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Article in the Martin Luther King Column

Dr. King recognizes that the Committee for United Negro Relief will sponsor a luncheon to honor Mrs. Daisy Bates at the Waldorf-Astoria. Dr. King calls her the "heroine of the Battle for the Soul of Little Rock." He further describes contributions made by Mrs. Bates and her husband, along with the hardships they endured "in retaliation for their temerity in writing, speaking and fighting for freedom."

Robert Garrett Asks Dr. King for Information

New York (NY)

Robert Garrett writes Dr. King to find out more information about the goals of his organization. Dr. King decides to send a brochure.

Individualization

Dr. King cites philosopher and theologian Paul Tillich's definition of individualization. He explains, "it is implied in and constitutive of every self, which means that at least in an analogous way it is implied in and constitutive of every being."

People In Action: Literacy Bill Dies

Saturday, May 26, 1962
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King shares his disappointment with the Senate vote that stopped the 1962 Voting Rights Bill, then known as the Literacy Bill. The bill would have eliminated the literacy tests that Dr. King believed were used to keep African-Americans of all education levels from qualifying to vote.

Telegram from MLK to Eartha Kitt

California (CA)

Dr. King requests a telephone conversation with Miss Kitt.

Sin

Dr. King writes about sin, according to Jeremiah 5:4.

Letter from MLK to J. S. Beckington

Wednesday, June 15, 1966
Massachusetts (MA)

Dr. King thanks Mr. J. S. Beckington for his contribution to the SCLC. King also expresses how important the loyal supporters are to his organization.

SCLC Newsletter: Of Riots and Wrongs Against Jews

Monday, July 27, 1964
New York (NY), New York, NY, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Florida (FL), St. Augustine, FL, Mississippi (MS)

Presented here, is a draft of an article published in the July-August 1964 edition of the SCLC Newsletter. The article highlights the discontentment of the author in relation to acts of violence against Jewish citizens.

Atheism

Dr. King ponders atheism by quoting a short anecdote of L.P. Jacks' shoemaker.

Letter from Don Hill to MLK

Tuesday, March 5, 1963
Detroit, MI, Michigan (MI)

Don Hill requests a written statement about the Emancipation Proclamation from Dr. King for inclusion in the souvenir program for the Michigan Prince Hall Grand Lodge's annual meeting. The program will celebrate the centennial anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation. Hill also requests a picture to include in the program.

Letter from Rosamond Reynolds to MLK

Boston, MA, Florida (FL), Atlanta, GA

Rosamond C. Reynolds informs Dr. King that the Fifth General Assembly of the Unitarian Universalist Association adopted a comprehensive Statement of Consensus on Racial Justice. The statement reflects "the preponderance of opinion of the denomination, its members, and its churches, on the problems of segregation, discrimination, racial violence, education, housing..."

Letter from Benjamin E. Mays to MLK

Saturday, June 30, 1962
Atlanta, GA

Benjamin E. Mays, President of Morehouse College, expresses his gratitude for the copy of the letter Dr. King sent to the editor of The Christian Century. Mays also inquires about the response of the editor.

Letter from Harry Daniels to MLK

Saturday, March 29, 1969
Washington, D.C., Philadelphia, PA, VIETNAM

Harry Daniels stresses the urgency of an American withdrawal from Asia and proposes appointing Dr. King as special ambassador to North Vietnam.

Letter from Jessie Tidwell to MLK

Monday, May 15, 1967

Jessie Tidwell writes Dr. King wishing him the best of luck and expressing interest in meeting him in person.

Letter From Don Rothenberg of Ramparts to MLK

San Francisco, CA, VIETNAM, California (CA)

Don Rothenberg, the Assistant to the Publisher of Ramparts Magazine, sent this letter to Dr. and Mrs. King with an advance copy of the January issue. The magazine, which was associated with the New Left, reported on the napalming of Vietnamese children in the war. Upon reading this, Dr. King was moved to become more vocal against the Vietnam War, which he later did, starting in April of 1967 with his "Beyond Vietnam" speech.

