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Letter from Ruthe T. Sheffey to MLK

Thursday, November 9, 1967

In this letter, Ms. Sheffey asks Dr. King's permission to use his "I Have a Dream" speech in her upcoming textbook, "Impressions in Asphalt." Ms. Sheffey is a faculty member at Morgan State College, who is working on a textbook of poetry and prose with coworker, Eugenia Collier.

An Appeal from MLK to Negro and White Men of Goodwill

Dr. King discusses the impact that segregated schooling has on Negro children. He urges Negro and "white men of goodwill" to join together in the fight for the integration of schools.

Memo from Joan Daves to Dr. King Regarding Schedule

Monday, August 3, 1964

In this memo, Joan Daves informs Dr. King that Victor Weybright will telephone his London organization. Joan then suggests that Dr. King make himself available in London on August 17.

Next Steps In The South

Sunday, July 1, 1956

The Southern Regional Council publishes a pamphlet that addresses the landmark Brown vs. Board of Education Supreme Court Case and what its implications mean for society. The pamphlet goes on to answer several questions concerning school integration and gives background information on the case and the issues of segregation.

Alabama Council Newsletter

Amidst a battle between federal and states' rights, Reverend Hughes discusses the arrival of the Commission on Civil Rights and its intended purpose in the state of Alabama.

Royalty Statement for Dr. King’s “Strength to Love”

Saturday, January 1, 1966

This statement from Joan Daves details royalty earnings for the Finnish edition of Dr. King's "Strength to Love," published by Kirjapaja.

Letter from Leroy Johnson to MLK

State Senator Leroy R. Johnson forwards a Senate Pass to Dr. King, and informs him of an open invitation to visit the Senate at his leisure.

Telegram from Charles Cogen to MLK

Wednesday, November 1, 1967

Charles Cogen, President of the American Federation of Teachers, writes Dr. King a note expressing that there is national shame because Dr. King is in jail for defending constitutional rights. He also informs Dr. King that they are making their outrage known publicly.

Walter Winchell: American Talking Back

In this article, Walter Winchell provides excerpts of news articles and adds his own commentary to each. Following an excerpt about Dr. King's having a conference to coordinate civil disobedience activities, Winchell urges his leaders to write to Dr. King and "tell him to stop posing as a Man of Peace and 'fess up that his big "act" is causing more trouble than Ho Chi Mihn." Other recipients of Winchell's attention in this column include President Lyndon B. Johnson.

Letter from Gerald G. Fenn to MLK

In this letter, Geraldine Fenn described the many ventures that occurred the previous year. Her main focus was on 4-H and combining agriculture with race relations. She felt that by understanding and respecting people from different backgrounds, it could then lead to a collective of peace and love.

The Stresses of the White Female Worker in the Civil Rights Movement in the South

Dr. Alvin F. Poussaint describes social and psychological stresses that white female civil rights workers encounter in both their living and working conditions in the American South in the 1960's.

Letter from Merle B. Foreman to MLK

Tuesday, October 11, 1966

Merle B. Foreman is writing to Dr. King in hopes of receiving an autograph. She also encloses a self addressed stamped envelope.

Letter from Norberto Ibarrondo to MLK

Friday, May 21, 1965

Norberto Ibarrondo, President of Children Organization for Civil Rights, writes Dr. King expressing their desire to replace "discrimination with brotherhood." Ibarrondo informs Dr. King of a fundraiser their organization sponsored and encloses the money as a contribution. Ibarrondo also states that their school is dedicating their yearbook to President Kennedy and Dr. King.

Letter from Thomas H. Uzzell

Monday, July 16, 1962

Thomas Uzzell asks Dr. King to read his book entitled, "The Twilight of Self-Government." Mr. Uzzell's book deals with the racial crisis in America and how it "can be solved in a democratic manner."

Letter from Carolyn Fewell to MLK

Monday, June 12, 1967

In this letter, Mrs. Fewell, secretarial assistant to the dean of the Wesley Theological Seminary, thanks Dr. King for his sending his book, "Where Do We Go From Here."

Contradiction and the Power of God

Dr. King reflects on man's understanding of God and salvation.

Letter from Arthur R. Mann to Dora McDonald

Monday, November 1, 1965

Arthur Mann thanks Dora McDonald for her hospitality during a recent visit to Atlanta by New York Governor Nelson A. Rockefeller.

Telegram from C. C. Shell to MLK

C. C. Shells writes Dr. King suggesting that segregationist Lester Maddox run for President of the United State with Dr. King as Vice President.

The Kingdom

Dr. King references New Testament passages related to The Kingdom.

Sincerity and Intelligence

Dr. King reviews the Christian teaching of sincerity and its relationship to intelligence. Referencing Judaistic history and a biblical story involving the Apostle Paul, he comments that sincerity alone is lacking. He insists that Christians must infuse their sincerity with intelligence in order to "solve the spiritual problems of the world."

Freedom

Dr. King elaborates on the ideas of Paul Tillich regarding the doctrine of freedom. Mr. Tillich details the affirmation of determinism capabilities and the function of "will."

Letter from Edmond Melis to MLK

Saturday, January 23, 1965

Edmond Melis asks Dr. King to write a forward for an international police association magazine. He also expresses an interest in helping end discrimination in the United States.

Letter from Chauncey Eskridge to David Acton

Tuesday, November 21, 1967

This letter from Chauncey Eskridge to David Acton request the Leeds & Northrup Foundation provide a grant to the Southern Christian Leadership Foundation. Chauncey Eskridge includes a tax exempt letter and a copy of the trust instrument outlining the creation of the Southern Christian Leadership Foundation. Both Dr. King and Mr. Bernard Jackson received a copy of this letter.

MLK's Address at the Pilgrimage for Democracy

Sunday, December 15, 1963

Dr. King discusses the issues of segregation, poverty and discrimination within the City of Atlanta, in this 1963 speech at the Pilgrimage for Democracy. He explains that although Atlanta was thought to be a place of "racial harmony," the reality of glaring discrimination in Atlanta's schools, restaurants, and housing has left the local Negro community "tired," and hungry for change.

Financial Breakdown on the Basis of Individual Contributions

Dr. King illustrates the financial breakdown of individual financial contributions over the course of a year, broken down by number of people and amount per person.

Immorality

Dr. King cites a quotation from the book entitled "War and Peace" by Leo Tolstoy. Mr. Tolstoy includes a dialogue between two characters in the book that discuss immorality. One character references "Hender's Theory" to expound upon the reality of life and death.

Letter from Roslyn Wilkins to MLK

Friday, June 11, 1965

Roslyn Wilkins of California asks Dr. King for his opinion on interracial marriage. Wilkins asserts that her mother would rather her marry a Japanese man because, as Wilkins is white, they are closer in color.

Letter from Stephen Weeg to MLK

Friday, July 2, 1965

The University of Notre Dame's Committee on Negro Enrollment seeks advice from Dr. King on where to obtain financial aid for African American Students.

Crusade for Citizenship

Friday, October 21, 1966

This check was issued to Chauncey Williams for his assistance with the Crusade For Citizenship's voter registration campaign.

The False God of Science

Sunday, July 5, 1953

In this manuscript the author addresses their belief on the validity of modern man making a god of science.