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Civil Rights Movements

Associated Archive Content : 594 results

Letter from A. William Loos to James Farmer

A. William Loos expresses his agreement with the actions of the recipient, James Farmer, which lead to the reconsideration of a vote to remove United States troops from Vietnam.

Letter from A.C. Spectorsky to MLK

Editorial Director, A.C. Spectorsky, requests comments from Dr. King regarding an interview with Senator Charles Percy from the April issue of PLAYBOY Magazine. The Illinois Republican
discusses a range of subjects including American military presence in Vietnam, President Lyndon B. Johnson's leadership style, and Negro-white relations.

Letter from A.J. de Witte to Roy Wilkins

A.J. de Witte conveys his dissatisfaction to Roy Wilkins over the NAACP's criticism of Dr. King's opposition to the Vietnam War. De Witte withdraws his financial support to the NAACP, instead contributing to Dr. King, Stokley Carmichael of SNCC and Floyd McKissick of CORE.

Letter from Abram Eisenman to MLK

Abram Eisenman expresses appreciation and admiration for Dr. King's work. Eisenman also
addresses the divide of supporters within the Civil Rights Movement concerning the Vietnam War.

Letter from Alfred Gunn to MLK

Alfred L. Gunn requests Dr King's support of Gunn's "new Democratic way of Philosophy." Mr. Dunn also encloses three manuscripts pertaining to riots, the American gun and rifle laws, and the occurrence of racial problems in America.

Letter from Alice Sargent to MLK

Alice Sargent, the Assistant Director of Student Activities at Temple University, inquires what role the students can play in the Civil Rights Movement and sends a sample of one of the students' editorials.

Letter from Andre Katz to MLK

Andrea Katz, editor of Quadrangle Books, informs Dr. King about a book titled, "Where to, Black Man?" It is a diary of an African American man, Ed Smith, who traveled to Africa to reaffirm his American identity.

Letter from Anna Hedgeman to MLK

Dr. Hedgeman writes Dr. King to express her support for Dr. King's quality service that he has given America. He then targets Dr. King on a letter he received on the representation of the slogan "Black Power." Dr. Hedgeman feels the slogan relates strongly towards extremists and black supremacy. Lastly, she encloses a small contribution and two letters.

Letter from Arnold Krakower to MLK

Attorney Arnold Krakower explains to Dr. King the reasons why he must reject a financial appeal to aid the SCLC. According to Krakower, Dr. King's position in the civil rights movement gave him high notoriety. However, once Dr. King turned his attention to oppose the war in Vietnam, Krakower believes he has no choice but to object mixing civil rights and foreign policy.

Letter from Asbury Howard to MLK Regarding Union Merger

Mr. Howard, Vice President of International Union of Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers, informs Dr. King of negotiations for the merger of his organization's union and the United Steelworkers of America. If successful, this merger would strengthen the civil rights and labor movements in the South.

Letter from Baptist World Alliance to MLK

Baptist World Alliance Church expresses its gratitude to Dr. King for his visit to the Amsterdam Conference, and follows up with a reminder of his promise to consider an invitation from Scandinavia.

Letter from Bayard Rustin to MLK

Bayard Rustin writes to Dr. King inviting him to attend a conference sponsored by the A. Philip Randolph Education Fund. The conference focuses on "The Role of Press in a Period of Social Crisis."

Letter from Bill Kunstler to MLK

Famed civil rights attorney William Kunstler states that this was the first time a federal court enjoined prosecution of contempt cases under a state injunction. He would like to use the same procedures in Mississippi.

Letter from Bond R. Faulwell to MLK

Faulwell, a freshman at Grinnell College, is writing a term paper on civil rights for a political science course and requests advice from Dr. King as an "acknowledged leader" of the protest movement.

Letter from British High School Student to MLK

Margaret Blenkins, a fifteen year old student from Northumberland, England, writes Dr. King to ask how she can join the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from C. L. Swartzentruber to MLK

School Superintendent C. L. Swartzentruber invites Dr. King to speak at Central Christian High School for their Fourth Annual Lecture-Music Series. He also congratulates Dr. King on being "Time's Man of the Year" and states that, as Mennonites, they are particularly interested in his nonviolent strategy.