Statement by Reverend Jesse Jackson

Wednesday, August 16, 1967
Chicago, IL, Philadelphia, PA

Reverend Jesse Jackson gives a report regarding SCLC's Operation Breadbasket. Reverend Jackson states, "There are no riotous fires set aflame in this country that can be put out with water from a rubber hose; the flames must be extinguished by money from an economic hose."

Acknowledgement of Condolences

A standard form of an acknowledgment response, in reference to the receipt of condolences, is highlighted in this document.

White Backlash Growing

Friday, August 26, 1966
Chicago, IL, Denver, CO, ITALY, AUSTRIA, Boston, MA, GERMANY, FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR, POLAND, GREECE, Los Angeles, CA, Alabama (AL), Georgia (GA)

The intensity in the Civil Rights Movement increased as blacks remained segregated and the Black Power movement gained popularity. White backlash increased during these times, but Dr. King noted that demonstrations "did not breed hate, but only revealed hatred that already existed."

Letter from Lars Andr. Larssen to MLK

Wednesday, February 23, 1966
Oslo, Norway, SWEDEN

The Fredskontoret (Peace Bureau) of Norway invites Dr. King to speak in Oslo, with proceeds from the broadcast of his speech going towards the Civil Rights Movement.

Ideal Forms

Dr. King discusses ideal forms and eternal objects as described in Alfred North Whitehead's "Science and the Modern World" and "Religion in the Making."

Sin I and Sin II

Dr. King cites scripture in examining concepts of sin.

The Forbidden Book of the Century

California (CA)

J. Partyka's book, "Never Come Early" is announced as the "Forbidden Book" of the century. This announcement claims that the book wil "quake the hallowed halls of psychiatry, education and religion."

American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa Memorandum

Wednesday, May 17, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY, NIGERIA, Washington, D.C., UNITED KINGDOM, SOUTH AFRICA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, MALAWI, ZIMBABWE, NAMIBIA

Theodore Brown, Executive Director of the American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa, provides a progress report on ANLCA's work on Nigeria, Rhodesia (now Zimbabwe) and Southwest Africa (now Namibia). He mentions that the group offered to help the Nigerian federal government and the four regions mediate the conflict that resulted in the Nigeria-Biafra Civil War (1967-1970).

Letter from Neil Crichton-Miller to MLK

Tuesday, October 20, 1964
London, England

Neil Crichton-Miller, the Producer of the Talks Department of the British Broadcasting Corporation, congratulates Dr. King on winning the Nobel Peace Prize. Crichton-Miller asks Dr. King if they can reschedule a previously cancelled interview with Richard Kershaw and Leigh Crutchley for the BBC's "Frankly Speaking" program. He would like to conduct the interview when Dr. King flies to Europe to receive the Nobel Prize.

Origen

Dr. King records biographical information about Origen.

Letter from J.H. Wheeler to MLK

Monday, October 25, 1965
Atlanta, GA

The secretary of the Morehouse College Board of Trustees writes to Dr. King, enclosing the minutes of their meeting of April 10, 1965.

Dexter Avenue Baptist Church

Sunday, January 22, 1956
Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL

This is a church program for Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in early 1956. As Pastor, Dr. King gave a sermon on "Redirecting Our Missionary Zeal."

Trinitarianism

Dr. King discusses the doctrine trinitarianism, the belief that God is one being, existing in three equal persons.

Pantheism

Dr. King writes about an unknown author's view of pantheism.

The West Indies Laymen Nation Christian League on Communism

JAMAICA, RUSSIAN FEDERATION, CHINA

The article addresses the issue of Communism within the Caribbean and the need to stop its spread throughout the islands. The article stresses the importance of spreading the message of Christianity so that Communist thought can be laid to rest.