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Seasons Greetings from Roy Hamilton to MLK

Saturday, December 14, 1963
New York (NY), New York, NY

Roy Hamilton writes Dr. King to send Seasons Greetings to him and his family.

Telegram from Margit Vinberg to MLK

Monday, November 2, 1964
SWEDEN, Stockholm, Sweden, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, NORWAY, Oslo, Norway

Margit Vinberg invites Dr. and Mrs. King to be the guests of honor at a luncheon in Stockholm, Sweden, sponsored by the Joint Swedish Press Publicistklubben.

Draft Proposal for Southern Regional Community Services Council

Tuesday, March 29, 1966
Washington, D.C.

As a draft proposal for the non-profit Southern Regional Community Services Council, this document outlines the purpose and intended methodologies of the organization. The Council's mission is to train local leaders to help the unemployed and poor find jobs. Local leaders would include representation from churches, colleges, farm groups, professionals, and small businesses. Other goals are to increase living standards and cycle income back into businesses that focus on community savings and development.

Pittsburgh Courier: Mays

Saturday, April 29, 1950
Pittsburgh, PA

Dr. Benjamin E. Mays mourns the recent deaths of Charles Drew and Carter Woodson. Both were highly acclaimed individuals, not only because of their race but also in their areas of study. Drew developed large-scale blood banks during WWI and Woodson cultivated the idea of Black History Month.

Letter from MLK to Eliot Stadler

Thursday, August 20, 1964
Maine (ME)

Acknowledging receipt of a letter and a $1000 contribution to the SCLC, Dr. King sends his appreciation to Dr. Eliot Stadler. In closing, the Reverend expresses interest in meeting Stadler with regard to potential aid during the summer months.

Letter from Agnes Mack to MLK

Sunday, November 24, 1963
Florida (FL)

Agnes Mack writes Dr. King to request a copy of his "I Have a Dream" speech from the March on Washington. She also encourages him to continue in his efforts.

Letter from Theodore R. Britton Jr. to MLK

Saturday, February 24, 1968
San Francisco, CA, New York (NY), New York, NY, Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

Theodore R. Britton promotes the candidacy of Dr. King for the pastorship of Riverside Church throughout this letter. Britton also asserts that New York is in need of Dr. King's leadership and sermons.

Telegram from Mrs. Willie Bass to MLK

Thursday, September 23, 1954
New Jersey (NJ), New York, NY

Mrs. Willie M. Bass sent this telegram expressing her hope for Dr. King's speedy recovery during his stay at Harlem Hospital.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Elizabeth Babcock

Tuesday, February 2, 1965
New York (NY), Selma, AL, Alabama (AL)

Dora McDonald informs Mrs. Babcock that she received the contribution for the SCLC on behalf of Dr. King. Miss McDonald tells Mrs. Babcock that Dr. King is imprisoned in Selma, Alabama and that he will respond upon his release.

Letter from Reese High School Student to MLK

Tuesday, November 21, 1967
Michigan (MI)

Ann Renwick, a senior at Reese High School, informs Dr. King of a term paper she is writing about him and requests information regarding his next visit to Detroit. She also expresses discontent with prejudices against Negros in her small all-white town, but is determined to change the mentality of her peers.

Letter from MLK to Boldwen Collins

Monday, October 21, 1963
New York (NY)

Dr. King responds to a previous letter sent to him from Miss Boldwen Collins. He clarifies various points that were unclear to Miss Collins pertaining to the overall purpose of the civil rights movement and its effect on the nation. Dr. King explains that Negroes in the North and South want the same things as other human beings: freedom.

The Eternal Significance of Christ

Dr. King outlines a sermon and references the Book of 2 Corinthians. The passage states "It is impossible to understand the significance of Christ without understanding the whole history of Biblical religion."

Letter from J.H. Wheeler to MLK

Wednesday, October 12, 1966
Atlanta, GA, New York, NY

J.H. Wheeler requests Dr. King's attendance at the Morehouse College Board of Trustees meeting in New York City.

News from the SCEF

Monday, February 19, 1962
New Orleans, LA, Louisiana (LA)

The Southern Conference Educational Fund writes a statement regarding "two young leaders of integration" who visited a fellow leader in jail and also got arrested. Charles McDew, a Negro and Chairman of the SNCC, and Robert Zellner, a white man and staff member of the SNCC, were charged with criminal anarchy just for bringing books and fruit to a friend who was arrested for participating in demonstrations.

