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Letter from Richard Boone to Barbara Hicks

Friday, July 2, 1965
Montgomery, AL

Rev. Boone encloses some adverse literature to be distributed to Dr. King and others.

Letter from Rev. J. H. Cole to Roy Wilkins and MLK

Monday, July 31, 1967
Mississippi (MS), Louisiana (LA), Detroit, MI, New Jersey (NJ), Washington, D.C.

Rev. Cole writes to Dr. King and Roy Wilkins of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) to convey his disgust at the treatment of Negroes in such areas as housing, education, politics and police brutality. He suggests the initiation of a nationwide letter writing campaign to every member of Congress to highlight this treatment and seeks a program that will provide Negroes with jobs skills. Cole also encloses a letter he sent to President Johnson and Attorney General Ramsey Clark regarding Congress' disregard of "racial discontent."

Letter from Howard Moore Jr. to MLK

Tuesday, November 3, 1964

Mr. Moore, of the Atlanta law firm Hollowell, Ward, Moore & Alexander, congratulates Dr. King on receiving of the Nobel Peace Prize. He goes on to encourage Dr. King and the SCLC to "establish a full fledge non-sectarian four year college and graduate school."

Letter from Bea Subt to MLK

Saturday, April 22, 1967
New York, NY, California (CA), VIETNAM, CAMBODIA, PHILIPPINES, AUSTRALIA

The author sends Dr. King a letter informing him that she is withdrawing her assistance toward civil rights workers since he has decided to be a politician, military leader and diplomat. She also questions how he can fight for equal rights in a country that's not worth protecting from the communists.

Letter from the Pacifist Crusade "John XXIII" to MLK

Sunday, April 11, 1965
ARGENTINA

Members of the Pacifist Crusade of Argentina extend support to Dr. King in his quest for peace. The group explains the background of the organization and express their goal of world peace through reconciliation.

The Voter Registration Project of Winston-Salem Presents MLK

Monday, April 13, 1964
North Carolina (NC), Atlanta, GA

This program details the schedule and many sponsors of a Voter Registration Project event in North Carolina, in which Dr. King was the keynote speaker.

SCLC Duties

Mississippi (MS), Georgia (GA), Alabama (AL), Virginia (VA), North Carolina (NC), South Carolina (SC), Louisiana (LA), Tennessee (TN)

This document outlines general responsibilities and specific duties of SCLC officers. Top level members listed include Dr. King, President, Wyatt Tee Walker, Executive Assistant to President, Andrew Young, Program Director, Mrs. Dorothy F. Cotton, Office Manager and Educational Consultant, and Ralph Abernathy, Financial Secretary-Treasurer. The document states that Dr. King's general responsibility as President is to "coordinate and interpret the total program of SCLC."

Sensuality

Dr. King quotes Reinhold Niebuhr's "The Nature and Destiny of Man" on pride as the basic sin and sensuality the result of pride.

God

Dr. King quotes Paul Tillich's "Systematic Theology."

Dr. King Announces Appointment of Director of New SCLC Project to Train Urban Negro Leaders

Wednesday, January 10, 1968
GEORGIA, Atlanta, GA, Alabama (AL), Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), New York (NY), New York, NY, Detroit, MI, Michigan (MI), Washington, D.C., Missouri (MO), New Jersey (NJ), Birmingham, AL, San Francisco, CA, California (CA)

In a press release, Dr. King announces Rev. T.Y. Rogers as the Director of the Negro ministerial training, a project created by the SCLC. The purpose of this program is to provide training seminars for ministers, which will ultimately assist congregational members with employment, economic development, voter registration, and education.

Letter from Ms. Dora McDonald to Mr. Robert Friedman

Tuesday, February 20, 1968
Oregon (OR)

In this letter Ms. Dora McDonald informs Mr. Friedman of the University of Oregon that Dr. King's schedule will not allow for a contribution to "Forensic Quarterly". Such regrets were increasingly frequent occurrences as Dr. King’s prominence and workload grew.

Letter from the Spring Mobilization Coordinating Center to MLK

Monday, February 27, 1967
VIETNAM, Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Los Angeles, CA, California (CA), San Francisco, CA, New York (NY), New York, NY

A.L. Everett conveys pleasure in knowing Dr. and Mrs. King are sponsors of the Spring Mobilization Committee to End the War in Vietnam, and that Dr. King will be speaking at an upcoming rally in San Francisco on April 15th. Everett requests that any further press releases concerning the planned demonstrations in both San Francisco and New York also include statements from both Dr. and Mrs. King.

Letter from George Carlson to MLK

Friday, September 28, 1962
Washington (WA), Oregon (OR), Atlanta, GA

George Carlson informs Dr. King that he handled the public relations and publicity for his appearance in Seattle. In addition, Mr. Carlson notifies Dr. King that the Jewish Temple in Portland requests the status his availability for a speaking engagement.

