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Racism

Associated Archive Content : 421 results

Hungry Club Speech

This document is a draft copy of Dr. King's Hungry Club Speech, in which he speaks on the subject "America's Chief Moral Dilemma." He states that the dilemma is "the means by which we live have out distanced the ends for which we live." Dr. King thoroughly discusses the three major evils that contribute to this dilemma: the evil of racism, the evil poverty, and the evil of war. He also discusses the progress of the Civil Rights Movement as it enters a new phase of fighting for "genuine equality."

I'll Take My Stand

Thelmore Cooper Trotman composes this poem entitled "Ill Take My Stand." The poem expresses the plight of the Negro struggle and the injustices of a case involving the rights of five Negros. Mr. Trotman elaborates on his personal health as he is of old age and explains his appreciation for Dr. King's organization.

Introduction to the Demands of the Freedom Movement

This document discusses the injustices and inequalities that Negroes are facing in Chicago's urban communities. The author outlines the struggles blacks endure in a variety of different arenas such as racism, discrimination, poverty, unemployment and segregation.

Introduction to the Demands of the Freedom Movement

The Negros in Chicago are faced with numerous systematic societal restrictions as they are excluded from many aspects of an American life. The Negros are subjected to segregation and substandard housing that are identified as "crime-infested slums." The plight of the Negro in Chicago involves insufficient housing and education as well as economic and social exclusion.

Invitation from C.W. De Kiewiet to MLK

Cornell William De Kieweit invites Dr. King to speak as the T.B. Davie Memorial Lecturer at the University of Cape Town in South Africa. Mr. De Kieweit explains the civil rights struggle in South Africa and explains that Dr. King's appearance would be of great help.

Invitation to the 16th Annual Convention for the Synod of Toronto and Kingston Presbyterian Young People'e Society

Jack Green and David Powell invite Dr. King to speak at the 16th Annual Convention for the Synod of Toronto and Kingston Presbyterian Young People's Society. The theme of the convention is "First They Gave Themselves." CBC National Television Network has offered to televise Dr. King's speech.

Let My People Vote

In this statement for the Amsterdam News, Dr. King assures that a victory is in the midst regarding the Senate's recent passage of the voting bill. He elaborates on the objectives of SCOPE, as there is much to accomplish. He ends the statement with the battle cry, "Let My People Vote."

Letter from A. J. de Witte to Roy Wilkins

A. J. de Witte writes Roy Wilkins condemning him for scolding Dr. King's outspoken dissatisfaction with the war in Vietnam. Witte explains the importance of civil rights leaders engaging in the discussion surrounding the war.

Letter from A. Phillip Randolph to MLK

A. Philip Randolph writes Dr. King requesting that he join as a sponsor in the campaign to decrease customers of the two chief banks supporting apartheid in South Africa.

Letter From A.H. Emmott to MLK

A. H. Emmott congratulates Dr. King on winning Time Magazine's "Man of the Year" award and invites him to speak at the Annual Convention of the Union of British Columbia Municipalities in Canada. The UMBC is an organization, which represents the interests of local governments within the Province of British Columbia.

Letter from A.J. de Witte to Roy Wilkins

A.J. de Witte conveys his dissatisfaction to Roy Wilkins over the NAACP's criticism of Dr. King's opposition to the Vietnam War. De Witte withdraws his financial support to the NAACP, instead contributing to Dr. King, Stokley Carmichael of SNCC and Floyd McKissick of CORE.

Letter from Alfonzo Henderson to Afro-Americans

This letter from ARIDO (Afro-American Resource Industrial Development Organization) president Alfonzo Henderson outlines the organization's program goals.

Letter from Alfred Gunn to MLK

Alfred L. Gunn requests Dr King's support of Gunn's "new Democratic way of Philosophy." Mr. Dunn also encloses three manuscripts pertaining to riots, the American gun and rifle laws, and the occurrence of racial problems in America.

Letter from an Asylum Inmate to MLK Seeking Assistance

Paul Douglas Ware, an untried inmate, requests Dr. King's "understanding, moral support, and possible assistance." Mr. Ware informs Dr. King of detailed information regarding his unjust treatment, his personal life, his present state of mind and most importantly his desire to have a stronger bond with "his own people."