Letter from Cirilo McSween to MLK

Monday, December 18, 1967
Chicago, IL, New York (NY)

Cirilo McSween congratulates Dr. King for the reorganization of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Plowshare Pledge from Sargent Shriver

Wednesday, February 7, 1968
Indiana (IN), VIETNAM

This Plowshare Pledge, signed by Sargent Shriver, vows to use voting powers to have the savings of the military expenses invested in domestic human resources.

MLK Note Card - "Paint"

In this note card, Dr. King expresses his ideals and philosophical viewpoints on "...shin[ing] only for the life of imitative mediocrity."

Notecard Regarding Freedom

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines his insights on the concept of freedom.

Letter from Raphael Gould to Dora McDonald Re Thich Nhat Hanh

Friday, January 27, 1967
New York, NY

Raphael Gould, of The Fellowship of Reconciliation, writes to Miss McDonald requesting a letter from Dr. King nominating Thich Nhat Hanh for the Nobel Peace Prize. Mr. Gould calls attention to the approaching deadline and the extensive documentation that must accompany the letter.

MLK Royalty Statement from Joan Daves

New York, NY, FRANCE

This royalty statement from Joan Daves references a French publication of Dr. King's "Strength To Love".

The Self

Dr. King quotes Henry Nelson Wieman's book "The Source of Human Good."

Dr. Luther King Cause of U.S. Violence

Thursday, November 11, 1965
SOUTH AFRICA, New York (NY), Los Angeles, CA

The articles mentions Dr. King and his supposed involvement with the Communist Party. The author is not convinced that Dr. King is the "good Samaritan" everyone believes him to be, and he is ensuring more violence with his cause.

Letter to Mrs. King from Mrs. Boulware

Wednesday, April 10, 1968
New Jersey (NJ), Washington, D.C.

In this letter, Mrs. Boulware of Newark, New Jersey expresses her sympathy for Mrs. Coretta Scott King after the death of Dr. King. Boulware mentions that she was one of Dr. King's supporters and was a participant in the March on Washington. She closes by stating that Dr. King "is not dead, he is only resting."

Letter from Ann and George Laringer to MLK

Friday, June 9, 1967
Massachusetts (MA), VIETNAM

George Levinger's extends his gratitude to Dr. King for his stand against Vietnam. Levinger states, "One can preach nonviolence at home and ignore the violence abroad."

Saturday Review: Behind the Selma March

Saturday, April 3, 1965
Selma, AL, Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, Washington, D.C.

Dr. King describes the events surrounding the Selma-Montgomery Civil Rights March of 1965.

Letter from M.W. Espy to MLK

Tuesday, November 28, 1967
Alabama (AL)

This letter is requesting that Dr. King sign the First Day Cover of the twenty cent postage stamp honoring Gen. George C. Marshall. It is also noted that two other Nobel Peace Prize winners have signed the Cover as well.

Religion

Dr. King writes on the topic of religion, stating that the people living in the 18th century regarded religion as "the source of both political tyranny and social conflict."

Letter from Jerry Russell to Mrs. King

Thursday, April 11, 1968
Georgia (GA)

Jerry Russell offers his sympathy to Coretta Scott King following the death of Dr. King. He describes Dr. King as an individual of greatest integrity.

Letter From Birmingham City Jail

Wednesday, May 1, 1963
Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL)

Dr. King's famous "Letter from Birmingham Jail" is a response to a statement written by several Alabama Clergymen. In that statement, the Clergymen assert that Dr. King's methods are both "unwise and untimely." They brand him an "outside agitator" who should not be advocating the breaking of the law. Dr. King responds with this Letter and politely references Biblical, Classical and early American figures to counter the arguments of the Clergymen.

Letter to MLK from Mrs. Mary Jane Chattams

Friday, November 17, 1967
Ohio (OH), Berlin, Germany

Mrs. Chattams, a student, has contacted Dr. King for further clarity regarding a sermon he reportedly delivered in a Communist Church. Sharing Dr. King’s comments will be informative and beneficial for future class discussions.