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Royalty Statement from Harper & Row Publishers

Here Harper and Row Publishers itemize the royalties from Dr. King's "Stride Toward Freedom" for a total of $689.44.

Telegram to Mrs. J. Tower from John Howard Griffen

Thursday, June 11, 1964
Texas (TX)

This telegram documents Griffen's commentary on one of Dr. King's publications.

God (His Existence: Psalms)

Dr. King references the Old Testament biblical Book of Psalms regarding God's existence.

Letter from Harriet Meyers to Benjamin Nelson

Thursday, December 15, 1966
Chicago, IL, London, England, Illinois (IL)

Ms. Meyers writes to Judge Nelson dissatisfied with the way he conducts trials, especially in her situation of a malpractice suit. She requests plastic surgery to correct the erroneous surgery.

Sin

Dr. King writes about sin, according to Jeremiah 31: 29, 30.

Congratulatory Letter from MLK to Edward T. Graham

Friday, May 19, 1967
Florida (FL)

In this letter, Dr. King praises the Miami figure's leadership and impact on the local community, Mt. Zion Baptist Church, and the state of Florida.

The Martin Luther King Column (1)

Montgomery, AL

Dr. King discusses the accomplishments of the Montgomery bus boycott, the challenges Negros will face, and the leadership skills of Ralph Abernathy.

The Danger of A Little Progress

Monday, February 3, 1964
Atlanta, GA, New York (NY)

This focuses on the issue of short term progress within the Civil Rights Movement because it does not offer long term lasting solutions.

Original Sin

Dr. King records his views regarding the doctrine of original sin.

Letter from SNCC Chairman John Lewis to William Shawn

Thursday, April 22, 1965
New York, NY, Selma, AL, Atlanta, GA

John Lewis, Chairman of SNCC, responds to a recent article in "The New Yorker." He provides a number of corrections to the article and also explains who should be considered official spokespersons for SNCC.

Invitation from Haile Selassie I to MLK

ETHIOPIA

Haile Selassie I, emperor of Ethiopia, invites Dr. King to his birthday anniversary at the Shoreham Hotel.

Letter from Samuel W. Williams to MLK

Wednesday, February 15, 1956
Montgomery, AL, Atlanta, GA

In this letter, Rev. Samuel W. Williams, Pastor of Friendship Baptist Church, offers encouraging words to Dr. King.

Letter from Leonard Newell to MLK

Friday, March 1, 1968
New Hampshire (NH), San Francisco, CA, Michigan (MI), Brooklyn, NY

Leonard A. Newell writes to Dr. King to ask for his opinion about the pursuit of a consumer strike to protest the War in Vietnam.

Letter from Pastor William A. Lawson to MLK

Sunday, September 25, 1966
Texas (TX), Dallas, TX

Pastor Bill Lawson writes Dr. King seeking his help with spreading the Civil Rights Movement in Houston. He asks King to establish a permanent SCLC office in Houston and engage in nonviolent demonstrations.

The Birth of a New Nation

GHANA, Alabama (AL)

Dr. King compares the ongoing civil rights struggle in the United States to the Hebrews' Exodus from Egypt.

Letter from Linda Frawley to MLK

Sunday, March 24, 1968
Massachusetts (MA), Boston, MA, Atlanta, GA

Linda Frawley, the campus coordinator for Suffolk University, requests any "pseudo-campaign" materials that Dr. King may be able to send. The materials are to be used in the National Intercollegiate Presidential Primary, sponsored by Time Magazine.

Response Letter from Miss D. McDonald to Professor Paul Kurt Ackerman

Thursday, July 13, 1967
Boston, MA

This letter is in response to Professor Paul Kurt Ackermann from Miss. D. McDonald, c/o MLK, referencing a request for submission of Dr. King's manuscript.

