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March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, Washington, D.C., 1963

Associated Archive Content : 15 results

Civil Rights Photographic Series

These fifteen photographs chronicle several historical moments in the Civil Rights Movement.

Final Plans for the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom

This final organizing manual for the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom details all logistics of the march, including the purpose of the march and accommodations for arriving in Washington, D.C.

Letter from Congressman Charles Diggs to MLK

Michigan Congressman Charles Diggs returns the proposed plans for the August 28th, 1963 "March on Washington" to Dr. King.

Letter from Lucille Banta to MLK

In addition to a financial contribution, Lucille Banta sends Dr. King a proposal for the civil rights and peace movements to oppose the Vietnam War. She suggests that they work together to "plan and organize a nationwide United Peace and Freedom Parade to Washington."

Letter from Mary Grooms to Coretta Scott King

Mrs. Mary H. Grooms writes Mrs. Coretta Scott King expressing her support for Dr. King and the upcoming March on Washington. She also requests that Dr. King reach out to leaders in the North who have sought to emulate his methods.

Letter from MLK to Congressman Charles C. Diggs, Jr.

Dr. King responds to the concerns of Congressman Charles Diggs regarding the March on Washington. He encloses a privately distributed memorandum about the march that Dr. King believes will answer the questions Congressman Diggs has about the march. Dr. King also briefly explains the purpose and some logistics of the march.

Letter from MLK to Harry Belafonte

Dr. King writes Harry Belafonte to discuss the date, time, and occasion for the March on Washington. Dr. King also expresses his desire for Belafonte to be present.

Letter from MLK to Hazel Gregory

Dr. King responds to Hazel Gregory's previous correspondence about transportation to the March on Washington. He informs Mrs. Gregory that he is attending a meeting regarding the logistics of the march the next day and will communicate further about a bus from Montgomery to attend the event.

Letter from Nathan Watts to MLK

Mr. Watts asks Dr. King to call off the March on Washington because of the political backlash he foresees. He predicts the march will harm the civil rights bill that is being discussed in Congress., which would later be passed as the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter from Norma Lineberger to MLK

Mrs. Lineberger encloses a financial contribution for Dr. King to use for his personal well-being. She states that the gift is in memory of the late President Kennedy with hopes that his death will result in a unified stride "toward the good life."

Letter from the Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament to MLK

Canon L. John Collins, a founder of the Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament, invites Dr. King to speak at a rally in Trafalgar Square in London, England. The proposed rally will be based on the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, and Collins would like to provide a direct link between the rally and the Washington March through the participation of both Bayard Rustin and Dr. King.

March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom Pamphlet

This pamphlet promotes the historic March on Washington of August 28, 1963. The pamphlet calls upon Congress to pass civil rights legislation and end the "twin evils of discrimination and economic deprivation" that plague the nation.

Memorandum Regarding The March On Washington For Jobs and Freedom

In this memorandum, Bayard Rustin provides various civil rights leaders with the agenda for their upcoming leadership meeting regarding the 1963 March on Washington For Jobs and Freedom.

Statement by MLK Regarding His Five-Day Jail Sentence in Birmingham

Dr. King releases a statement regarding his return to Birmingham, Alabama to serve a five-day jail sentence. He states that he is happy to serve the sentence, but sad that the Supreme Court did not "uphold the rights of individual citizens." He also questions why the United States' resources are being used to fund the Vietnam War rather than to help the poor.

The A. Philip Randolph Institute

The A. Philip Randolph Institute was organized to mobilize labor, religious and other groups in support of the civil rights movement. Dr. King was a member of the Advisory Board.