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African Americans - Intimidation of

Associated Archive Content : 166 results

Facing the Challenge of a New Life

Dr. King uses Greek Philosophy, the Christian conception of agape love, and the need for nonviolent resistance as a guideline of "Facing the Challenge of a New Life" in America. Throughout the sermon, he encourages African Americans to remain committed to the nonviolent principles of the Montgomery Bus Boycott and the precepts of Christian living to facilitate the birth of a new way of life in an America dealing with violent conflicts over social conditions.

Funny Story for MLK

The writer (signature illegible) gives his moral support for Dr. King during his incarceration in Albany, Georgia. He relates an anecdote of his own experiences that ends with a heartfelt, and humorous, punchline.

Georgia Council on Human Relations

The author informs the readers about the poverty problem in Georgia. They claim that the AFDC or "Aid to Families of Dependent Children" needs improvement. The author also mentions issues such as unemployment, education and voter registration.

Georgia Council on Human Relations: Program Highlights

This newsletter informs readers of the upheaval in the state of Georgia by reporting a variety of incidents around the state. The program focuses on events around Atlanta, including an attack in the Dixie Hills community in which two Molotov cocktails were thrown and, during the ensuing chaos, one man one was killed by a shotgun blast and three others wounded.

I HAVE A DREAM

Text of Dr. King's "I Have a Dream" speech delivered August 28, 1963 at the Lincoln Memorial, Washington, D. C.

Institute on Nonviolent Resistance to Segregation

The SCLC publishes this manifesto declaring that all eyes are focused on the South as it confronts the controversial issues of freedom and equality for Negroes. In the quest for equality, the southern Negros' plan of defense is Christian love and non-violent resistance. The document not only reveals tragic conditions in the South, but also affirms five principles by which equality can be achieved for Negro citizens.

Integration Details in Wilcox County

On September 23, 1966, Wilcox County School in Alabama was integrated. However, the amount of "physical acts" and "extreme brutality" directed towards the Negro students was so great that the parents of the students prohibited their children from attending just a few months later. In this report, Robert L. Green, the Education Consultant to the SCLC, outlines the details of this event to Mr. John Doar of the U.S. Justice Department. He tells Mr.

Join the Ranks! Support A Worker

An SCLC field worker writes to gain support for the SCLC so that the organization can fulfill its mission to help blacks "achieve full citizenship rights, stimulate nonviolent mass action, and secure the right to vote."

King and SCLC Meet in Montgomery

This press release announces a mass meeting held in Montgomery, Alabama by the Executive Board of SCLC. The meeting was held in response to a major libel suit against four prominent SCLC officials. Dr. King gives an address to boost morale during the course of this suit. In Dr. King's view, "The South has lost its solidity. Whites fight against whites over desegregation. Be it known, evil cannot permanently organize itself." The libel suit came to be known as the New York Times Company vs. Sullivan (1960).

Legal Petition Made by Karl Von Key Against Selective Service System

Karl Von Key petitions the United States District Court of California about his draft into the armed forces. He contends that, as a person of color, he is a colonial subject, not a citizen of the United States. As a colonial subject, he should not be forced to serve in the military. He also writes that he is a conscientious objector and that he believes he was targeted by the local induction station because of his social and political views.

Let's Be Human

Long time civil rights agitator Harry Fleischman wrote this syndicated column for the American Jewish Committee's National Labor Service. Articles within the column took a humorous and often irreverent view of social and civil rights issues around the globe. Fleischman was also the national secretary of the Socialist Party USA from 1942-50.

Letter from an Asylum Inmate to MLK Seeking Assistance

Paul Douglas Ware, an untried inmate, requests Dr. King's "understanding, moral support, and possible assistance." Mr. Ware informs Dr. King of detailed information regarding his unjust treatment, his personal life, his present state of mind and most importantly his desire to have a stronger bond with "his own people."

Letter from Ann Pooney to MLK

Ann Pooney expresses her sentiments regarding Dr. King's teachings and the state of African Americans. Pooney feels that most blacks have not proven to be good Christians or citizens of the US.

Letter from Burke Marshall of the Department of Justice to MLK

In reply to Dr. King's telegram concerning the actions of a Mitchell County peace officer towards Mrs. Slater King, the wife of a civil rights activist and successful real estate broker, Assistant Attorney General Burke Marshall writes that an investigation of this matter has been ordered.

