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Student Movements

Associated Archive Content : 115 results

Letter from Gary L. Garber to MLK from Grace College

Gary L. Gerber writes Dr. King concerning Grace College's participation in Choice '68, which is a National Presidential Primary sponsored by Time Magazine.

Letter from Henry L. Gerner to MLK

Henry Gerner applauds Dr. King on his accomplishments and what he is doing for the Civil Rights Movement. He also invites Dr. King to speak at Bowling Green State University, a request that is echoed in a letter from Donald Stricker.

Letter from J. R. Coan to Alumni of Turner Theological Seminary

Mr. Coan, acting director of Turner Theological Seminary at the Interdenominational Theological Center, issued this correspondence to all of Turner Theological Seminary's Alumni. The letter announces the details and record of minutes for the Seminary's Third Annual Founders' Day Convocation.

Letter from James E. Byrd to MLK

James E. Byrd, Campus Coordinator at Lenoir Rhyne College, writes Dr. King requesting materials for the Choice '68 campaign.

Letter from James Shipman to MLK

James Shipman writes Dr. King to request his presence at the 1st annual meeting for the Education Association for Community-Junior Colleges, as their main speaker. Shipman gives the Reverend option to choose a date convenient for him, a week in either direction from April 20, 1968.

Letter from John Lewis to MLK

In this letter, John Lewis requests a loan for the amount of $10,000 from the Southern Christian Leadership Conference so that the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee can meet their payroll and cover pressing bills. He then speaks on the importance of continuous dialogue between the SCLC and SNCC.

Letter from John Moorman to MLK

John Moorman, President of the Student Christian Association at Guilford College, invites Dr. King to be the speaker for their Religious Emphasis Week in April of 1968. Moorman discusses details of the arrangement, including Dr. King's honorarium and travel expenses.

Letter from Julian Bond to MLK

Julian Bond, a member of the Georgia House of Representatives, encloses a memorandum that proposes that the Atlanta Student Movement performs the following actions: "educate and involve the community, convince the Atlanta Board of Education that 'everyone cares,' and force action from the Board."

Letter from Linda Gillies to MLK

Chairman of the Choice '68 Steering Committee, Linda Gillies asks Dr. King about his stance on referendum issues. Topics that Dr. King was asked to respond to included King's opinion on what military action the U.S. should have in Vietnam, the course of action the US should pursue regarding bombing North Vietnam and governmental spending.

Letter from Margo Belden to MLK

Margo Belden inquires about materials from Dr. King for Choice '68, the national collegiate presidential primary.

Letter from Mark Henderson to MLK

In this letter Mark Henderson comments on the incidents at the South Carolina State College in Orangeburg, South Carolina known as the Orangeburg Massacre.

Letter from Mark Raphael to MLK

Mark Raphael, the President of the All-Square Student Congress Speaker's Bureau at New York University, invites Dr. King to talk about his priorities in America and plans for Washington.

Letter from Mary T. Clark to MLK

This letter from the Social Action Secretariat, National Federation of Catholic College Students references an enclosed letter which was issued to all member colleges. The enclosed letter supports student activity in the 1964 Freedom Fast.

Letter From MLK to Mr. Berkowitz

Dr. King responds to a request for information regarding demonstrations in Montgomery.

Letter from MLK to Peter Mansfield

Dr. King accepts the invitation extended by Peter Mansfield, Acting President of the National Union of South African Students, to give the opening address for the organization's 41st Annual Congress at the University of Natal in South Africa.

Letter from MLK to Rev. H. Edward Whitaker

Dr. King responds to a letter from Rev. Edward Whitaker, regarding Whitaker's desire to be a college minster. He expresses to Whitaker that his experience should serve him well for such a responsibility. Dr. King and Rev. Whitaker were classmates at Crozer Theological Seminary.

Letter from MLK to Susan Rowland

Dr. King informs Susan Roland, a member of the Student Christian Movement at the University of Western Ontario, that due to numerous commitments, he will be unable to accept the invitation to speak at the institution.

Letter from Mrs. G. E. Finch to Mr. M. Nance, Jr.

This letter, dated February 16, 1968, was written to Mr. M. Nance, Jr. from Mrs. Finch. In this letter, she states that while the situation in Orangeburg is "regrettable" it can be fixed. She says that other ethnic groups would not lead demonstrations as blacks have. She says black people lack "imagination and energy''. Finch states that while she believes blacks have suffered "grievances, she has contempt for so-called "free loaders".

Letter from Nathaniel L. Hawthorne to MLK

Nathaniel Lee Hawthorne, who describes himself as “a nonviolent militant Negro” from rural Virginia, asks Dr. King for advice on publishing a book. Hawthorne wants to tell the nation what it feels like to be poor

Letter from Rev. John B. Morris to MLK

Rev. John B. Morris writes Dr. King while he is in the city jail in Atlanta, Georgia. Morris asserts that Dr. King's stay in jail will "renew strength to the student movement."

Letter from Reverend J. F. McMillan to MLK

Reverend J. F. McMillan communicates with Reverend Artic Harris to discuss the sponsoring of Mrs. King in a recital for the three Negro Churches in Toronto. They have requested Dr. King to be the principal speaker for their 140th anniversary services. Reverend McMillan informs Dr. King that he is "interested" in the non-violent movement.

Letter from Ronald F. Jockers and Ronald Schlossman to MLK

Ronald Jockers and Ronald Schlossman write Dr. King inviting him to participate in the National Collegiate Presidential Primary Choice of 1968.

Letter from Samuel G. Jackson

Mr. Jackson requests assistance with the Minority Youth in a Higher Education project. This particular project is aimed at increasing the number of black and Puerto Rican students at predominantly white institutions.

Letter from Sandra A. Lonsfoote to MLK

Sandra A. Lonsfoote, Campus Coordinator at Bethel College, writes Dr. King requesting campaign information for the Choice 68' campaign.

Letter from Secretary to Daniel C. Thompson

Dr. King's Secretary writes Dr. Daniel Thompson of Howard University and encloses a foreword written by Dr. King, discussing violence and the philosophies of Mahatma Gandhi.

Letter from Stanley Newman to MLK Regarding National Coalition for a New Congress

Newman writes that, given the recent passage of the 1964 Civil Rights Bill, a national coalition needs to be created to support and enforce it. Understanding the limitations of Congress, the new coalition would focus on transforming Congress to better support the needs of the underprivileged and oppressed.

Letter from Student Mobilization Committee

The Student Mobilization Committee petitions for help to protest the war in Vietnam.

Letter from Student Supporter Richard Hathaway to MLK

Richard Hathaway, a student at Haverford College, requests a copy of a speech Dr. King delivered at the United Nations Plaza. Hathaway was a participant in the march and rally at which Dr. King spoke, but was unable to hear the speech because of the crowd.

Letter from William Caspe and Bruce Fleegler to MLK

William Caspe and Bruce Fleeger, representatives of the Northern Student Movement at Brandies University, inform Dr. King of their past civil rights efforts with Negroes in the south and their upcoming "Fast for Freedom" event. They request Dr. King's written endorsement of the program and ask that he encourage others to participate.

Letter From William N. Goldsmith to MLK

William N. Goldsmith informs Dr. King of funds that were collected at Brandeis University for the SCLC. Mr. Goldsmith also apologizes for Dr. King having to bear so much of the load in Birmingham.

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