dr. King of the recent telephone calls from various individuals.

Letter from Frank Jones to MLK

Tuesday, August 14, 1962
Atlanta, GA, Albany, GA

Reverend Frank Jones sends Dr. King a letter expressing his concern about the recent occurrences in Albany, Georgia.

Letter from Emma Lazarus Federation of Jewish Women's Clubs to SCLC

Friday, December 30, 1966
New York, NY

June Gordon, Executive Director of Emma Lazarus Federation of Jewish Women's Clubs, encloses a check in the amount of $100. She also encloses material listing activities her organization has initiated.

Letter From Kivie Kaplan to MLK

Sunday, February 5, 1967
Florida (FL), JAMAICA, New York (NY)

In this letter, Mr. Kaplan thanks "Coretta and Martin" for their cards and acknowledges the preparation of Dr. King's fourth book.

News from Southern Conference Educational Fund

Monday, October 31, 1966
Louisville, KY, Washington, D.C., Birmingham, AL, Cincinnati, OH, Tennessee (TN), West Virginia (WV), Alabama (AL), Louisiana (LA), Kentucky (KY)

The SCEF Executive Board asserts that the attack of black power is injuring the plight of democracy in the United States. The SCEF board declared "the idea of black power has a long and honorable history but it is currently being misrepresented in the news media in the United States."

Christianity and Civilization

Dr. King records a quote from Arnold J. Toynbee's "Civilization on Trial" and the view that "religious progress comes through the birth and death of civilization."

Letter from Mrs. Cyrus Eaton to MLK

Tuesday, April 18, 1967
Ohio (OH)

In this letter, Mrs. Eaton wrote this letter praising Dr. King for his remarks on Face the Nation. Mrs. Eaton states that Dr. King is indebted to him for always voicing his wisdom.

Letter from Bayard Rustin to MLK

Friday, July 7, 1967
Cleveland, OH

Bayard Rustin informs Dr. King that Sydney Vincent, the Executive Director of the Jewish Community Federation of Cleveland, would like to gather the major Jewish organizational leaders to discuss Dr. King's work in Cleveland, Ohio.

Letter from MLK to E. D. Johnson

Monday, April 30, 1962
Illinois (IL)

Dr. King responds to E. D. Johnson's letter expressing appreciation for encouragement by providing knowledge regarding the arrogance of Mr. Johnson's son. Dr. King stresses the importance of valuing the internal factors of self-respect, integrity and selflessness, opposed to the external factors of color, skin and wealth.

Tribute to Dr. King by Rev. Joseph L. Roberts

Friday, April 5, 1968
Detroit, MI

In this document, Rev. Joseph L. Roberts, Presiding Elder for the West Detroit District of the AME church, delivered this profound tribute to Dr. King, the day after his assassination.

An Interview With MLK

Atlanta, GA, Montgomery, AL, New York (NY), Birmingham, AL, Boston, MA

A young student from Towns Elementary School in Atlanta interviews Dr. King for a class assignment. The student asks important questions relating to Dr. King's family background, career in ministry and his influence in the civil rights movement. When asked about being the recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize, Dr. King responds by saying, "It is more of a tribute to the thousands of gallant people who have participated in the struggle for equality, and who have done it in a peaceful, courageous manner."

Letter from Bea Subt to MLK

Saturday, April 22, 1967

The author sends Dr. King a letter informing him that she is withdrawing her assistance toward civil rights workers since he has decided to be a politician, military leader and diplomat. She also questions how he can fight for equal rights in a country that's not worth protecting from the communists.

Letter to Ralph Abernathy Offering Suggestions

Tuesday, April 30, 1968

A supporter of the civil rights movement writes this letter to Reverend Abernathy. It is suggested that the Negro leaders of the civil rights movement consider the voting power of senior citizens. In order to get "a massive single solid vote bloc" it would be advantageous to also include the poor population. With this amount of supporters, the writer believes it would be possible to sustain a presidential candidacy. The author continues by telling Abernathy of Russia's economic goal.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Ralph Kates

Wednesday, October 4, 1967
Philadelphia, PA

Dora McDonald writes Ralph Kates on behalf of Dr. King accepting their invitation to visit St. Joseph College.