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School Integration

Associated Archive Content : 258 results

Background Information on March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom

This passage provides a reason as to why the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom had to occur. The Brown vs. Board Supreme Court decision, the Prayer Pilgrimage, and other peaceful demonstrations all resulted in the march.

Birmingham Desegregation Settlement Agreement

Dr. King reviews the settlement made between the City of Birmingham and civil rights protesters. This agreement includes the integration of lunch counters, sitting rooms, restrooms, and water fountains within ninety days.

Board of National Missions Writes the Editors of the Washington Post

George E. Todd, G. H. Jack Woodard, and Joseph W. Merchant send a letter to the Editors of the Washington Post regarding the Mississippi Action for Progress. They claim the organization is a tool for the destruction of the Child Development Group of Mississippi. Additional allegations are made that MAP was an instrument of the governor and legislature of Mississippi to stall school integration.

Bold Design for a New South

Dr. King notes that civil rights has been replaced as the "Number One" domestic issue, dwarfed by the Cuban missile crisis, trade legislation and tax reform. He attributes this to public acceptance of tokenism as well as an overly cautious administration. While acknowledging that the administration has made greater efforts on civil rights than previous ones, Dr. King says the progress is constricted and confined.

Book Outline: Education and the Urban Poor

This book outline lists the chapters and contributing authors of the publication "Education and the Urban Poor." The authors represented include educational professionals from all over the country including Robert L. Green, Associate Professor at Michigan State University and Education Director for the SCLC. Dr. King is listed as the author of Chapter Two entitled "Education and the Negro Revolution."

Catholics Involved in Integration

Members of Catholics Involved in Integration write a letter to solicit membership to their organization. The cost to join the group is one dollar per month. The funds raised are donated to Dr. King in support of his efforts to gain peace, freedom, and equality.

Chicago Freedom Rally

This document reflects an informational flyer regarding the Chicago Freedom Rally which promotes integration.

Confidential Memorandum

This handwritten document outlines plans for the SCLC's Direct Action program. The program will target Birmingham, Alabama, Montgomery, Alabama and Danville, Virginia.

Congress of Racial Equality Proposal: Recommended Program for School Desegregation

The Congress of Racial Equality recommends a program to end school segregation that includes forming race-neutral curricula and allowing open enrollment in schools.

Coretta Scott King - Soprano

This 1959 program features Mrs. King in concert. One section of the performance is entitled "Portrait of the Non-Violent Integration Movement in Montgomery."

Coronet Magazine: After Desegregation-What

In this draft of an article for Coronet Magazine, Dr. King outlines the challenges that Negro college students will face after desegregation and the impact of the student movement as a whole. He argues that desegregation is not the same as integration, but that the former must happen in order for the latter to exist. Dr. King also explains that Negro students are gaining a much richer education by participating in sit-ins and other civil rights demonstrations, which will prepare them for society once desegregation is a reality.

Darien Integration

This article is a summary of the integration of the Negro population into high-income residential suburbs. The Superintendent of schools and the Darien Board of Education has created a program to exchange schoolteachers and encourage students to attend schools with integrated classes.

Darien Seeking Negro Teachers

This article discusses the teacher exchange program between New York City Public Schools and Darien, Connecticut. The program calls for African American teachers to teach students in the predominately white town. The superintendent states the purpose of the project is to show the students that African Americans, if given the same opportunity, are just as intelligent as their white counterparts.

David Williams asks MLK to Visit Community Center

David A. Williams writes to Dr.King asking him to visit the local community center while on his trip to speak at the college in Manhattan, Kansas. He explains some of the trouble the local community is facing, such as a proposed highway that would disrupt his neighborhood and community center, as well as housing discrimination.

Democratic National Convention Platform Committee Statement

In this statement delivered August 22, 1964, Dr. King outlines three urgent priorities for the Committee and the party as a whole: enforcement of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, furthering voting rights and the war on poverty. He asks that the platform include a recommendation that a panel of voting rights marshals be established and that the Convention support a Bill of Rights for the Disadvantaged.

