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"ALGERIA"

Letter from Joan Daves to Y. Katahira

Friday, June 26, 1964

Joan Daves writes Mr. Katahira asking for an update on an offer by Shinkyo Shuppan Sha for Dr. King's book "Strength To Love." She also asks Katahira to inform Tetsuo Kohmoto that Dr. King's current responsibilities and engagements are restricting him from writing the preface.

Statement by the Leadership Conference Executive Committee on the Kerner Commission Report

Tuesday, April 2, 1968

This statement put forth by the Leadership Conference Executive Committee addresses the results of the Kerner Commission Report, in which the author stresses that without creating viable and integrated communities in our cities "we shall have no cities".

Mission to Mississippi

The document, shown here, listed Dr. King and many other clergy as they invited other clergyman nationwide to an event called "Mission to Mississippi." The Mission was in support for the Freedom Riders of 1961. It included a one-day conference that was held in Jackson, MS. July 20, 1961. Unfortunately, this document was torn in half so the full remaining content continues, on the following attached page.

Letter from Rev. Robert Hoggard of Grace Cathedral to Dora McDonald

Thursday, February 18, 1965

Reverend Robert Hoggard, of Grace Cathderal in San Francisco, contacts Dora McDonald with the hope that Dr. King will be able to preach for their congregation on March 28, 1965.

Letter from Larry M. Otter & Alan Aftanski to MLK

Monday, March 25, 1968

Mount Saint Mary's College's Young Democratic and Young Republican Clubs inform Dr. King of their preparation for the National Collegiate Primary, Choice '68. Dr. King has been named a candidate in the mock election, so the organizers request information about his views. They also tell Dr. King that a speaking engagement can be arranged if Dr. King's schedule brings him to the Maryland area.

Letter from James Degener to MLK

Wednesday, February 23, 1966

Lutheran Church youth advisor James Degener asks that Dr. King assist him in showing a group of teenagers life around the dilapidated side of Chicago. Degener's goal is to expose the young people to the crippling and tragic conditions of the inner city. At the time of this correspondence, Dr. King and SCLC were in the midst of an open housing campaign in Chicago, known as the Chicago Freedom Movement.

Letter from Anonymous to MLK

Monday, February 5, 1968

The author of this letter expresses their concern about poverty across the United States and offers suggestions for Negros to build their own communities.

God

Dr. King cites a scripture that derives from the Old Testament biblical book of Deuteronomy, stating "the seeing of God's face meant death."

Letter from MLK to Rabbi Everett Gendler

Monday, December 2, 1963

Dr. King thanks Rabbi Gendler for his significant contribution to the SCLC. He asserts that the financial contributions will aid in the SCLC's political and social agendas in Danville, Virginia.

MLK Announces End of Birmingham Campaign

Friday, May 10, 1963

The Alabama Christian Movement for Human Rights released these remarks by Dr. King marking the end of the Birmingham Nonviolent Direct Action Campaign. King describes the day as a climax in the long struggle for justice and freedom in Birmingham and gives credit to Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth, to the thousands who went to jail, to the whites who worked for just solutions and to God. He speaks of the need for continued progress toward equal job opportunities, equal access to public facilities, and equal rights and responsibilities.

Support Negro Businesses

Tuesday, November 1, 1966

From November 1966 newspaper ad: "Support Negro Business" advertisement from the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Letter from Gino Gullace to MLK

Wednesday, December 1, 1965

Dr. King is asked to participate in a worldwide survey on the topics of "Happiness" and "Life After Death." The survey is sponsored by OGGI magazine a weekly publication in Milano, Italy.

Liberal Theology

Dr. King paraphrases [Theodore G.] Soares on the religious liberal.

Evil

Dr. King quotes the definition of evil and conceptualizes it as a "frustration."

Letter from Arthur LeSueur to MLK

Friday, May 12, 1967

Arthur LeSueur, a War World II veteran, expresses his support of Dr. King's endeavors to gain equality in America. He hopes that Dr. King will not be discouraged by the great injustices he has faced and will continue to hold strong to his position.

