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Black Power

The term Black Power was first popularly used by Student Nonviolent
Coordinating Committee (SNCC) organizers Stokely Carmichael (a.k.a.
Kwame Toure) and Willie Ricks (a.k.a. Mukasa Dada) at the 1966 March
Against Fear. As a political movement of the late 1960s and early
1970s, it denoted a range of ideologies. Proponents of Black Power
tended to be in conflict with the mainstream Civil Rights Movement.
Organizations such as SNCC, the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE) and
later the Black Panther Party publicly renounced emphasis on
integration and nonviolent protest and instead adopted militant
language to emphasize race pride and the formation of autonomous
political and cultural institutions to promote black collective
interests. The term “Black is Beautiful” and the Black
Arts Movement are generally associated with the concept.

Associated Archive Content : 165 results

Letter from Mrs. William Henry Slakey to MLK

Mrs. Slakey writes Dr. King to commend his letter denouncing the term "Black Power." In the post script, she requests a personal response instead of a form letter.

Letter from Ms. Joan Daves to MLK about a Publication

In this letter Joan Daves requests Dr. King's input on his chapter, "Black Power." Daves also inquires as to which magazine to send the manuscript first and suggests first sending it to "Life" magazine.

Letter from Myron A. Hoyt to MLK about Financial and Moral Support

In this letter Myron A. Hoyt, of the Synod of South Dakota, sends a financial contribution to the SCLC and comments on Dr. King's reaction to the Black Power Movement.

Letter from Paul Eshelman to MLK

Mr. Eshelman writes to Dr. King in support of his efforts toward helping African Americans become "first class citizens."

Letter from Philip Harnden to MLK

After reading Dr. King's book, "Why We Can't Wait," Philip Harnden, a sophomore at Wheaton College, writes Dr. King expressing his newly changed insight on the Negro struggle. Mr. Harnden inquires about Dr. King's nonviolent approach and the black community beginning to abandon nonviolence by adopting more aggressive means to achieve their goals.

Letter from Reverend Durstan R. McDonald to MLK Regarding an Invitation

The Hobart and William Smith Colleges have brought influential leaders to their campus from the civil rights and black power movements. Many students desire a further understanding of the Gospel and have requested to invite Dr. King to speak. The dates provided for this engagement are unfortunately subsequent to the assignation of Dr. King.

Letter from Robert Stark to President Johnson

Mr. Stark sends the President his views on Liberty and Justice for All, calling programs designed to benefit Negroes a "farce," denouncing Negro lack of responsibility and claiming that it is civil rights not the Vietnam War that is expensive. He is upset that there is so much media focus on blacks and believes it is time to insist upon white rights.

Letter from Susan Neisuler to MLK

Susan Neisuler encourages Dr. King to speak out against anti-semitism, for there are many Jews who believe that "black power" means anti-semitism.

Letter from Thomas Johnson to MLK

Thomas Johnson, managing editor for 'The Forum' at Fisk University, explains that a new chapter of SNCC has recently been charted at the school. Johnson also requests that Dr. King write an editorial for their next publication.

Letter from Tommie Crockett to MLK

Tommie Crockett expresses his appreciation for the work of Dr. King. He explains that black people are getting tired of the nonviolence method and are beginning to embrace the term, "Black Power." He explains that blacks will no longer participate in peaceful civil rights demonstrations because, "we already done that."

Letter from W. B. Blix to MLK

W. B. Blix writes to Dr. King to express his support of the Civil Rights Movement. However, Blix also informs Dr. King that he has lost his support because of Dr. King's preemptive decision to commit civil disobedience if the Poor People's March on Washington is unsuccessful.

Letter of Support from Vivian Gourevitch to MLK

Supporter Vivian Gourevitch writes Dr. King to stress her belief that "Black Power" is a dangerous slogan.

Letter Regarding Politics

The author discusses political issues regrading the president and political parties. In addition, the author suggests that Black Power leaders should obtain positions within the "nut house" and the NAACP should support these appointments.

Letter Regarding the Emergency Convocation of the Urban Coalition

A letter drafted by Andrew Heiskell and A. Philip Randolph, co-Chairmen of the Urban Coalition. includes article clippings from various newspapers discussing the dire need for public service employment, private employment, educational disparities, reconstruction and urban development, and equal housing opportunities.

