Themes

The Archive

Letter from Joan Daves to Dora McDonald Inquiring about Dr.King's Professional Tour

Tuesday, February 25, 1964

Mrs.Daves has requested that Mrs.McDonald send information pertaining to Dr.King's lectures and personal appearances to her office as soon as possible.

Evil

Dr. King references the concept of evil.

Nature and Perception

Dr. King discusses his philosophical perspective on perception and nature.

Revolt Without Violence - The Negroes' New Strategy

Monday, March 21, 1960

In this 1960 U.S. News & World Report article, Dr. King discusses the lunch counter sit-in movement spurring across the American South, the nonviolent approach to civil rights demonstrations, and the evolving status of the Negro.

Article Regarding New Head Start Project

Head Start is Shifted to College and Politics Behind OEO's Cutoffs.The two articles depicted provide details on the relationship between the Office of Economic Opportunity and the funds being cut off from the Child Development Group to be given to a small Mississippi college.

Letter from Cirilo McSween to MLK

Monday, December 18, 1967

Cirilo McSween congratulates Dr. King for the reorganization of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

The Gospel and How We Love Our Enemies

John C. Heidbrink sets forth the notion that in order to be a disciple of Christ, in any age, one must express unconditional love "toward him who seeks to destroy us," irrespective of differences in personal, national, or religious sentiments.

Letter from Burt Nelson and Hilda Nelson to MLK

Wednesday, April 19, 1967

Burt and Hilda Nelson write Dr. King requesting five copies of his address of April 5, 1967.

Excerpts from The Negro and the American Dream

Sunday, September 25, 1960

In this address to the Charlotte, North Carolina branch of the NAACP, Dr. King outlines five actions that Negroes must address in order to ensure their own first-class citizenship.

Letter from Larry T. Wimmer to MLK

Friday, December 2, 1966

Larry T. Wimmer, Assistant Professor at Brigham Young University, writes Dr. King seeking information regarding his views on communism and the Civil Rights Movement. He also asks if it is possible to obtain any films regarding the Civil Rights Movement and Dr. King's leadership.

Letter from Glenda Stultz to MLK

Sunday, April 26, 1964

Glenda Stultz asks Dr. King to send her information about how he was influenced by Mahatma Gandhi and Henry David Thoreau. She requests the information for a research paper, which she must complete in order to graduate.

"King's New Book, "Where Do We Go From Here?"

Friday, June 23, 1967

This Argus newspaper clipping is a mini review of Dr. King's last book, "Where Do We From Here: Chaos or Community?"

A Knock At Midnight

Sunday, August 9, 1964

In a tape-recorded address to the Riverside Church in New York City, Dr. King compares the civil rights struggle to a parable from St. Luke. His sermon specifically tackles contemporary social issues such as segregation, discrimination, and the philosophy of nonviolence. In addition, Dr. King explores the role of the church in dealing with such problems.

The Civil Rights Struggle in the United States Today

Saturday, May 1, 1965

This pamphlet, published by the Association of the Bar of the City of New York, is a transcript of an address delivered by Dr. King titled "The Civil Rights Struggle in the United States Today." In his first speech before the organization, Dr. King recounts the history of the global civil rights movement.

Letter from High School Senior Doris Magwood to MLK

Thursday, November 5, 1964

The senior class of Haut Gap School in John's Island, South Carolina invites Dr. King to deliver its baccalaureate sermon.

Righteousness

Dr. King records a quote on righteousness from Karl Barth's "The Epistle to the Romans."

Letter to MLK from Ray Cerreta

Mr. Ray Cerreta, of Jackson Heights, New York, requests an autograph from Dr. King for his personal collection.

Letter from Cornelius E. Gallagher to MLK

Tuesday, August 24, 1965

Cornelius E. Gallagher writes Dr. King concerning the signing of the discharge petition concerning home rule for the District of Columbia.

Letter from William M. Grayson to Dora McDonald

Tuesday, March 13, 1962

William M. Grayson, President of a chapter of the NAACP in West Virginia, requests information regarding Dr. King's schedule of speaking engagements for 1963.

Letter from D. E. Goorman to MLK

Saturday, February 17, 1968

D. E. Goorman advises Dr. King on how to promote peace, freedom and economic security for all US citizens. He suggests "appealing to the moral conscience" of the majority while implementing an economic action plan.

U.S. News & World Report: Negro Leaders Tell Their Plans for '64

Monday, February 24, 1964

Past, present and future efforts in the area of civil rights are discussed in interviews of five organizational leaders in the civil rights movement. These leaders are: Whitney M. Young, Jr. of the National Urban League, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. of the SCLC, Roy Wilkins of the NAACP, James L. Farmer of CORE, and James Forman of SNCC.

Letter from S.W. McAllister to MLK

Mr. McAllister, a father of three, requests Dr. King's assistance in obtaining a divorce from his wife who is living with another man. Dr. King was an image of hope for many people and often received requests for help in areas unrelated to civil rights.

Prayer (Definition)

Dr. King quotes William James' definition of Prayer.

Dr. King-Notecard

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines Brown's views on religion. This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions, and bible verses.

Letter from MLK to Rev. W.C. Dobbins

Monday, October 21, 1963

Dr. King informs Rev. Dobbins that he is unable to meet with him in the next few months, but possibly will be able to in the coming spring.

Letter from A. Susi to MLK

Monday, March 13, 1967

The Local 89 Chefs, Cooks, Pastry Cooks and Assistants Union of New York provided Dr. King with $100 to aid in his work for equality.

Address by Rabbi Joachim Prinz

Wednesday, August 28, 1963

Rabbi Joachim Prinz's address at the March on Washington focuses on the importance of freedom. He relates the struggle that blacks are currently enduring to the Nazism Jews faced during the reign of Hitler.

The Trinity

Dr. King provides the historical origin and ideology of the Trinity.

The 105th Anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation-Rev. C.L. Fullwood

Rev. C.L. Fullwood drafts a sermon to commemorate the "105th Anniversary of the Emancipation Proclimation for the Black People of America.:

Letter From Joan Daves to Hermine Popper

Thursday, July 20, 1967

Joan Daves informs Hermine Popper of an issue regarding writing credit for Dr. King's book "Where Do We Go from Here."