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Civil Rights

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Article Briefly Summarizing MLK's Life, Leadership and Accomplishments

This article acknowledges the many accomplishments made by Dr. King. The writer cites the various highlights of Dr. King's work and maintains "...America will never be the same."

Article Concerning Race Relation in Mississippi

In this article the author, Scott B. Smith, highlights two Civil Rights Workers who were recently released from prison in Madison county, Mississippi. Mr. Smith discusses the role of race in legal procedures and the community.

Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy on House Resolution 7152

Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy comments on House Bill 7152, the bill that eventually culminated in the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Kennedy argues that the bill is a "test" to white Americans and that it must "effectively eliminate racial discrimination in voting, education and in employment." He addresses the eleven titles of the bill and describes the differences between the current bill and the version introduced by the president. Kennedy finally asserts that if the bill is not passed, then "the whole nation will be the loser."

Awake America

A poem by Jerry Peace calls for Americans to wake up and address current world issues.

Bayard Rustin Statement on Schwerner, Goodman and Chaney

Baynard Rustin notes the recent violence against three Negro male volunteers in the voter registration drive. Mr. Rustin describes the death of these men as acts that violate the "constitutional rights" of the Negro people. In the hopes of Mr. Rustin, this occurence will initiate a new force of the nonviolent movement.

Biographical Sketch of Dr. Ralph David Avernathy

This biographical sketch of Dr. Abernathy outlines his positions, recognitions, education, travel experience and personal life. Dr. Abernathy served as President of the SCLC after Dr. King's death and also served as a member of the NAACP, and Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity, Inc.

Birmingham Jail

Reverend Robert J. Leuver sends Dr. King an article titled "Birmingham Jail.". In the article, Harry Cargas learns that there are some members of the police force who support the Civil Rights Movement, but are too fearful to speak out against the racial atrocities. It was here that Mr. Cargas realized the ongoing struggle for outspoken and silent supporters of the movement for social change.

Black Caucus of Eastern Airlines

The Black Caucus of Eastern Airlines sponsored, Future Impact, a program to promote economic development for the company. The program also aids in enhancing the skills of the company's black employees.

Black Power

This is a chapter sermon for Dr. King's book "Where Do We Go From Here?" The civil rights leader traces the early development of Black Power and its eventual surge onto the national political scene. Though understood as a direct opposition to the nonviolent movement that organizations like SCLC, CORE, and SNCC originally supported, King describes Black Power as a "disappointment wrapped in despair."

Blue Spiral Notebook

Contained in this notebook is a draft of Dr. King's statement to Judge James E. Webb following his arrest during the Rich's Magnolia Tea Room Sit-In. There is also an outline of a letter to female students who were arrested during the sit-in. On other pages a child practices handwriting.

Board of Christian Social Concerns of the Methodist Church Concerns on Vietnam

The Board of Christian Social Concerns are troubled by the events transpiring in Vietnam. They believe that such violence cannot be God's will and offer their solutions on how to end the war. They also applaud Dr. King for his views and words concerning the war.

Board of National Missions Writes the Editors of the Washington Post

George E. Todd, G. H. Jack Woodard, and Joseph W. Merchant send a letter to the Editors of the Washington Post regarding the Mississippi Action for Progress. They claim the organization is a tool for the destruction of the Child Development Group of Mississippi. Additional allegations are made that MAP was an instrument of the governor and legislature of Mississippi to stall school integration.

Bold Design for a New South

Dr. King notes that civil rights has been replaced as the "Number One" domestic issue, dwarfed by the Cuban missile crisis, trade legislation and tax reform. He attributes this to public acceptance of tokenism as well as an overly cautious administration. While acknowledging that the administration has made greater efforts on civil rights than previous ones, Dr. King says the progress is constricted and confined.

Boston Sunday Herald: Martin King Discusses. . .

In Boston Sunday Herald article, Dr. King shares his views on mayoral candidate Mrs. Louise Day Hicks, Senator Edward Brooke, and the President's stance on the Vietnam War. Dr. King is adamant enough on the latter issue that he remarks he may change his policy regarding neutrality in elections.

