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Black Power

The term Black Power was first popularly used by Student Nonviolent
Coordinating Committee (SNCC) organizers Stokely Carmichael (a.k.a.
Kwame Toure) and Willie Ricks (a.k.a. Mukasa Dada) at the 1966 March
Against Fear. As a political movement of the late 1960s and early
1970s, it denoted a range of ideologies. Proponents of Black Power
tended to be in conflict with the mainstream Civil Rights Movement.
Organizations such as SNCC, the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE) and
later the Black Panther Party publicly renounced emphasis on
integration and nonviolent protest and instead adopted militant
language to emphasize race pride and the formation of autonomous
political and cultural institutions to promote black collective
interests. The term “Black is Beautiful” and the Black
Arts Movement are generally associated with the concept.

Associated Archive Content : 165 results

Letter from E. M. to MLK

E.M. writes Dr. King to share his opinion concerning future demonstrations.

Letter from Edward P. Gottlieb to Editor, New York Times

Edward P. Gottlieb writes to the Editor of the New York Times expressing his concern on racial pride. He begins by stating that racial pride is to be deplored and discouraged. Gettlieb concludes with the notion that an African American will feel free only after he is able to explore his own history and culture so he may take from it what he wants for his personal enhancement.

Letter from Edward Wright to MLK

Edward Wright, a member of the Black Panther Party, request Dr. King helps his leader, Huey P. Newton. Newton was wrongfully charged with murder of an Oakland city policeman during the fight for freedom.

Letter from Florida Writer to President Lyndon Johnson on True Equality

This letter from a Florida resident to President Johnson expresses the writer's views on the nation's racial challenges.

Letter from Frances Witherspoon to MLK

Frances Witherspoon offers his or her thanks and praise to Dr. King's new book and efforts in promoting racial unity.

Letter from Genevieve Young to Joan Daves

Genevieve Young expresses her opinion about the outline for Dr. King's upcoming book "Where Do We Go From Here?" She offers some suggestions and strategies to Joan Daves to help narrow the scope of the manuscript.

Letter from Geraldine Ford to MLK

The president of the Oxford Union Society invites Dr. King to a debate that will possibly be televised by the British Broadcasting Corporation. The debate will discuss topics associated with the international race issue, injustice, discrimination and more. The president addresses the concerns surrounding the Black Power Movement in the United States and in Britain.

Letter from Harry Fleischman to MLK

Harry Fleischman suggests a text that may be of interest to Dr. King, entitled "We Are Not Summer Patriots." The text highlights anti-Semitism and other efforts to attain equality.

Letter from Harry Wachtel to MLK

Mr. Wachtel, Dr. King's legal counsel, provides an update on pending matters regarding the American Foundation of Non-Violence.

Letter from Hermine I. Popper to MLK

Hermine Popper writes Dr. King regarding his manuscript on "Black Power" for his upcoming book.

Letter from Ida Passano to MLK

Mrs. Ida Kemp Passano sends encouraging words to Dr. King along with her contribution to his efforts.

Letter from J. Carter Fahy to Mr. Roy Wilkins about NAACP Name Change

In this letter to the president of the NAACP, Fahy suggests changing the name of the NAACP to NAABA, replacing "colored people" with "Black Americans."

Letter from Jeanne Whitaker to MLK

Jeanne Whitaker does not oppose the slogan "Black Power", however she identifies the distinction between power and violence. Mrs. Whitaker elaborates on the influence of non-violence that was rooted from Mahatma Gandhi's methodology and practice.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Joan Daves, Literary Agent to Dr. King, addresses the correspondence, to Dr. King. The letter includes photostats of reviews for Dr. King's last book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" The Chicago Tribune, New York Times Daily and Washington Star are just a couple of the newspapers that published reviews for the book.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK Regarding Publication Deadlines

In this letter, Joan Daves provides feedback on Dr.King's chapter on "Black Power,"and she informs Dr. King that she is waiting for chapters on "White Backlash" and "What It Means to be a Negro in America," for his book "Where do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?"

