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Letter from Wayne Blanks to MLK

New York (NY)

Wayne Blanks writes Dr. King in hopes that he will answer a question about the specific goals and standards he sets for Negroes in the US. Blanks is requesting this information for his advanced placement history assignment.

Letter from Barbara Patterson to MLK

Friday, March 15, 1968
Michigan (MI), Detroit, MI

Barbara Patterson writes Dr. King thanking him for the lecture at Grosse Pointe High School in Michigan. She also encloses a letter that was sent to the Michigan Chronicle. The letter pointed out how great of a lecture Dr. King gave which ended in a standing ovation and how it inspired those that listened.

The Southern Patriot: Today's Hero The Negro Child

New Orleans, LA

This column highlights the brave children who endured the hardships of hostile mobs as they blazed the trail for school integration.

Letter of Gratitude and Concern from Eulah M. Eubank to Charles R. Baker of IAD

Sunday, February 18, 1968
Washington, D.C., Virginia (VA)

In this letter Eulah Eubank points to an urgent situation. Hence, Eubank writes with the intention of receiving resources to continue the fight against injustice. Finally, she communicates her sustained commitment to volunteering with the Anti Defamation League and Open for Opinion via radio monitoring.


Dr. King quotes Jonathan Swift’s scathing assessment of man.

Mass Letter from Mr. Maurice A. Dawkins, OOEE

Tuesday, February 20, 1968
Washington, D.C.

This letter from Maurice A. Dawkins, a representative from the Office of Economic Opportunity, accompanies materials that encourage the reader to take action "in pledging to beat swords into plowshares," namely transferring funds spent in the Vietnam conflict to domestic endeavors.

Sermon at The Washington Cathedral

Sunday, March 31, 1968
New York (NY), INDIA, SOUTH AFRICA, Washington, D.C.

In a sermon written by Dr. King and addressed to an audience at the Washington Cathedral, the Reverend expounds upon the problem of poverty and war. In describing a projected human revolution, Dr. King states, "Somewhere we must come to see that human progress never rolls in on the wheels of inevitability." This is just one of the many passages in this inspirational sermon encouraging hope and freedom for all.

Letter from MLK to Charles E. Merrill, Jr.

Friday, November 4, 1966
Boston, MA, Massachusetts (MA)

Dr. King expresses appreciation for Mr. Merrill's contribution to the SCLC. He also states that he looks forward to seeing Mr. Merrill at the Morehouse College of Trustees meeting taking place the following week.

Moving to Another Mountain

Connecticut (CT), EGYPT, Massachusetts (MA), Alabama (AL), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, JORDAN

Wesleyan University publishes an edited transcript of a speech given by Dr. King in 1964. The publication is made in the aftermath of Dr. King's assassination.

Letter from Concerned Citizen to MLK

Tuesday, March 12, 1968
California (CA)

A citizen writes Dr. King to express their disagreement and distaste for his work within the Civil Rights Movement. The citizen believes that Dr. King's work promotes more hatred and violence in the nation.


In this set of notecards, Dr. King discusses "sin." Referencing Biblical verses of Psalms 53:2 and 53:3, he says that "these passages seem to be an explicit affirmation of the universality of sin."

Speaking Out

New York, NY

Dr. King discusses the roles of Civil Rights leaders. He states that leaders do not control crime but have the responsibility of maintaining discipline. Dr. King reminds his audience that the Negro was the creator of nonviolence.

Vietnamese Student's Appeal for Peace


This document reveals that a Vietnamese student burned herself as an appeal for peace. The document also states that some of the writings that she left behind have been translated.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dr. King Regarding The Critic in Chicago

Friday, April 7, 1967
Southern Christian Leadership Conference, New York (NY), Chicago, IL

In this letter, Joan Daves informs Dr. King about the only magazine commitment to-date with The Critic in Chicago.

Letter from Dean Florio to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

Dean Florio sends condolences to Mrs. King the day after Dr. King's assassination.

Letter from MLK to Rev. J. Frank Patch

Monday, January 25, 1965

Dr. King writes Reverend J. Frank Patch informing him that his schedule prevents him from accepting Patch's invitation to speak at the Baptist Union of Western Canada.

A Promising Day for the City of Selma

Selma, AL

In this handwritten public statement, the author addresses the Negro citizens of Selma, Alabama by commending their efforts of non-violence during a one-thousand person demonstration for equal voting rights.

Letter from Ruthe T. Sheffey to MLK

Thursday, November 9, 1967
Baltimore, MD

In this letter, Ms. Sheffey asks Dr. King's permission to use his "I Have a Dream" speech in her upcoming textbook, "Impressions in Asphalt." Ms. Sheffey is a faculty member at Morgan State College, who is working on a textbook of poetry and prose with coworker, Eugenia Collier.

Letter from Laurence V. Kirkpatrick to MLK

Wednesday, September 8, 1965
New York, NY, New York (NY), PUERTO RICO

Mr. Kirkpatrick thanks Dr. King for his address at the Assembly in Puerto Rico for the World Convention of Churches of Christ. He also encloses a monetary donation to care for his expenses and serve as an honorarium.

Letter from Dieter Pichowski to MLK

Tuesday, July 11, 1967

Mr. Pichowski, from East Germany, is in request of Dr. King's handwriting.

Correspondence from Maude L. Ballou to Miss Frehse - Apr 29, 1960

Friday, April 29, 1960
Illinois (IL)

Here Maude L. Ballou is responding to Miss Frehse letter concerning questions about MLK's book "Stride Towards Freedom." Miss Ballou states that MLK's time schedule is too full to respond to her questions.

Letter from Eugenia C. Gambaccini to Russian Delegate

Eugenia Gambaccini impresses his hope that Russia "will realize the justice and love that God as for man, especially for those who have a good will."

Letter from Leon Lowry to the King's

Saturday, December 8, 1962
Florida (FL), Atlanta, GA

A. Leon Lowry invites the Kings to speak at Beulah Baptist Institutional Church in Florida for their Men's and Women's services.

"We're Here Because We're Tired"

Washington, D.C.

Civil rights leader Andrew Young expresses the collective frustration of the African-American community concerning employment discrimination, housing segregation, and the welfare system.


Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Selma, AL, New York (NY), New York, NY

Dr. King defines nonviolence as a "sword" that attacks hatred by striking at the conscience and morality of man.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dora McDonald

Friday, May 1, 1964

In this letter Joan Daves informs Ms. Dora McDonald that all matters pertaining to the published works of Dr. King must pass through her office, as she is the literary agent for Dr. King.

Salem Baptist Church Worship Service Program

Sunday, September 11, 1960
Pennsylvania (PA)

Dr. King attends Salem Baptist Church in Jenkintown, Pennsylvania as a guest speaker.

March On Mississippi

Saturday, July 1, 1967
Mississippi (MS)

Florence Fyall describes a scene of violence on peaceful demonstrators in her poem entitled March On Mississippi."

Letter from Congressman James Roosevelt to MLK

Tuesday, February 25, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Representative James Roosevelt thanks Dr. King for his words regarding Roosevelt's contribution to the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Handwritten Draft Letter from MLK

Dr. King expresses his gratitude for the generous contribution made by Mr. Hunter and addresses questions that were asked in a previous letter.