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Chicago Urban League

The National Urban League (NUL) began in 1910 in New York City to address the discrimination that African Americans faced in the urban industrialized North. The Chicago Urban League (CUL) was founded in 1917 and was one of the NUL’s most important affiliates. When Dr. King and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) turned to Chicago, they relied on the cooperation and support of the Chicago Urban League. CUL, in partnership with the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) and SCLC, worked to secure and improve voting rights, access to education, housing, employment and fair labor conditions for millions living in Chicago. King attended CUL events, was in correspondence with CUL leadership and spoke at CUL gatherings.

Associated Archive Content : 14 results

Chicago Urban League Golden Fellowship Dinner and Dance

The Chicago Urban League coaxes members and invitees to their Golden Fellowship Dinner and Dance with a night of privilege and a chance to win a 1967 Pontiac.

CIC Press Release: Hilliard to Head Catholic Testimonial for MLK

The Catholic Interracial Council releases a statement announcing Raymond M. Hilliard as the Chairman of the 1964 John F. Kennedy Award Dinner. During the event, Dr. King will be honored for his leadership and dedication to the civil rights struggle. Hilliard, whom President Johnson named to the National Citizens Committee for Community Relations to advise on the implementation of civil rights legislation, called Dr. King's work "inspired and truly Christian" and said that the CIC was honored to celebrate him.

Dairy Agrees to Double Number of Negro Workers

Operation Breadbasket shares an article on the organization's letterhead, which appeared in the Chicago Sun-times. The article highlights the end of a boycott after Mellody Dairy announces a decision to more than double its Negro employees.

Freedom Festival Speech on Chicago Campaign

At the Freedom Festival a speech was made in regards to the Chicago Campaign. The campaign focuses on the urban renewal of the area. Specifically, it discusses the unemployment rate and housing conditions of African-Americans.

How Urban League Helps City on Day-to-Day Basis

In this article, the council, activities, and contributions of the Urban League are discussed. Edwin C. Berry, the league's executive secretary, believes that contributions have decreased due to the league's refusal to take a stand against civil rights demonstrations. Mr. Berry is hopeful that contributors will return their support to make Chicago a "hallmark of democracy."

John A. McDermott to MLK

Mr. MacDermott informs Dr. King of the John F. Kennedy Award Dinner and requests that he wire his "greetings" to those who will be honoring him.

Letter from Edwin Berry to Jane Lee J. Eddy

Edwin Berry, Executive Director of the Chicago Urban League, writes Jane Lee Eddy, Secretary of the Taconic Foundation, to request funding for a "get-out-the-vote campaign" in Chicago.

Letter from Edwin Berry to MLK

Edwin C. Berry thanks Dr. King for his recent gift and membership to the Chicago Urban League. Berry goes on to give an update of the group's activities.

Letter from Mary Tumbull to Dr. and Mrs. King

Mrs. Turnbull expresses her gratitude to Dr. and Mrs. King for their hard work in human rights.

Letter from Nickolas W. Dick to MLK

Nickolas W. Dick writes Dr. King on behalf of Dr. Frank H. Epp extending an invitation to the Reverend to hold a series of meetings in Winnipeg. Dick closes by requesting confirmation of the extent of his stay.

Report to Agenda Committee

Junius Griffin sends Bill Berry a report and tentative program regarding summer events in Chicago during the 1966 Civil Rights Campaign.

Telegram From Edwin Berry to MLK

Edwin Berry congratulates Dr. King on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.

The Dilemma of Negro Americans

In this draft of a chapter for his book Where Do We Go from Here: Chaos or Community?, Dr. King offers an in-depth description of the plight of African Americans over the past few hundred years and how it will never be fully understood by their white counterparts. He recounts the issues associated with American slavery – the dehumanization of slaves and the destruction of the family unit. He ties what happened in the past to what is occurring in the present, explaining that because of these layers of oppression African Americans have to play catch up to be seen as equals in America.

Urban League Feeling a Financial Squeeze

This article focuses on the Chicago Urban League's struggle to gain financial support from contributors. According to the organization's director Edwin C. Berry, former contributors failed to accept the fact that the goals and scope of the league would preclude the organization from becoming a "protest group."