Dr. King recounts civil rights struggle in Albany, Georgia

Dr. King recounts the civil rights struggle in Albany, Georgia. Every element of the community participated in mass demonstrations protesting discrimination in public spaces, school segregation, denial of voting rights, and the deprivation of freedom of speech and assembly. King explains the purpose and use of nonviolent methodologies as "resistance to injustice and non-cooperation with evil." He describes several examples of direct action and the building of political strength.

Dr. MLK and the American Dream

The article talks about Dr.King addressing the issue of racial imbalance in Boston public schools. Dr. King expresses his opinion that "racial segregation is politically unsound and relegates persons to the status of things, stigmatizing persons of color as untouchables in a caste system.

Draft Letter from MLK to Gregory Coffin

Dr. King expresses his appreciation to Mr. Coffin for sending newspaper clippings and a proposal regarding schools in Darien, Connecticut. He also states that he is hopeful that Mr. Coffin's program will act as a contributing factor in the effort to end segregation.

Draft of MLK's An Open Letter to Negro Youth

In an open letter to Negro Youths, Dr. King urges them to stay committed to the nonviolent principles of social change in their plight to gain broad access to education and employment.

Draft of Showdown for Nonviolence

This is a draft, with Dr. King's revisions, of the article "Showdown for Nonviolence" for Look Magazine. The article was published posthumously on April 16, 1968.

Draft of Statement to TIME Magazine from MLK

In this statement, Dr. King is pleased to know that the President is calling for new civil rights legislation. Unfortunately, the President did not express anything new nor directly address the issue. Dr. King emphasizes the urgent need for the President to demand vigorous civil rights legislation in order to expedite school integration and the right to vote.

Draft: The Time for Freedom Has Come

In this draft of Dr. King's article, "The Time for Freedom Has Come," he discusses the role of African American students in the Civil Rights Movement. He praises the commitment and determination of students and credits them with the desegregation of lunch counters. He also identifies with the students' frustration with the slowness of forward progress in the struggle for equality. The article was published in New York Times Magazine on September 10, 1961.

Face the Nation Interview

This is a transcript of an August 1965 interview of Dr. King on the CBS television news program Face the Nation. King is asked to comment on numerous issues facing American society including the conflict in Vietnam, civil rights, housing and birth control.

Facing the Challenge of a New Life

Dr. King uses Greek Philosophy, the Christian conception of agape love, and the need for nonviolent resistance as a guideline of "Facing the Challenge of a New Life" in America. Throughout the sermon, he encourages African Americans to remain committed to the nonviolent principles of the Montgomery Bus Boycott and the precepts of Christian living to facilitate the birth of a new way of life in an America dealing with violent conflicts over social conditions.

Fifty-five Facts about Morehouse

This pamphlet discusses fifty-five important facts about Morehouse College and its distinguished alumni.

Fisk News: The Montgomery Story

This publication of Fisk News features one of Dr. King's speeches on page five. The speech is entitled "The Montgomery Story," and was delivered at the 13th Annual Institute of Race Relations at Fisk University. Dr. King commences to share of Rosa Parks' refusal to move from her bus seat and help begin the historic Montgomery Bus Boycott. Blacks boycotted public transportation for 7 months in Montgomery, Alabama and achieved success in changing the city's discriminatory practices.

Foreword to Neil Sullivan's Book by MLK

Dr. King submits a rough draft of his foreword for a text written by Berkeley County Public Schools Superintendent Neil Sullivan.

Full Opportunity Act Summary

This summary outlines and provides the provisions of each section of the proposed Full Opportunity Act.

Georgia Council on Human Relations

The author informs the readers about the poverty problem in Georgia. They claim that the AFDC or "Aid to Families of Dependent Children" needs improvement. The author also mentions issues such as unemployment, education and voter registration.

Guidelines for a Constructive Church

In this sermon delivered at Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta, Dr. King spells out guidelines for the church: healing the broken-hearted, preaching deliverance to the captive (freeing people from everything that enslaves), and preaching the acceptable year of the Lord. The acceptable year of the Lord, he says, is every year the time is right to do right, stop lying and cheating, do justice, learn to live as brothers and beat swords into plowshares.

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