Letter to A.C. Skinner from Rev. Abernathy

Rev. Abernathy writes to inform Mr. Skinner of the crucial financial situation the SCLC is facing due to decreased contributor support after the "Black Power cry." He is asking the International Union of Mine Mill and Smelter Workers for a generous monetary contribution within the coming weeks.

Malcolm X Trio Still Marking Time Waiting for Trial

This article documents the legal aftermath of the assassination of Malcolm X on February 21, 1965. It also discusses the three men accused of the killing and reports comments made by the lawyers involved in the case.

Man's Struggle for Freedom

The "Chicago Tribune" reviews Dr. King's book "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?"

Meet the Press

This transcript of a special 90-minute edition of NBC’s Meet the Press features Dr. King and other prominent Negro civil rights leaders discussing the topics of war, nonviolence, integration, unemployment and black power. The program was aired on radio and television.

Memorandum from Benjamin F. Payton Regarding Meredith Mississippi March

Benjamin F. Payton, Executive Director of the Commission on Religion and Race of the National Council of Churches, constructs this document as a debriefing on the Meredith Mississippi March. It is evident that the march is symbolic of the nation's struggle with racial conflict and aims to dismantle fear among African American voter registration. James Meredith, Mississippi citizen and first African American to desegregate the University of Mississippi, had organized and led the march.

Memorandum to MLK about Black Power and the Marks of Slavery

This memorandum to Dr. King addresses the significance of black power and the marks of slavery. It also references excerpts from "The Peculiar Institution" by Kenneth Stampp.

MLK Address to the Tenth Anniversary Convention of the SCLC

Dr. King, at the Tenth Anniversary Convention of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, addresses numerous civil rights issues the organization is addressing throughout America.

MLK Speech at SCLC Staff Retreat

Dr. King addresses the staff of the SCLC at a retreat in Frogmore, South Carolina. He divides his speech into three parts: "whence we have come, where we have come, and where do we go from here." Dr. King thoroughly discusses his thoughts on Communism, the practice of nonviolence, the belief that racism is an "ontological affirmation,"and the weaknesses of Black Power.

Modern Day Samson

Radio Station WDIX in South Carolina broadcasts an editorial answering the question, "Why does the Negro attack his white neighbor?" Dr. King's book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community" serves as the primary reference, alluding to the discrimination reflected in the proportion of whites who would not support interracial relationship and any efforts of integration.

Monroe, Mich. News, "From the Book Bag"

A review of Dr. King's last book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?", was published by the Monroe, Michigan newspaper. The review outlined the positions Dr. King took on the Vietnam War and the Black Power movement. The author of this review considered Dr. King to be "an advocate-articulate, persistent and exhortative." Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" was published and released in 1967.

National Council of Churches Conference of Negro Leaders Opening Remarks

A. Philip Randolph makes remarks at the Conference of Negro Leaders National Council of Churches about the future of the Civil Rights Movement. Randolph expresses the importance of continuing the fight of social justice through civil rights, economics, housing and poverty.

Negro Leaders On "Meet the Press"

This is a transcription of the Meet the Press interview with Dr. King, Stokely Carmichael, Roy Wilkins, and other leaders representing civil rights organizations. The nationally broadcasted news segment covered many pertinent social topics including demonstrations and riots, city movements, the Vietnam War, and the progression of the Civil Rights Movement. The interview structure consisted of a panel, which prompted relevant questions, and moderator Edwin Newman.

Negro Leaders' Mistakes Hurting Civil Rights

In this article, David Lawrence explains his dissatisfaction with "Negro leaders" for supporting the actions of Adam Clayton Powell, who in Lawrence's mind, has abused his office and trust.

Negroes Are Not Moving Too Fast

In this article, Dr. King attempts to refute allegations that Negroes are moving too fast and expect special favors. He states, "the Negro is not going nearly fast enough."

New York Post: A Poor Show

The Child Development Group in Mississippi (CDGM) was a head start project created in 1965 with the help of a federally funded grant. The program not only specialized in child development, but sought to increase community involvement. In late 1966, Mississippi Senator Stennis "opened fire" on the program, charging those involved with malpractice. Consequently, Sargent Shiver, Director of the Office of Economic Opportunity, formed a "more respectable anti-poverty unity" called Mississippi Action for Progress to takeover CDGM.

News from Southern Conference Educational Fund

The SCEF Executive Board asserts that the attack of black power is injuring the plight of democracy in the United States. The SCEF board declared "the idea of black power has a long and honorable history but it is currently being misrepresented in the news media in the United States."

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