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Letter from Robert Lee King to MLK

Sunday, April 14, 1963
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

A member of Ebenezer Baptist Church expresses concern over Dr. King's imprisonment in the Birmingham Jail. Robert Lee King also shares his wish that he could physically be in jail as well to aid in the "freedom of all Americans." Though nothing in the letter has been blocked out, the letter does contain a stamp of the word "censored."

Letter from Ms. Joan Daves to Mr. August Schou

Friday, November 20, 1964
New York, NY

In this letter Ms. Daves addresses Mr. Schou's request to have copyright assignment to the speech which Dr King delivered at the University of Oslo, after receiving the Nobel Peace Prize. She stipulates to Mr. Schou's "first call" but stresses the importance of copyright protocol "after Oslo."

Letter from Marvin Caplan of Leadership Conference on Civil Rights

Wednesday, December 6, 1967
New York, NY, Washington, D.C.

In a letter to the heads of various organizations, Marvin Caplan encloses information regarding the Crime Control Bill that was sent to all members of the State Judiciary Committee. The enclosure is entitled "A New Threat to School Desegregation."

MLK Outline - "Beyond Condemnation"

This handwritten note of Dr. King's is one of many such notes and outlines he wrote in preparation for a speech or sermon. The body of this outline references the Biblical passage John 8:2-11.

Call to Action in Race Relations

Sunday, January 1, 1961

J. Oscar Lee and S. Garry Oniki draft a memorandum to outline the purpose, function and program emphases for the General Committee for the Department of Racial and Cultural Relations sponsored by the National Council of Churches.

Letter from Howard Moore Jr. to MLK

Tuesday, November 3, 1964

Mr. Moore, of the Atlanta law firm Hollowell, Ward, Moore & Alexander, congratulates Dr. King on receiving of the Nobel Peace Prize. He goes on to encourage Dr. King and the SCLC to "establish a full fledge non-sectarian four year college and graduate school."

Humanism (15th Century)

Dr. King reflects on a classical approach to learning.

Letter from MLK to Robert Wagner

Tuesday, March 3, 1964
New York, NY

Dr. King sends condolences to Mayor Robert Wagner consequent to his wife's death.

Life (Poem)

Dr. King writes down part of playwright and composer Sir Noël Coward’s song “Twentieth Century Blues.”

Telegram from Edythe Siceluff to MLK

Thursday, December 17, 1964
New York (NY), New Jersey (NJ)

Edythe Siceluff recalls her conversation with Dr. King in 1957 where they predicted he would become a prosperous world leader.

The Future of Integration

Friday, August 21, 1959
Wisconsin (WI)

Dr. King discusses the various forms of segregation and the corresponding legislative acts that affect African Americans at the National Convention of the Fellowship of Reconciliation. King also provides details of how he hopes integration will take place.

Telegram to Governor Carl Sanders

Georgia (GA)

The SCLC writes to Georgia Governor Carl Sanders regarding the murder of Andy Whatley in Americus, GA.

Letter from MLK to The Honorable John Sherman Cooper

Wednesday, June 24, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King writes Kentucky Senator John Sherman Cooper to commend his role in facilitating the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Edwin Fenton

Monday, July 10, 1967
Pittsburgh, PA, Pennsylvania (PA)

Ms. McDonald is responding to the letter requesting permission of the use of Dr. King's speeches. The permission was granted to the Carnegie Institute of Technology. If any other services were needed then SCLC would be at their disposal.

Letter from Frank Annunzio to MLK

Saturday, January 9, 1965
Washington, D.C., Illinois (IL), Mississippi (MS), Atlanta, GA

Frank Annunzio informs Dr. King that he appreciates his views on the Mississippi Delegation. Annunzio states that he voted to remove the seniority status of the Mississippi Congressmen "from their respective Committees."

Letter from George Fedak to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

George Fedak writes Mrs. King to express his sympathy for Dr. King's death.

Letter from John G. Hodgson to MLK

Thursday, August 4, 1966
Washington, D.C.

