Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Martin Luther King, Jr. - Political and Social Views

Associated Archive Content : 447 results

Letter from Donald Lincoln Cook to MLK

Donald Cook lauds Dr. King's efforts to persuade military forces to leave Vietnam. In response to a speech on Vietnam given by Dr. King, Cook agrees that "the Negro should have special interest in the plight of the Vietnamese." He further encourages Dr. King to stand firm in his position to bring a moral conscience to the nation.

Letter from Donald Louis Anderson to MLK

Donald Louis Anderson, member of the Democratic Party in Pittsburgh, writes to Dr. King to request his endorsement of their political movement in the South.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Irvine I. Turner

Dora McDonald explains to Irvine Turner that Dr. King is unable to endorse political candidates due to the "non-partisan nature" of the SCLC.

Letter from Dora McDonald to L. N. W. Christian

Dora McDonald writes Mr. Christian on Dr. King's behalf. She acknowledges his disagreement with Dr. King's philosophy and refers him to Dr. King's "Letter from Birmingham Jail" for answers to his questions.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Miss Rankin at the US Justice Department

Dora McDonald sends Miss Rankin of the Justice Department a copy of a statement made by Dr. King before the Republican Party. The statement was in reference to his proposed "Bill of Rights for the Disadvantaged."

Letter from Doug Dodge to MLK

Mr. Doug Dodge writes Dr. King to request his help in identifying an appropriate role in the Civil Rights Movement for a young white male who is seeking to get involved.

Letter from Douglas B. Leeds to MLK

Douglas Leeds, Campus Coordinator for Choice '68 at Babson Institute of Business Administration, writes Dr. King to request any information regarding his political views. He also invites Dr. King to speak at the Institute in the future.

Letter from E. Rawley to MLK

E. Rawley writes Dr. King stating, "you are judged by the company you keep." Furthermore, Rawley asserts that King will end up a "nothing" when he is on the brink of fame and respect.

Letter from Edward Boland to MLK

Representative Edward P. Boland informs Dr. King of his signing of the Discharge Petition for Home Rule in the District of Columbia.

Letter from Eldredge Hiller to MLK

Mr. Eldredge, Executive Director of The American Association of Fund-Raising Counsel, writes Dr. King to express criticism of a statement made in an SCLC fact leaflet regarding "commercial fund raisers." Eldredge states that, while many people in his Association are usually sympathetic to Dr. King's views, the "distasteful" sentiment is exception.

Letter from Eleanor A. Lofton of the Pittsburgh Courier to MLK

Eleanor Lofton, Acting Publisher for the Pittsburgh Courier, asks Dr. King to include a message for the "Brotherhood" edition of their publication. Lofton explains that they are seeking "all men of goodwill" to be a part of the edition and that they will be anticipating his timely response.

Letter from Eleanor Lawrence to MLK

Eleanor Lawrence thanks Dr. King for his bold opposition to the Vietnam War. She understands that Dr. King's views transcend all across the globe and believes that Dr. King would make a perfect peace candidate for President in the 1968 elections.

Letter from Ethel T. Elsea to MLK

Ethel Elsea, Assistant Editor at the Fleming H. Revell Company, requests Dr. King's permission to use a quotation for a book by Frank S. Mead.

Letter from Eugen Bosch to MLK

Eugen Bosch writes to Dr. King to tell him that, "As always, King was rational and understanding and put the whole thing in the right perspective." Bosch is hopeful that Dr. King will help James Meredith, who had decided to run for Congress in a special election against the incumbent, Adam Clayton Powell, Jr.

Letter from Eugene Jackson to MLK

Eugene Jackson expresses his amazement with Dr. King's superb performance during his interview on "Meet the Press."

Letter from Floyd Henderson to MLK

Floyd B. Henderson informs Dr. King that he supports African Americans as a whole. He proceeds to ask him to help elect Richard Nixon for President.

Letter from Frank Annunzio to MLK

Frank Annunzio informs Dr. King that he appreciates his views on the Mississippi Delegation. Annunzio states that he voted to remove the seniority status of the Mississippi Congressmen "from their respective Committees."

Letter from Frank Thompson, Jr. to MLK

Congressman Thompson of New Jersey writes Dr. King to acknowledge his recent letter urging his support of the vote against the Mississippi Delegation. Thompson informs Dr. King that he was one of Representatives who opposed the seating, and although dissenters did not prevail he is convinced "that this action has helped in the fight to enfranchise those who have been discriminated against for so long."

Letter from Frederick E. Wallin to MLK

Frederick E. Wallin, of Alderson-Broaddus College, invites Dr. King to debate Fulton Lewis III. The debate will be sponsored by the Young Americans for Freedom. Television and radio coverage will also be available.

Letter From George Patton Jr. to MLK

George Patton expresses his disdain to Dr. King about the names that whites call "Black Americans" and offers a list of names that blacks should be "referred to as."

Letter from Gerhard Amendt to MLK

Gerhard Amendt of the West German Radio Corporation expresses his interest in having Dr. King give his opinion of the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Gerhard Ruoff to MLK

Gerhard Ruoff inquires about Dr. King and his nonviolent philosophy. Ruoff desires to know how King will respond if violence faces him.

Letter from Gordon Allott to MLK

Gordon Alliot, a member of the United States Senate, sends his appreciation to Dr. King for his endorsement for a position on the "historic civil rights bill."

Letter from Gulf Oil Corporation to MLK

Craig Thompson, Director of Public Relations, informs Dr. King of Gulf Oil's discontent regarding the confusion of objectives surrounding his role as a world peacemaker. He informs Dr. King that their continued support will be provided to other respected Negro organizations "devoting their energies to the fundamental issues of the Negro's place in America."

Letter from Hal Mason to MLK

Hal Mason, campaign chairman for Choice "68, requests that Dr. King send any materials pertaining to Dr. King's potential candidacy.

Letter from Harris McDowell, Jr. to MLK

Representative Harris McDowell, Jr. writes Dr. King stating that he voted against seating the Mississippi delegation. McDowell states, "I appreciate having your views regarding this important problem."

Letter from Harry B. Henderson Jr. to MLK

Harry Henderson writes Dr. King in support of Dr. King's stance on Vietnam. Henderson expresses his appreciation for Dr. King's "clearout and moving" speech regarding the United State's presence in Vietnam and he feels that only clergymen can take an effective stance. He also discusses how the Vietnam War is used as a scapegoat to keep the government from having to deal with discrimination issues in America.

Letter from Helen White to MLK

Ms. White seeks the opinion of Dr. King for her research on American Aristocracy.

Letter from Henrietta Buckmaster to MLK

Henrietta Buckmaster expresses her admiration for Dr. King's stance on the war in Vietnam.

Letter from Henry Darby to Edward Brooke

Henry Darby, a student at Atlanta University asks for information about Dr. King's involvement in the Vietnam War.

Pages