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African Americans - Religion.

Associated Archive Content : 34 results

A Resolution Directed to the African Methodist Episopal Church

This resolution endorses the appointment of Donald Jacobs as Bishop of the African Methodist Episcopal Church.

An Evening of Negro Culture and History

This booklet, entitled "Black is Beautiful and It's So Beautiful To Be Black," contains information from an SCLC event held August 16, 1967 that sought to explore Negro culture and history.

Bibliography Compiled by MLK

This handwritten bibliography documents texts that discuss theology.

Black Power

This is a chapter sermon for Dr. King's book "Where Do We Go From Here?" The civil rights leader traces the early development of Black Power and its eventual surge onto the national political scene. Though understood as a direct opposition to the nonviolent movement that organizations like SCLC, CORE, and SNCC originally supported, King describes Black Power as a "disappointment wrapped in despair."

Black Power and the American Christ

The Christian Century published this article by historian and civil rights activist Vincent Harding in its June 4, 1967 issue. In the essay, Harding, friend, associate, and speech writer for Dr. King, claims that Eurocentric Christianity antagonized the Black Power Movement.

By-Laws of the SCLC

This document outlines the by-laws of the SCLC, which includes the organization's purpose, duties and responsibilities of members, and procedures governing officers and committees. The purpose of the SCLC is to "organize and maintain Christian guidance" to aid in improving cultural conditions.

Clarence Jordan's Open letter to to the First Baptist Church of Atlanta

Clarence Jordan writes to the First Baptist Church of Atlanta to voice his opinion on the Ashton Jones affair. Ashton Jones, a white Methodist minister, was jailed for "disturbing divine worship" when he and two African American associates attempted to take part in a segregated church service. Jordan attempts to parallel this event to biblical accounts where Judeo-Christian leaders disrupted services involved with idol worship. Jordan further asserts that while the state of Georgia may permit the worshipping of a "segregated god," "God himself does not."

Dexter Echo: April 6, 1960

This edition of The Dexter Echo addressed to Dr.

Dexter Echo: July 6, 1960

This July 1960 newsletter of The Dexter Echo is sent to Dr. and Mrs. King. The newsletter covers recent events of the Dexter Avenue Baptist Church, the church Dr. King pastored during his time in Birmingham, Alabama. The main article "Christian Control and Action Amid Social Tensions" questions how to manage life's tensions and discusses the nature of fear. The newsletter also includes an article on Men's Day and shares the news on various congregation members.

Five Denominations of Protestants Said To Ignore Negroes

This article discusses a claim brought against "five influential Protestant denominations" by members of the Rockefeller Fund for Theological Education. Specifically referenced is Rev. Dr. C. Shelby Rooks, Executive secretary of the fund, who is reported as saying that the American Baptist Convention, the Episcopal, the Methodist, the United Presbyterian Churches, and the United Church of Christ discriminated against African Americans "from the centers of denominational power and decision making." Dr.

Letter from Charles Merrill to MLK

Charles Merrill, who was Chairman of the Board of Trustees of Morehouse College, informs Dr. King that he is sending a donation of $5000 to be used for "either peace or civil rights work" and he concludes by offering his view on Dr. King's philosophy.

Letter from Macedonia Church to MLK

Members of Macedonia Church seek advice and help from Dr. King in regards to continuing Sunday worship service.

Letter from MLK to E. Weidner

Dr. King informs Mrs. E. Weidner that Negroes have enjoyed positions of respect and prestige in non-Negro nations. He cites several examples in history to this statement.

Letter from MLK to Rabbi Julius Rosenthal

Dr. King writes to his supporter Rabbi Julius Rosenthal responding to concerns raised about Dr. King's connections with Congressman Adam Clayton Powell (a prominent pastor and politician). Congressman Powell was a controversial figure during that time and while Dr. King did not share all of his views, he gave him credit for advocating Civil Rights for African Americans.

Letter from Reginald Holmes to MLK

Reginald Holmes, a fifth grader at Our Lady of Perpetual Help School, asks Dr. King for information about his church and his role as spiritual leader.

Letter from Rembert Stokes to MLK

The President of Wilberforce University anticipates Dr. King's speech before a delegation of the African Methodist Episcopal Church. Rembert Stokes also notes that Dr. King would receive a donation following his address, to help support the civil rights movement. Stokes wishes that Dr. King's message would center around the AME church leadership's involvement in the freedom struggle.