Letter from Ann Pooney to MLK

Ann Pooney expresses her sentiments regarding Dr. King's teachings and the state of African Americans. Pooney feels that most blacks have not proven to be good Christians or citizens of the US.

Letter from Arthur Spence to MLK

Spence writes Dr. King defending the critical perceptions that some whites hold of blacks. As an African American, Spence feels that some members of his race have developed bad habits.

Letter from B. J. Mason to President Johnson

B. J. Mason deplores how justice is not yet color-blind, at least in Alabama. Mason states that Mr. Boykin's right to "due process of law" is being violated. Edward Boykin admitted guilt to a crime and was sentenced to death, but the trial judge had not ensured that the defendant understood the plea. The U.S. Supreme Court overturned the conviction in Boykin vs. Alabama (1968), citing the Fifth and Fourteenth Amendments.

Letter from Bette Zugerman to Rev. Abernathy, SCLC

Ms. Zugerman writes Reverend Abernathy to introduce an enclosed document which she suggests is the "one and only non-violent answer to alleviate the suffering of all people."

Letter From Birmingham City Jail

This version of Dr. King's "Letter From Birmingham Jail," published by the American Friends Service Committee, also includes the original statement made by the clergyman that prompted Dr. King's response. The eight clergymen described Dr. King's actions as "unwise and untimely." In his response, Dr. King references biblical and historical figures to illustrate why the Civil Rights Movement can no longer wait. He also expresses his frustration with many within organized religion and the moderate white American.

Letter from Burke Marshall to MLK

Burke Marshall, Assistant Attorney General, writes Dr. King acknowledging his previous telegram about racism in St. Augustine, Florida. In addition, Marshall refers a copy of the telegram to the attention of George B. Hartzog, Jr.

Letter from C. Alexander Brown to MLK

C. Alexander Brown requests that Dr. King and the SCLC conduct an investigation on the conditions of black prisoners in American jails. After reading about cruel conditions in an Arkansas prison, Brown questions how many innocent black prisoners are confined.

Letter from Charles E. Waring to MLK

Calling himself "a pale face Christian," Charles E. Waring writes Dr. King to acknowledge that all Christians must aid African Americans in their fight for fair representation and respect as equal human beings. He denounces whites who condemn Dr. King and asks, "what can we white Christians do to help recover the leadership of the Negro cause to worthy men?"

Letter from Charles J. Benner to MLK

Dr. King is adversely described in this letter and accused of being a communist by Charles Benner. He further slanders the Negro race and objects to the current national movements lead by Dr. King.

Letter from Charles W. Martine to Ohio Senator

This letter from Dental Technician Charles W. Martin speaks out against the racism in America. He denounces George Wallace as a racist candidate for the 1968 Presidential Election, admonishes members of Congress for not speaking out against Mr. Wallace, and states he will leave the service if Mr. Wallace is elected to the Presidency.

Letter from Clarence G. Petersen to MLK

Clarence G. Petersen tells Dr. King that he should avoid marching in the city of Cicero. Petersen describes Cicero as a slum with old houses and an oppressive, industrial atmosphere. While Petersen supports Dr. King's campaign, he believes it'd be best if the city were avoided for Dr. King's safety.

Letter from Clarita Wordlaw to MLK

Mrs. Wordlaw requests that Dr. King instructs the New Bern, North Carolina SCLC Chairman to refrain from demonstrations against Negroes. She also informs Dr. King of actions that should be taken to benefit the Negroes of New Bern.

Letter from Claudette Holston to MLK

Claudette Holston writes Dr. King expressing the plight she has faced as a black woman in Michigan and Georgia. She asks Dr. King, "how would you feel if I was your daughter or wife?" and strongly urges him to write back.

Letter from Committee on Racial Justice

In this letter, the Committee on Racial Justice provides update on their activities and encouragement.

Letter from Darlene Wentz to MLK

Darlene Wentz, a Senior at Streeter High School, request pamphlets on the social and economic conditions of African Americans.

Letter from David Brandyberry to MLK

David Brandberry, a student 16 years of age, informs Dr. King that he desires to voice his opinion about the racial issues in the south. Mr. Brandberry cannot comprehend the logical reasoning of racism and the motives of the "ignorant whites." Furthermore, the student discusses the issues of immigration and the political concept of communism. Mr. Brandberry states that he "wish he had been born a Negro" to he could be of more assistance in the movement.

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