Segregation and Political Allegiance

Dr. King addresses segregation calling it "a house of prostitution built to perpetuate an illicit intercourse between injustice and immortality." He references James Meredith, the African American student who was prohibited from enrolling at the University of Mississippi because of his race, and encourages the Federal Government to exercise the force of the Constitution. He also asserts that African Americans must recognize the importance of voting and uniting with allies whose "interests are common with our own."

Envelope addressed to Coretta Scott King from the House of Representatives

This envelope is addressed to Coretta Scott King and originates from Congress. Notable are the stamps denoting the date of the post mark and date of receipt, six and eleven days, respectively, after the day of Dr. King's assassination.

Letter from August Schou to MLK

Thursday, November 26, 1964

August Schou of the Nobel Committee responds to Dr. King's secretary, Dora McDonald, regarding Dr. King's arrival in Norway for the Nobel Peace Prize Award. Schou explains the importance of Dr. King arriving at the recommended date as well as the proper attire and a short list of other individuals invited to join Dr. King.

Letter from Mary R. Hunt to Mrs.King Regarding Recommendation for Employment

Monday, May 27, 1963

Ms. Hunt, Director of the Extramural Department for Antioch College, sends Mrs. King the resume and photo of Dixie Lee Kisor for employment consideration.

Letter from MLK to Hugh Daugherty

Thursday, February 22, 1968

In this response letter to Hugh Daugherty, Dr. King extends his deep appreciation for contributions made to the SCLC. The reverend also apologizes for the delay in response.

Letter from Edward Enyedy to MLK

Tuesday, March 26, 1968

Mr. Enyedy writes to Dr. King to inform him of a mock Presidential convention sponsored by TIME Magazine and asks Dr. King for any campaign material he can provide.

Methodist Church Statement on Vietnam Conflict

The Board of Christian Social Concerns of the Methodist Church releases a statement regarding the conflict in Vietnam and possible outcomes and solutions. The board urges steps leading to a withdrawal of US forces from Vietnam.

Greeks

Dr. King shares his personal insight on Greek and African "ability," relative to African-Americans.

Letter from Monica Wilson to MLK

Friday, February 18, 1966

Monica Wilson reaches out to Dr. King on behalf of a student organization at the University of Cape Town to obtain a response to their invitation asking Dr. King to deliver the T. B. Davie Memorial Lecture.

Letter from Debbie Winchester to MLK

Tuesday, February 9, 1965

10-year-old Debbie Winchester writes Dr. King requesting an autograph for her collection.

Telegram from Dr. and Mrs. King to Uvee Arbouin

Dr. and Mrs. King write Uvee Arbouin to commend her Christian leadership and devotion to Jesus Christ.

Letter from Linda F. Neslage to MLK Regarding the I Have a Dream Speech

Monday, April 3, 1967

In this letter Linda F. Neslage of Scott Foresman and Company requests Dr. King's permission for non-profit organizations to make special editions of textbooks including his speech, "I Have A Dream."

Letter from Nelson A. Rockefeller to MLK

Friday, June 15, 1962

New York Governor Nelson A. Rockefeller writes Dr. King to tell him how much of a "privilege" it was to see him and meet Mrs. King at the Spelman College luncheon. He alludes to "tragic circumstances" surrounding his visit, but nonetheless conveys appreciation for the opportunity to be in attendance and meet with those working "for the cause of better understanding."

Letter to MLK Regarding the Poor

Wednesday, February 28, 1968

This letter, written under the pseudonym "A. Christian," criticizes Dr. King's work for the poor in the years following 1966. He states, "you have lost all respect for law and order what good do you think you are doing for the poor?" He further critiques Dr. King's public response to Communism and the Vietnam War.

Religious Book Club Invoices to MLK

The Religious Book Club sends Dr. King complimentary copies of books on prejudice and healing ministry in the church.