Letter from Rev. Charles William Butler to MLK

Dr. King writes to Rev. Charles William Butler of the Metropolitan Baptist Church to acknowledge receipt of his kind letter concerning moral support. Dr. King references his shock of reading about a vicious attack made by Dr. Jackson accusing him of conspiracy. Stating that numerous friends have suggested that the Reverend sue Jackson, Dr. King expresses his decision to be adherent to his basic philosophy of non-violence.

Letter from Reverend A. S. Markham to MLK

Rev. Markham requests a response from Dr. King to an earlier letter. In the previous letter, Markham informed Dr. King that the Brotherhood Society of Beth Shalom Synagogue would like to present an award to Dr. King.

Letter from T. K. Mahadevan to MLK

T. K. Mahadevan writes Dr. King asking him to contribute to an article paying homage to the late Reverend A. J. Muste.

Love and Forgiveness

This is a speech entitled "Love and Forgiveness" that Dr. King delivered at the American Baptist Convention meeting in Atlantic City, New Jersey. Jesus Christ and segregation serve as the major topics for this speech. Dr. King makes the compelling statements that "Jesus decided to meet hate with love," and that "segregation is still the Negro's burden and America's shame."

MLK Address to the National Press Club

Dr. King gives an address to the National Press Club in Washington, D.C. He discusses his recent conviction for marching in Albany, the economic status of the Negro, racial issues, communism, the church, and the practice of nonviolent resistance. He states that the church is the most segregated institution in America. Dr. King also states that racial issues are a national problem and that the goal of the Negro is freedom.

Negro Church Finest Hope for Christianity

Ruth Haefner forwards a publication from The Pittsburgh Courier which states, "the newly militant Negro theologians in America, may perform the miracle of raising the dead (Western Christendom) to life." She further expresses her hopes that Dr. King may do the work of reviving the Christian spirit with a weekly letter featured in London press.

Registration for the Annual Youth Retreat

This is a document from Reverend Earl Stirewalt with information on the annual Youth Retreat of the Georgia Baptist Convention. The retreat aims to aid in the spiritual growth of young men and women.

Rev. Leon Howard Sullivan's Resume

This resume details Rev. Leon Howard Sullivan's degrees, affiliations, awards, works and accomplishments. SCLC's Operation Breadbasket was modeled after the Selective Patronage program that Rev. Sullivan developed.

Seventh Annual Gandhi Memorial Lecture

Howard University presents Dr. King as its primary speaker for their seventh annual Gandhi Memorial Lecture in 1966. Dr. King traces the slow but meaningful progress society has made from slavery to the current civil rights movement. However, he notes that the present challenges in achieving equality involve not only the silence of individuals of good will but also the conditons that keep the Negro inferior.

Statement on Selma-Montgomery March of March 21-26

This statement by Father Dom T. Orsini expounds on the details of the March 21-26, 1965 Selma-Montgomery March. Orsini expresses that he is proud of the youth and their enthusiasm in participating in the march and suggests that insisting improper relations took place would be ridiculous.

Telegram from Thomas Gedeon to MLK

Reverend Gedeon, director of the Jesuit Retreat House in Cleveland, Ohio, writes to Dr. King concerning a proposed retreat program geared towards uniting religious and Negro leaders. Due to the lack of responses on Dr. King behalf, Gedeon terminates any further plans for the aimed program until further notice.

The Montgomery Bus Boycott Story

This dramatic story gives a riveting account of the Montgomery Bus Boycott movement and its aim to end segregation of the public transit in Montgomery, Alabama after the arrest of Rosa Parks. E.D. Nixon and other ministers illustrate the philosophy of nonviolent tactics employed by the Montgomery Improvement Association and their struggle for "cosmic companionship."

The Sword That Heals

Dr. King, in this article adapted from his book "Why We Can't Wait," evaluates the intimidation the Negro faces as a result of securing freedom. He uses the campaigns in Birmingham, Albany, and Montgomery as backdrops to depict how the use of nonviolent direct action causes unrelenting sacrifice in the face of grave danger. This article was published in this quarterly summer 1964 issue of "The Critic."

The Tabernacle Baptist Church

The Tabernacle Baptist Church publishes this program for their Young Adult Sunday on March 20, 1960. Dr. King is listed to deliver the sermon at morning worship service.

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