Letter from James T. Hale to MLK

Tuesday, September 22, 1964
Tennessee (TN), Atlanta, GA

Morehouse alumnus James T. Hale invites Dr. King to speak to the community in Clarksville, Tennessee. He expresses how the majority of the community has not had the opportunity to hear Dr. King speak and asks that Dr. King provide a possible date.

Letter from James Lynwood Walker to MLK

Monday, May 1, 1967
Berkeley, CA

James Lynwood Walker writes Dr. King about Muhammed Ali's refusal to join the army.

Address by MLK at the 30th Anniversary of District 65

Wednesday, October 23, 1963
New York (NY), New York, NY

This document, an address given by Dr. King on the 30th anniversary of District 65, includes handwritten notes. In the address, Dr. King talks about the importance of the Declaration of Independence and the Emancipation Proclamation to human rights.

Telegram from Richard Daley to Dr. King Requesting Meeting

Chicago, IL

Chicago Mayor Richard Daley invites Dr. King to meet with him and other religious leaders to discuss programs that will improve the quality of life in Chicago.

News from the AFL-CIO: Labor News Conference

Washington, D.C., UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Ohio (OH), Cleveland, OH, New York (NY), New York, NY

AFL-CIO's public affairs program, the Labor News Conference. Donald Slaiman, Director of the AFL-CIO's Department of Civil Rights was questioned by Alan Adams of Business Week Magazine and Stanley Leward of Scripps-Howard Newspapers. The three have a discussion about apprenticeship opportunities for minority youths, particularly of Negro and Puerto Rican heritage.

Answers in the American Way

Monday, March 25, 1968
VIETNAM, New York, NY, Detroit, MI, Philadelphia, PA

This text derives from a television show outlining the facts of the Black Panther Party. In attendance were civil rights activist like Dr. King, Stokely Carmichael, H. Rapp Brown and their affiliates within the Civil Rights Movement.

Note to MLK from Mrs. Ed Brooke

This note from Mrs. Ed Brooke is extremely negative towards Dr. King, accusing him of inciting riots and calling him names.

Letter from Dora McDonald to William K. Du Val

Tuesday, June 4, 1963
New York, NY, Birmingham, AL, LEBANON

Dora McDonald responds to William K. Du Val of the Commission on Ecumenical Mission and Relations on behalf of Dr. King.

Letter from Mr. Paul W. Moon to Miss Dora McDonald

Thursday, January 17, 1963
New York, NY

Paul Hoon of the Union Theological Seminary, asks Ms. McDonald if the invitation formerly extended to Dr. King has had any change in status.

Letter from Virginia M. Burke & Phyllis M. Banks to MLK

Friday, August 9, 1963
Milwaukee, WI, Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C.

Virginia Burke and Phyllis Banks express their interest in distributing "The Negro Is Your Brother", better known as "Letter from Birmingham Jail", to Wisconsin leaders to inform them of the goals and aspirations of Dr. King and his following. Burke and Banks explain that while the document had appeared in multiple publications, they feel that it has yet to reach the wide audience it deserves. They ask Dr. King's permission to reprint and distribute the document if he holds the copyright.

Letter from Clara Sturges Johnson to MLK

Thursday, December 5, 1963
California (CA)

Ms. Johnson informs Dr. King of her efforts promoting the passing of the "Kennedy Civil Rights Memorial Act." The United States Congress would go on to pass this act in 1964.

Letter from Louise Andrews Sims to MLK

Thursday, October 18, 1962
Pennsylvania (PA), Philadelphia, PA, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Louise Andrews Sims asks Dr. King to consider providing assistance to the American Friend's Service Committee by setting aside one week for aspeaking engagement in October or November of 1963. Alternate dates could be in January through April of 1964.

Letter from the United Nations to MLK

Tuesday, December 12, 1967
CANADA, New York (NY), New York, NY

Robin Skuce, Education Secretary of the United Nations Association in Canada, writes Dr. King inquiring of his availability to lecture at a seminar for high school students at their New York headquarters.

Letter from MLK to Alan Bible

Wednesday, June 24, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King expresses gratitude to Alan Bible, a United States Senator from Nevada, for supporting the passing of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter from MLK to Peter S. Kliewer

Thursday, July 13, 1967
California (CA), VIETNAM

In response to a "letter to the editor" from the "Times-Advocate" sent in by a reader, Dr. King addresses America's role in Vietnam.

Letter from Kate Krauthemier to MLK about a St. Louis Appearance

Monday, August 17, 1964
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Missouri (MO)

In this letter, Kate Krautheimer of the Artists and Speakers Bureau,urgently requests an appearance from Dr. King to St. Louis University.

Telegram from Clarance L Carroll to MLK

Thursday, January 27, 1966
Chicago, IL

Mr. Carroll sends a congratulatory telegram to Dr. King. He also requests future correspondence.