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Race Relations

Associated Archive Content : 653 results

Importance of Negro History and Independence

Dr. King speaks to society's misunderstanding of Negro thought and the resulting tensions in race relations. He attributes this misunderstanding to the lack of Negro history authentically represented in books. Contrived myths created by "omission and commission in books" have reinforced prejudice and faulty sense of white supremacy. He observes that illusions cloud reality and render hostility. Society's unresolved problems are aggravated by racial misconceptions.

Information Regarding the Baha'i Faith

This excerpt on the Baha'i Faith claims that America is to be a leader in bringing world peace. The Baha'i faith has spread worldwide and promotes all religions as having a common golden rule.

Institute on Nonviolent Resistance to Segregation

The SCLC publishes this manifesto declaring that all eyes are focused on the South as it confronts the controversial issues of freedom and equality for Negroes. In the quest for equality, the southern Negros' plan of defense is Christian love and non-violent resistance. The document not only reveals tragic conditions in the South, but also affirms five principles by which equality can be achieved for Negro citizens.

International Confederation for Disarmament and Peace

This pamphlet provides information regarding the history, purpose and plans for the International Confederation for Disarmament and Peace.

Introduction to an Educational Program on Nonviolence

This document explains the purpose of an educational program on nonviolence. The document then goes into specific details on the curriculum taught in the workshops for nonviolence.

Invitation from C.W. De Kiewiet to MLK

Cornell William De Kieweit invites Dr. King to speak as the T.B. Davie Memorial Lecturer at the University of Cape Town in South Africa. Mr. De Kieweit explains the civil rights struggle in South Africa and explains that Dr. King's appearance would be of great help.

Invitation from J.G. Kennelly to MLK

J.G. Kennelly invites Dr. King to address the Christian Culture Forum during their 1963-1964 season in Hamilton, Canada.

Invitation from Robert S. Bilheimer to MLK to Attend a Consultation Seminar

Robert S. Bilheimer, Associate General Secretary for the World Council of Churches, invites Dr. King to attend a consultation on Christian Practices and Desirable Action in Social Change and Race Relations.

Invitation from the Council on Human Relations of Greater Atlanta Dinner Meeting

On behalf of the Council on Human Relations of Greater Atlanta, Chairman Mrs. John W. Stanley extends an invitation to an upcoming dinner meeting where Mrs. Eliza Paschall, Executive Director of the Community Relations Commission of the City of Atlanta, will be honored. Morehouse College President Emeritus Dr. Benjamin E. Mays is scheduled to discuss "Black Power versus White Power" with the attendees.

Invitation from the United States Commission on Civil Rights

Dr. king is invited to participate in the National Conference on Race and Education by the United States Commission on Civil Rights.

It is Not Enough to Condemn Black Power...

Dr. King addresses the "Black Power" movement in this two-page document. He also explains his thoughts and experiences relating to the tactics and goals of the Civil Rights Movement.

Judith Ann Jones Writes Mr. Ralph Helstein Inquiring About Consideration for a Scholarship.

College Student Judith Ann Jones writes Ralph Helstein, President of United Packinghouse, Food and Allied Workers, about the Russell H. Bull Scholarship. She explains how she plans to use the scholarship to further encourage others to be more racially tolerant.

Justice Harlan Concurring

This newspaper article discusses John Marshall Harlan's dissent with the case of "Plessy vs. Ferguson," and how Harlan was not acknowledged when the case was overturned.

Justice in Mississippi

Dora McDonald records notes by Dr. King concerning an unjust ruling in Mississippi. He claims that more legislation is needed to enable the federal courts to prosecute these crimes.

Letter fom Edmond Jansson to the Members of the Senate Judiciary Committee

Edmond Jansson writes a letter to the members of the Senate Judiciary Committee contradicting a report on how Roy Wilkins was treated in Salt Lake City, Utah. A copy was sent to Dr. King.

Letter form Pedro A. Otero Fernandez & Dora E. Cartagen to MLK

The Rio Piedras' Lawyers Association of Puerto Rico congratulates Dr. King for his receipt of the Nobel Peace Prize. They express how they share Dr. King's same beliefs regarding the three great evils of mankind and hope to spread the movement under his leadership throughout the world.

Letter from "A Southerner" to MLK

This letter, signed by, "A Southerner", suggests that Dr. King persuade Black people to return to Africa.

Letter from a Fellow American to MLK

This anonymous author expresses his concern regarding SNCC; explaining that the organization and its leaders have a communist backing. The author closes the letter with references to jobs, education, and a list of several small countries in need of assistance.

Letter from A High School Student

A white high school student writes Dr. King to encourage the continuation of demonstrations to free the Negro people.

Letter from a Lithuanian American to MLK

In this letter to Dr. King, a Lithuanian immigrant to the United States writes that he agrees with the campaign for Negro rights and believes that all U.S. citizens should be treated equally.

Letter from A Republican to MLK

Signing as "A Republican," the writer informs Dr. King that the draft for the war is the Democrats' method of using blacks for involuntary servitude. This information is to serve as support of the writer's belief that the Democrats will "return the negroes to slavery."

Letter from A White Man to MLK

Writing under a pseudonym, "A White Man" lectures Dr. King about the race related conditions of the Chicago Park District. He or she calls this area "Heaven on Earth Surrounded by a Ghetto."

Letter from A. Phillip Randolph to MLK

Mr. Randolph addresses his concerns with current events that could potentially harm the Civil Rights Movement. His list of developments includes Malcolm X's promotion of rifle clubs, the use of propaganda tactics to separate white people from the Civil Rights Movement, the increasing totalitarian influence on protest groups in northern cities and demagogic leadership that creates confusion and frustration. Mr. Randolph requests a meeting to discuss how to address these issues.

Letter from A. S. Young to MLK

Mr. Young criticizes Dr. King and the black community for their support of heavyweight champion Cassius Clay's refusal to be drafted into the military. He also expresses worry about the quality of black leadership and urges a move from a selfish focus on Negroes only to concern for all people.

Letter from A. T. Walden to MLK

A . T. Walden writes to Dr. King congratulating him on the performance of the SCLC lead program featuring the singing and acting of Harry Belafonte. Walden continues to express his belief by stating that the Reverend fills a unique role in the American dream of brotherhood and equality.

Letter from A. White to MLK

A. White reprimands the public use of fire hydrants and urges Dr. King to educate his "people" to avoid such actions.

Letter from A.C. Spectorsky to MLK

Editorial Director, A.C. Spectorsky, requests comments from Dr. King regarding an interview with Senator Charles Percy from the April issue of PLAYBOY Magazine. The Illinois Republican
discusses a range of subjects including American military presence in Vietnam, President Lyndon B. Johnson's leadership style, and Negro-white relations.

Letter from Abby Seldes to MLK

Young Abby Seldes writes Dr. King to inform him of how inspirational his words are. Seldes mentions that she is a 12-years-old from Pennsylvania and an avid supporter of Dr. King's leadership. She also discusses her parents' participation in the March on Washington.

Letter from Abdul Razak Ahmad to MLK

Abdul Razak Ahmad requests a message of support from Dr. King for an upcoming event. Ahmad is the president of the University of Singapore's Socialist Club. This letter praises Dr. King for his leadership and also discusses racial problems in Singapore.

Letter from Alfred A. Haesler to MLK

Alfred A. Haesler of Die Tat or "the fact," a publication in Switzerland, asks Dr. King a series of questions that revolve around the role of hatred in American politics.

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