John G. Hudson requests that Dr. King use Hodgson Travel Service for an upcoming trip to the Holy Land.

Letter from Alma Szatmary to MLK

Tuesday, April 11, 1967
New Jersey (NJ), VIETNAM, SPAIN

Alma Szatmary writes Dr. King concerning his stance on the Vietnam war. Szatmary writes that it should be prohibited for Puerto Ricans and African Americans to serve as oppressors in Vietnam when they are the ones being oppressed here at home.

Letter of Support to MLK

Tuesday, January 18, 1966
Indiana (IN)

Alphia Ganaway and Katherine Oakley send a check as a token of appreciation following Dr. King's appearance in South Bend, Indiana three years earlier. A member of the NAACP and other civic organizations, Ganaway led the effort that brought Dr. King to South Bend on October 18th, 1963.

Letter from MLK to James M. Kangongoi

Monday, April 16, 1962
PUERTO RICO, KENYA

Dr. King writes Mr. James M. Kangongoi acknowledging the receipt of his letter and expressing how good it was to meet him in Puerto Rico.

Letter of White Opposition to MLK

Tuesday, August 1, 1967

A gentleman by the name of David writes to Dr. King expressing his belief that segregation is the "best way to avoid dating, dancing, sex and marriage" between Negroes and whites.

Letter from J. Campe to MLK Regarding "A Stride to Freedom"

Tuesday, April 4, 1967
New York, NY, GERMANY

In this letter, J. Campe encloses the German royalties, received from J.G. Onken, for Dr. King's "Stride Toward Freedom" German language edition.

Letter from Herbert Jones to MLK

Wednesday, June 5, 1963
Atlanta, GA, Philadelphia, PA, Birmingham, AL, Jackson, MS, Boston, MA

Mr. Jones informs Dr. King of a grassroots civil rights organization (STOP) that seeks to implement a "stay at home" protest nationwide. Mr. Jones seeks Dr. King's assistance to make that happen.

Letter from Nancy Fuentes to Coretta Scott King

Friday, April 5, 1968

Nancy Fuentes writes Mrs. King to express her condolences for Dr. King's death and extend her love to Mrs. King and her children.

Letter from Robert L. Green to Mr. James Harrison

Tuesday, November 28, 1967
California (CA), Atlanta, GA

The Chicago Adult Education Department provides the Behavior Research Laboratories with the needed funds to amend the budget for their contract. Robert L. Green provides Mr. James Harrison with the distribution location for this contribution.

Transcripts for Courses at Harvard University

Thursday, August 13, 1953
Cambridge, MA, Massachusetts (MA)

Lois Ryan forwards a transcript for two courses that Dr. King took while studying at Harvard University. These courses were Philosophy of Plate: Introductory and The Philosophy of Whitehead.

Lecture Tour Request from David Bilk to MLK

Wednesday, October 5, 1966
New York (NY), Montgomery, AL, New York, NY

David Bilk, representing the British National Union of Students, requests that Dr. King present a lecture series for the larger British Universities explaining the past, present, future of the Civil Rights Movement in the United States.

Letter from Ellen Silver to MLK

Massachusetts (MA)

Mrs. Silver writes to Dr. King to inform him that his "Letter from a Birmingham Jail" will be edited for the publication of the textbook "The Triple Revolution: Social Problems in Depth."

Letter from Thomas Maloney to Dora McDonald

Saturday, May 22, 1965
ITALY

Rev. Maloney thanks Miss McDonald for her assistance and the materials that she sent.

The Ben Bella Conversation

ALGERIA, CUBA, Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL), Albany, GA, Georgia (GA), Mississippi (MS), New York (NY), New York, NY

Dr. King summarizes his recent two-hour meeting with Premier Ahmed Ben Bella of the newly-formed Algerian Republic. He mentions that Ben Bella was intimately familiar with the details of the civil rights movement and repeatedly said or inferred that “we are brothers.” King states that “the battle of the Algerians against colonialism and the battle of the Negro against segregation is a common struggle.” There are international implications for the US if it doesn’t solve its human rights problem: the nation will become a second-rate power in the world.