Bread at Midnight

"The Mennonite," issued by The Board of Education and Publication of the General Conference Mennonite Church, features an article by Dr. King entitled "Bread at Night." Dr. King begins with a parable that demonstrates not only the power of prayer, but provides metaphors for the state of America and thinking material for the role of the church during that time period.

Catholics Involved in Integration

Members of Catholics Involved in Integration write a letter to solicit membership to their organization. The cost to join the group is one dollar per month. The funds raised are donated to Dr. King in support of his efforts to gain peace, freedom, and equality.

CEP News

The Citizenship Education Program of the SCLC, in cooperation with the American Missionary Association issue this periodic publication that includes updates of the organization's progress, current events and other news of interest.

Check from New York Times Company to MLK

The New York Times company presents Dr. King with a $400 check for his article on civil rights.

Chicago Freedom Movement Tent-In

This flyer outlines the platform for the Chicago Freedom Movement's Tent-In. This organization, based out of Warrenville, Illinois, sought for equality in housing and was an initiative of the SCLC and Al Raby's Council of Federated Organizations.

CIC Press Release: Hilliard to Head Catholic Testimonial for MLK

The Catholic Interracial Council releases a statement announcing Raymond M. Hilliard as the Chairman of the 1964 John F. Kennedy Award Dinner. During the event, Dr. King will be honored for his leadership and dedication to the civil rights struggle. Hilliard, whom President Johnson named to the National Citizens Committee for Community Relations to advise on the implementation of civil rights legislation, called Dr. King's work "inspired and truly Christian" and said that the CIC was honored to celebrate him.

Citizenship Education Proposal

SCLC's Citizenship Education Program issues a five year proposal for the period between 1965 and 1970. The proposal outlines previous successful activities since the inception of the program.

Civil Rights Act of 1957

The Civil Rights Act was signed into law on September 9, 1957 by President Dwight D. Eisenhower. Commonly referred to as the Civil Rights Act of 1957, this was the first such federal law since Reconstruction. The law was aimed at ending voter discrimination tactics such as poll taxes and literacy tests, but it also created the Civil Rights Commission to ensure proper administration of the law.

Civil Rights Photographic Series

These fifteen photographs chronicle several historical moments in the Civil Rights Movement.

Civil Rights Symposium Program

This document is a program from a symposium workshop on national and local civil rights challenges.

Civil-Righters Isolation

David Lawrence states that the recent initiatives of Negro leaders are hindering the overall mission of the Civil Rights Movement. He believes that Negro groups are defeating their own cause.

Commentary on MLK Article

This article describes Dr. King's approval of a recent civil rights ordinance passing in Gary, Indiana. The purpose of the ordinance is to prohibit discrimination in the sale, rental, leasing or financing of real estate. Dr. King thanks the community and members of the City Council for making the ordinance possible.

Condolence Letter Regarding Assassination of MLK

Anabella Anderson discusses the sadness that she feels over Dr. King's assassination. She says that she grieves for his family and the conditions that brought about Dr. King's death. Ashamed of her white skin, she blames the white race for social ills. Ms. Anderson wants to give of her self to non-whites in America and those under white domination in Africa. Though saddened, she is comforted by the words she heard at Dr. King's funeral and is hopeful that his legacy will live on.

Congressional Record Regarding Antipoverty Funding

This Congressional Record documents a statement regarding the antipoverty bill. The statement, made to the public by the Leadership Conference on Civil Rights, urged Congress to support funding towards eradicating poverty for both black and white citizens.

Convocation on Equal Justice Under the Law

This is a transcript of remarks made by Dr. King at the Convocation on Equal Justice Under Law, sponsored by the NAACP Legal Defense Fund on May 28, 1964.

Coretta's Personal Story

This telegram, dictated to Charles L. Sanders on the way back from the Nobel Peace Prize Award ceremony, contains Mrs. Coretta Scott King's sentimental narrative of her acclaimed relationship with Dr. King. Revealing details that range from their meeting in 1951 through twelve years of marriage, Mrs. King admits she was immediately smitten by Dr.

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