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Clergy and Laymen Concerned About Vietnam (U.S.)

Clergy and Laymen Concerned About Vietnam (CALCAV) was officially founded on October 28, 1965 at the Church Center for the United Nations by Rev. Richard Neuhaus (Lutheran pastor), Rabbi Abraham Joshua Heschel (Jewish scholar and professor) and Fr. Daniel Berrigan SJ (prominent Catholic voice against the war). Martin Luther King Jr. became national co-chair, strengthening the breadth and reach of this new national organization. Neither pacifist nor radical, CALCAV was seen as a moderate movement, drawing upon the biblical roots of peacemaking as well as the strong tradition of democratic dissent. It was a highly influential religious voice for ending the war. After the war ended, it changed its name to Clergy and Laity Concerned (CALC) and worked on a number of national and international peace and justice issues.

Associated Archive Content : 23 results

An Invitation to the Honoring of Rabbi Israel Dresner and Reverend Richard Wilson

This document serves as an invitation to a event honoring Rabbi Dresner and Rev. Wilson for their outstanding spiritual leadership.

Beyond Vietnam

In Dr. Kings Beyond Vietnam address, he discusses seven major reasons for bringing Vietnam into "a field of moral vision," five things that the government should do to remove itself from conflict with Vietnam, the National Liberation Front of South Vietnam, and Premier Diem. Dr. King also encourages those in the churches and the synagogues to speak out against the war in Vietnam.

Enclosure to MLK - A Call for a National Fast by CALCAV

This is an enclosure that accompanied a letter dated March 22, 1968 from John C. Bennett to Dr. King. Dr. King spoke often of the need of fasting to repent for the sin of Vietnam, and was closely associated with the Clergy and Laymen Concerned about Vietnam (CALCAV). Between the writing of this letter and the event itself, Dr. King would be assassinated.

Letter from Ada M. Field to MLK

Ada M. Field is a ninety-year-old woman who sent Dr. King her contribution for the year. Ms. Field praised Dr. King, and the SCLC, for continuing to fight for freedom and for bringing a positive light to the process.

Letter from Aguedo Mojica Marrero to MLK

Tthe Vice President of the Puerto Rican House of Representatives requests copies of the speech given by Dr. King to the Clergy and Laymen Concerned About Vietnam.

Letter from Ann & John Flynn

In this letter, Ann Flynn requests a copy of the text of Dr. King's speech made at Riverside Church.

Letter from Charles Sellers to MLK

Charles Sellers, a Professor of History at the University of California at Berkeley, writes this letter to Dr. King promoting the Washington Convocation On The National Crisis. He encloses the proposal that he and Cecil Thomas discussed with Mrs. King over the phone. The proposal details the organized effort to marshal public sentiment against current US policy in Vietnam. Five hundred prominent Americans will be invited to the convocation, to be held in Washington, DC.

Letter from Clergy and Laymen Concerned About Vietnam

The Clergy and Laymen Concerned About Vietnam requests financial support for their mission of ending the war in Vietnam.

Letter From E. Spencer Parsons to MLK

E. Spencer Parsons, Dean of the Rockefeller Memorial Chapel at the University of Chicago, invites Dr. King to preach at a university religious service. He also commends him for the leadership he has provided Clergy and Laymen Concerned about Vietnam.

Letter from Henry S. Huntington Expressing Concerned About Vietnam

Huntington expresses deep concern regarding the Vietnam War. Huntington believes that humor and ridicule is a weapon against the war that is being used too little. He urges Dr. King and his supporters to each send a message to the president, and also write a letter to the local paper asking peace-lovers to state a message ridiculing President Johnson. In conclusion, Huntington hopes to gain other peace organizations to join in the Ridicule For Johnson Movement.

Letter from James Gustafson to MLK

James Gustafson, President of 'O KAIROS, writes to Dr. King welcoming him to the University of Minnesota's St. Paul campus. 'O KAIROS is the campus Lutheran community of worship.

Letter from Jeffery Goldberg to MLK

In this letter, Jeffery Goldberg comments on the Vietnam War and requests a copy of Dr. King's speech to Church Laymen.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK encluding copy of British magazine SLANT

Joan Daves informs Dr. King that she has enclosed a copy of the British magazine SLANT that has a shortened version of his Riverside Church address inside.

Letter From MLK to Judge B.

Dr. King writes to Judge B, inviting him to the Board Meeting in Washington D.C. The meeting is to discuss the War in Vietnam and Poor People's Campaign.

Letter from Rabbi Gerald A. Goldman to MLK

Rabbi Gerald A. Goldman invites Dr. King to be a guest at the West Side Peace Committee Conference.

Letter to MLK from Robert McAfee Brown to MLK

Mr. McAfee requests that Dr. King issues a statement, and host a service in his Church, supporting Bill Coffin.

MLK Speaks on Vietnam War

This 32-page booklet was published by Clergy and Laymen Concerned About Vietnam shortly after Dr. King’s April 4, 1967 Riverside Church address on the Vietnam War. It features a foreword by Dr. Reinhold Niebuhr, Dr. King’s speech, and remarks by Henry Steele Commager, Dr. John C. Bennett, and Rabbi Abraham Heschel. In addition, it includes a New York Times interview with Dr. King, King’s response to NAACP criticism on his opposition to the war, and letters to the editor of the New York Times.

Negotiation Now!

Negotiation Now is a national citizens' campaign that supports new initiatives to end the Vietnam War. The campaign aligns with the Secretary General of the United Nations, U Thant, who discusses the necessary "cessation" of bombing in North Vietnam to bring about a peaceful political compromise. This flier shares the campaign's views and offers a section for donation information.

Postcard from Ann Flynn to SCLC

Ann Flynn writes the SCLC requesting the full text of a speech made by Dr. King at an event sponsored by Clergy and Laymen Concerned about Vietnam.

Raphael Gould Thanks MLK For Support

Gould thanks Dr. King for his letter of support to the Clergymen's Emergency Committee in Vietnam. Gould further approves of King's dialogue printed in Playboy Magazine and encourages him to go on late night TV interview shows to reach a larger population of Americans.

The Commercial Appeal: But No Services

This photo and accompanying caption relate the story of Dr. King and an associate clerical organization conducting a silent vigil at Arlington National Cemetery after being blocked judicially from holding a memorial service in that venue.

The Committee of Clergy and Laymen Speak on Vietnam

As a public service, the Committee of Clergy and Laymen Concerned about Vietnam have reprinted several statements and addresses of its members. The selected addresses of Dr. King were chosen because of their poignant exposition of the then current issues surrounding the Vietnam War. In the compilation's forward, Dr. Reinhold Niebuhr takes the opportunity to address two of the misconceptions that surrounded the included works of Dr. King.

Why I Am Opposed to the War in Vietnam

"Why I Am Opposed to the War in Vietnam" is a sermon Dr. King delivered at Ebenezer Baptist Church on April 30, 1967 in Atlanta. In this draft of the sermon, Dr. King references a previous speech, "Beyond Vietnam," that he delivered to the group "Clergy and Laymen Concerned about Vietnam" at Riverside Baptist Church in New York City.