National Student Christian Federation Bulletin

Monday, February 29, 1960
New York, NY, Nashville, TN, Ohio (OH), New York (NY)

The National Student Christian Federation released several bulletins and informational letters regarding the student demonstrations in the 1960s. Herluf Jensen, General Secretary of the NSCF, provides readers with the progress of different trials related to the movement, arrest statistics and institutions involved. Obtaining strong civil rights legislation through Congress is discussed as well.

Notice from Leadership Conference on Civil Rights

Wednesday, April 10, 1968
Washington, D.C.

Here is a letter to stimulate local civil rights organizations to undertake visits to House and Senate members during Easter Recess. The visits were to push for legislative goals such as "at least a million jobs for the hardcore unemployed, decent low cost housing for all and repeal of punitive welfare restrictions." The Leadership Conference on Civil Rights issued this notice, in the days following Dr. King's assassination.

Letter of Recommendation for Sally Cantor

Saturday, February 25, 1967
Atlanta, GA

Mrs. W. M. Taylor, an English teacher at Grady High School, writes a letter of recommendation on behalf of Sally Cantor, a Russell H. Bull Scholarship applicant.

Letter from MLK and Albert A. Raby

Monday, July 10, 1967
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

Albert Raby and Dr. King assert that the Weston project is "a national test case for the integrity of Title VI of the 1964 Civil Rights Act." The population of Negroes in DuPage County is extremely low and the jobs would not offer for them an equal opportunity.

Nature of Religion

Dr. King indicates Schleiermacher's view on the nature of religion.

Walter Reuther Remarks at the March on Washington

Wednesday, August 28, 1963
Washington, D.C.

Walter P. Reuther, President of the International Union, UAW, expounds upon the cause of freedom and democracy in America from the perception of the external world. Reuther highlights the rights guaranteed by the United States Constitution and how they have been denied to African Americas living as "second-class" citizens. He further discusses the necessary duties of the United States Congress to recognize and initiate civil rights programs.

Catholics Involved in Integration

Saturday, October 1, 1966
New York (NY), Chicago, IL

Members of Catholics Involved in Integration write a letter to solicit membership to their organization. The cost to join the group is one dollar per month. The funds raised are donated to Dr. King in support of his efforts to gain peace, freedom, and equality.

Letter from MLK to Robert H. Gates

Monday, November 25, 1963
Missouri (MO), Birmingham, AL

Dr. King thanks Robert Gates for his contribution to the SCLC. King encloses an official receipt and expresses that his contribution will assist in their work in Birmingham and throughout the South.

Letter from June Gordon to MLK

Friday, July 9, 1965
New York, NY, New York (NY), Atlanta, GA

June Gordon, as the Executive Director of the Emma Lazarus Federation of Jewish Women's Clubs, issues a check to SCLC. They also pledge to assist other civil rights groups involved in the struggle for equality.

Letter from Maurice Mitchell to Neil Sullivan

Wednesday, September 6, 1967
Denver, CO, Berkeley, CA, Chicago, IL

Mr. Mitchell discusses fundraising for SCLC's Chicago literacy project. HEW recently withdrew their support of the project, but Mitchell is optimistic about potential support from foundations and major donors.

Painting

Dr. King paraphrases Homer's "The Odyssey" and quotes some prose entitled "The Bible."

Letter from MLK to Susan Rowland

Tuesday, November 7, 1967
CANADA, Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, Ohio (OH), Cleveland, OH

Dr. King informs Susan Roland, a member of the Student Christian Movement at the University of Western Ontario, that due to numerous commitments, he will be unable to accept the invitation to speak at the institution.

MLK Responds to Questions Pertaining to the Civil Rights Movement

Selma, AL, Alabama (AL), Michigan (MI), Detroit, MI, New Jersey (NJ), Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), VIETNAM, California (CA), Los Angeles, CA, Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Cleveland, OH, Ohio (OH)

Dr. King responds to a series of questions concerning such topics as his opposition to the Vietnam War, the direction of the Civil Rights Movement, urban riots in Detroit and Newark, and SCLC initiatives catered to the ghettos of the American South.