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Anonymous Letter to MLK

This letter addressed to Dr. King criticizes his beliefs in equality and justice. The anonymous author states that "we are living under devil law" and "justice belongs only to the devil." He or she continues, arguing that schools corrupt children, filling their brains with "devil wisdom and devil justice and devil love."

Memo from Joan Daves to Dr. King Regarding a Japanese Edition

Joan Daves, literary agent to Dr. King, requests permission from Dr. King to proceed with the Japanese edition of his book "Strength to Love" per the terms outlined in her letter of April 13.

Letter from Hugh Scott to MLK

Wednesday, April 28, 1965

Hugh Scott, U. S. Senator from Pennsylvania, assures Dr. King that he intends to support voting rights legislation and especially the proposal to eliminate the poll taxes instituted as a form of discrimination.

Let's Save Virginia Seminary

Tuesday, September 19, 1961

Reverend Virgil A. Wood implores his church, other churches and friends in the constituency of Virginia Seminary to not only continue their support, but to double it if possible.

Letter by William Castleman on Northern Marches

Thursday, August 11, 1966

William Castleman, Executive Director for the American Federation of Senior Citizens, commends Dr. King on the effectiveness of the marches in the North and says they should not be abandoned. At the time this letter was written, Dr. King had led numerous marches in Chicago and other urban cities focusing on equal housing. The correspondence references the Founding Fathers and the Constitutional rights that allow peaceful solution of the nation's problems.

In the Battle for Desegregation

Tuesday, September 1, 1964

Francis Keppel, U.S. Commissioner of Education, expresses his thoughts on the solution for desegregation. Keppel believes the best way to end segregation is through education, providing children with an education and outstanding teachers.

Letter to Dorothy Height from Dora McDonald

Thursday, January 5, 1967

Dora McDonald apologizes to Dorothy Height, President of the National Council of Negro Women, for not responding sooner to let her know that Dr. and Mrs. King would be unable to attend the Premier Life Membership Dinner. The invitation to the dinner came during Dr. King's sabbatical to write a new book.

Letter from MLK to Ernest Gruening

Wednesday, June 24, 1964

Dr. King expresses gratitude to Ernest Gruening, a United States Senator from Alaska, for supporting the passing of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter to the Honorable Jerome Cavanagh from Gloria Fraction

Tuesday, June 7, 1966

Miss Gloria Fraction drafted this response to a correspondence, sent from the Honorable Jerome Cavanagh, Mayor of Detroit, Michigan. Miss Fraction took the role as an additional secretary for Dr. King, while the SCLC underwent a major Open Housing Campaign Movement in Chicago in 1966. At the time this letter was written, SCLC operated out of their headquarters in Atlanta and their temporary offices in Chicago.

Letter from Genevieve Young to Joan Daves

Wednesday, January 4, 1967

Genevieve Young expresses her opinion about the outline for Dr. King's upcoming book "Where Do We Go From Here?" She offers some suggestions and strategies to Joan Daves to help narrow the scope of the manuscript.

Letter from Linda Gillies to MLK

Sunday, March 17, 1968

Chairman of the Choice '68 Steering Committee, Linda Gillies asks Dr. King about his stance on referendum issues. Topics that Dr. King was asked to respond to included King's opinion on what military action the U.S. should have in Vietnam, the course of action the US should pursue regarding bombing North Vietnam and governmental spending.

Christology

Dr. King references the concept of Christology by quoting German theologian Albrecht Ritschl.

Letter from Harry B. Henderson Jr. to MLK

Sunday, April 23, 1967

Harry Henderson writes Dr. King in support of Dr. King's stance on Vietnam. Henderson expresses his appreciation for Dr. King's "clearout and moving" speech regarding the United State's presence in Vietnam and he feels that only clergymen can take an effective stance. He also discusses how the Vietnam War is used as a scapegoat to keep the government from having to deal with discrimination issues in America.

Letter from Ella Jackson to MLK

Monday, February 5, 1968

Miss Ella Jackson, a 7th grader, writes to Dr. King concerning his leadership and involvement in civil disobedience. She advises Dr. King to speak to someone in power, otherwise his actions will lead to war.

The Chicago Plan

Friday, January 7, 1966

Dr. King makes a public statement addressing the poor economic and housing conditions in the North. Dr. King specifically identifies Chicago as the prototype for the conditions occurring within this region. He describes a three phase plan detailing how to properly address and manage the problems effectively.

Letter from Alfred K. Barr to MLK

Tuesday, February 22, 1966

Alfred Barr, of the Cosmopolitan Club of the University of Georgia Athens, invites Dr. King to speak at their campus, citing the fact that Dr. King was the only Nobel Prize winner from Georgia.

Communism

Dr. King quotes Friedrich Engles as he clarifies that Karl "Marx was not an economic determinist as many have thought." The economic situation and superstructure of society are noted as key elements.

Letter from T.Y. Rogers to MLK

Friday, January 6, 1967

T. Y. Rogers, an assistant to Dr. King at Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery writes the Reverend expressing his interest in traveling to Israel to tour the country with him. In addition, Rogers offers to assist with funds if necessary.

SCLC's Eighth Annual Convention Resolution

Friday, October 2, 1964

This SCLC Resolution for the 8th Annual Convention, outlines the plan to encourage churchmen across the country to vote in the light of religious faith and conviction.

Letter from Harry Daniels to MLK

Monday, February 12, 1968

This letter from Mr. Harry Daniels to Dr. King addresses, among other things, Medicare, the upcoming presidential election, and government lending.

MLK's Address to Syracuse University

Thursday, July 15, 1965

Dr. King, in a public speech at Howard University, talks about numerous factors that affect education in America.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Robert Goldwin

Wednesday, March 20, 1963

Dora McDonald informs Dr. Robert A. Goldwin the four essays on "100 Years of Emancipation" have been received and placed on Dr. King's desk for him to read upon his return from out of town.

Letter from Sam Garwood Concerning MLK's Involvement with the Vietnam Conflict

Sam Garwood expresses his opinion on the Vietnam War. It could have a negative effect on the Civil Rights Movement if Dr. King doesn't address the situation in a pleasing way to Americans. He believes that a lot of support gained could be lost due to the War.

MLK at his 36th Birthday Celebration

This series of photographs depicts Dr. King celebrating his birthday with family and friends.

Handwriiten Notecard Regarding Freedom

This notecard written by Dr. Martin Luther King, cites a quote, of Tillich, regarding freedom.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. White

Dr. King informs Mrs. White that she should seek financial assistance from her local welfare office because the SCLC will not be able to provide that service.

Letter from Chuck Mittlestadt to MLK

Tuesday, August 9, 1966

Mr. Miittlestadt praises Dr. King for utilizing the "Gandhian technique of Satygagraha" in the Civil Rights Movement. He relates Dr. King to Mahatma Gandhi and Prime Minister of India, Jawaharlal Nehru. Mr. Mittlestadt also discusses the downfall of CORE, encloses a donation, and requests a photograph of Dr. King.

Biographical Sketch of Andrew Young

This document outlines the education, pastoral, and vocational experience of Andrew J. Young, Executive Director of the SCLC.

Executive Director's Report

Tuesday, February 6, 1968

William A. Rutherford sends an informal report to the SCLC Executive Board in Washington, D.C. This is Rutherford's first report as an administrator of the organization and it purposes the ways in which the SCLC can better utilize, and apply, their resources.

Letter from Maude to MLK

Thursday, September 25, 1958

Maude extends her wishes for the rapid recovery of Dr. King, following a stabbing in New York. She assures him that she is holding down the fort and provides him with a breakdown of correspondences that he has received.