Letter from Carey McWilliams to Dora McDonald

Carey McWilliams writes Dora McDonald acknowledging confirmation of Dr. King's commitment to speak for "The Nation's" conference in Los Angeles.

Letter from Carey McWilliams to MLK

Carey McWilliams, Editor of "The Nation," reminds Dr. King that it is nearly time to publish his annual article. McWilliams also requests that the timing of the article correspond with the beginning of the new session of Congress.

Letter from Carlos G. Randall to MLK

Carlos Randall writes Dr. King expressing that he once really liked him, but now he is unsure due to King's stance on Vietnam. He asserts "So now the USA is a purveyor of violence?" and asks if Dr. King believed that he would be able to give a similar speech in Moscow or Pekin and still freely receive his letter.

Letter from Charles Crawford to MLK

Charles S. Crawford expresses his dissent with Dr. King on a variety of subjects, one specifically his stance towards President Johnson and the concept of civil disobedience.

Letter from Charlie Cheese Carsons to Rev. Andrew Young

Charlie Cheese Carsons addresses Rev. Andrew Young to provide him with a painting that expresses the Civil Rights Movement and the fight for human dignity. Mr. Carsons is aware that Dr. King's attention has more important concerns which explains his reasoning for contacting Rev. Young. In addition to the painting, Mr. Carsons attaches his perceptions of prominent African Americans who served as his inspiration.

Letter from Chuck Mittlestadt to MLK

Mr. Miittlestadt praises Dr. King for utilizing the "Gandhian technique of Satygagraha" in the Civil Rights Movement. He relates Dr. King to Mahatma Gandhi and Prime Minister of India, Jawaharlal Nehru. Mr. Mittlestadt also discusses the downfall of CORE, encloses a donation, and requests a photograph of Dr. King.

Letter from Congressman Augustus F. Hawkins to MLK

Augustus Hawkins, the first black Congressman from California, asks Dr. King to offer suggestions and comments about how to further the aims of the Economic Opportunity Act of 1964. Hawkins reports that the act has garnered resistance from local political leadership because many fear it will undermine their power.

Letter from Constance A. Price to MLK

In this letter, Ms. Price writes to Dr. King to request that he makes mention of the blatant injustices committed by the State of Colorado, to its citizens, during the "poor people's campaign" in Washington, D.C.

Letter from Cornell E. Talley to MLK

Cornell E. Talley, Pastor of New Light Baptist Church, tells Dr. King that his church is withdrawing their pledge of $100 per month to the SCLC. Talley felt as if Dr. King was no longer fighting for civil rights, and that his leadership of anti-war demonstrations was counterproductive.

Letter from Courtland Cox to MLK

Courtland Cox of SNCC writes Dr. King reminding him that several of their members are away in Africa and informs him that Mr. Lewis will not be able to attend his convention.

Letter from Cryssana Jenkins Bogner to MLK

Mrs. Cryssana Jenkins Bogner writes Dr. King with to both support his leadership in the Civil Rights Movement, and to share her discontent with Executive Director of the NAACP Roy Wilkin's stance on the Vietnam War.

Letter from David J. Dennis to MLK

In this letter, David Dennis requests a letter of reference from Dr. King, prior to his draft board meeting, so to challenge an induction into the armed forces.

Letter from David L. Clark and Charles E. Young to MLK

David Clark and Charles E. Young of the University of California Los Angeles write to Dr. King to ask him to speak to the UCLA student body. They express that their students are very interested in the Civil Rights Movement and have planned an entire "Selma Week" to correspond with his speech and raise money for the Selma Movement.

Letter from Dennis Crawford to MLK

Dennis Crawford, Executive Secretary of the YMCA-YWCA, invites Dr. King to the first Northwest Collegiate Civil Rights Conference. In addition, Crawford makes mention of their contributions to the movement in the form of students, money, books and community leadership.

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