Letter from John Shirley to MLK

John Shirley, of the Oxford University Cherwell Newspaper, poses a list of questions to Dr. King concerning Civil Rights, the Vietnam War, and the emergence of Black Power groups. Shirley assures the Reverend of his gratitude for any feedback he may provide, and informs him of the circulation of the literature at being well over 10,000 within the University.

Letter from Kenneth Barney to MLK

Dr. Kenneth R. Barney sends this letter of support to Dr. King. Barney expresses his appreciation for King's interpretation of "black power" and admires his wisdom on the country's current state of affairs. He urges Dr. King to keep a "broad perspective" on the problems of American society and civilization. Barney believes that domestic and foreign policies can no longer be considered separately.

Letter from Kenneth Bells to Floyd McKissick

Kenneth Bells requests to be removed from the Congress of Racial Equality's list of potential contributors due to CORE's support of the Black Power Movement.

Letter from L. Alexander Harper and Charles E. Cobb to Edith M. Lerrigo

Edith Lerrigo writes with concern regarding the support of the "Crisis and Commitment" call by several civil rights leaders. Lerrigo endorses Dr. King's decision to refuse his signatory on the document supporting the call, stating that this act "should have been sufficient to give pause to groups like the YWCA before jumping on the moderate bandwagon."

Letter from Marlyn Roach to MLK

Marlyn Roach requests an interview in hopes of a job with SCLC, as she is disillusioned with the antipoverty programs on which she has been working. She cites the cause of the "total failure" of the program to be the difference between the Negroes' and the state and federal government's objectives.

Letter from Martha Kennedy to MLK

Martha Kennedy thanks Dr. King for sending her a copy of "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" Kennedy feels that Dr. King's leadership is well emphasized in the context of the book. Particularly, she finds the chapter on Black Power to be "valuable." Mrs. Kennedy hopes for much success to Dr. King and his great work.

Letter from Martha Roberts to MLK

Martha Roberts, of Scranton, Pennsylvania, chastises Dr. King for leading marches and speaking against the war in Vietnam. She expresses to Dr. King that his focus should be on teaching "your people" to learn trades, enhance education and accept gradual change.

Letter from Martin Paryer to MLK

Martin Paryer wrote Dr. King this letter to respond to his July form letter, stating that he finds Black Power and the violence associated with it to be detrimental to the nonviolent Civil Rights campaign. He further states that poverty is not only a Negro problem, but also a problem of all races.

Letter from Mary Bull to MLK

Mary Bull writes Dr. King expressing her sentiments towards the concept of racial separatism, and how it causes detriment to the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Mary E. Bull to MLK

Mary Bull asks Dr. King to reply to an earlier letter, of which she encloses a copy. Mrs. Bull asserts that the Civil Rights Movement made excellent progress up to 1966, but afterwards seemed divided. She wants to know the reasons for this division and asks Dr. King to bring back the supporters who have strayed.

Letter from Matthew T. Doherty to MLK

Matthew Doherty responds to an "eloquent and moving" appeal from Dr. King in the July 26th issue of The New York Times. Doherty discusses the recent surge in "black power" and its role in the ongoing struggle for equal rights. The writer also mentions his "small" contribution to aid Dr. King's efforts to "make this a better world for all of us."

Letter from MLK to Harry Belafonte

Dr. King appeals to Harry Belafonte for assistance with the Freedom Festival at the Astrodome in Houston, Texas. The Freedom Festival will benefit the SCLC at a time when it is experiencing financial hardship.

Letter from MLK to Hermine Popper

This letter from Dr. King to editor Hermine Popper references a book that Dr. King is working on. Enclosed is the chapter about "The Dilemma of White America."

Letter from MLK to Naomi Thomas

Dr. King explains to Naomi Thomas his reasons for supporting athletes who plan to boycott the Olympics.

Letter from Mrs. Donald H. Hage to MLK

Mrs. Hage praises Dr. King's work, particularly his use of peaceful means to accomplish his goals. She also requests information about how best to help at the local level in Colorado.

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