Letter from Clare Stover to the SCLC

Mrs. Stover sends the SCLC a copy of a letter she sent to the Hammermill Paper Company following its decision to locate in Alabama. She condemns the company's decision because she feels economic development should be withheld from states that do not uphold federal law. She also questions whether the State of Alabama will be able to honor its promise of tax breaks, which it used to lure Hammermill Paper Company to the state.

Letter from Clarence B. Jones to the Editor of New York Times

Clarence Jones writes the editor of the New York Times to comment on a statement made by James Reston. According to Mr. Jones the statement was factually inaccurate and partially paraphrased.

Letter from Constance Beitzell to MLK

In the aftermath of Dr. King's arrest in Birmingham, Constance Beitzell expresses her dissatisfaction with federal officials not putting an end to the intimidation against Negroes in Birmingham. Beitzell is perplexed at the fact that the United States promotes freedom but does not allow freedom for many of its citizens who happen to be Negro. According to Beitzell, "What man in a Christian nation can trample on the rights of a citizen because of his race?"

Letter from David Brandyberry to MLK

David Brandberry, a student 16 years of age, informs Dr. King that he desires to voice his opinion about the racial issues in the south. Mr. Brandberry cannot comprehend the logical reasoning of racism and the motives of the "ignorant whites." Furthermore, the student discusses the issues of immigration and the political concept of communism. Mr. Brandberry states that he "wish he had been born a Negro" to he could be of more assistance in the movement.

Letter from Finley Drewery to NAACP

Finley Drewery writes to the NAACP seeking aid for his upcoming criminal trial. He asserts that the state has no hard evidence against him and that his court appointed attorney is trying to make him pay $3,000 to mount a defense in court.

Letter from Halevy H. Simmons to MLK

New York-based architect Halevy H. Simmons offers his professional services to rebuild Negro churches in the state of Georgia.These pillars of Negro culture were targeted throughout the state in a series of racially motivated hate crimes.

Letter from Harry G. Boyte to Leon R. Martin

SCLC Director of Research and Information Harry Boyte communicates with Leon Martin to thank him for the thoughtful words made in response to Dr. King's article in "The New Leader." Boyte tells Martin that Negroes in America are at a place where they will no longer be forced to wait for equality. Boyte asserts that only the complete participation of Negroes in every part of life in America will "suffice at this juncture in history."

Letter from James M. Nielsen to MLK

James M. Nielson congratulates Dr. King on receiving Time Magazine's Man-of-the-Year Award. Mr. Nielson invites Dr. King to the Sixth Annual Trade Fair sponsored by the Anacortes Jaycees.

Letter from L. K. Jackson to MLK

Reverend L. K. Jackson commends Dr. King on his ongoing efforts in the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Lucille Banta to MLK

In addition to a financial contribution, Lucille Banta sends Dr. King a proposal for the civil rights and peace movements to oppose the Vietnam War. She suggests that they work together to "plan and organize a nationwide United Peace and Freedom Parade to Washington."

Letter from MLK and Others to President Dwight D. Eisenhower

A group of Southern religious leaders write to President Eisenhower concerning the extreme violence directed towards Negro people throughout the South. They request his immediate action to address the nation's moral and legal framework sustained by the presiding racial climate.

Letter from MLK to Adam Clayton Powell

Dr. King writes Adam Clayton Powell to seek advice on how to handle Powell's return from self-imposed exile in Bimini. Powell sought to publicize the event with a public announcement by Dr. King. However, Dr. King and Powell's lawyers suggest that they arrange a quiet, staged arrest with local officials to prevent public pressure from forcing a more lengthy arrest over the criminal contempt charges Powell faced for vacating his seat in Congress. Dr. King suggests more publicity could follow once Powell's lawyers free him on bond and begin the appeals process.

Letter from MLK to Robert Kennedy

Dr. King urges Attorney General Kennedy to act on behalf of the Negro citizens in LeFlore County who are being attacked for working in voter registration or becoming registered voters.

Letter from Peggy Seldes to MLK

Peggy Seldes thanks Dr. King for responding to her daughter's previous letter. Peggy goes on to praise Dr. King for his I Have A Dream speech given during the March On Washington of August 28, 1963.

Letter from Polly M. Williams to Whom it May Concern

Polly Williams, a former counselor of the Neighborhood Youth Corps, requests a full investigation of its director, Mr. Pace. Mrs. Williams requested a sick leave while undergoing surgery, yet later discovered that her request had counted as vacation time. She discusses numerous orders she received from Mr. Pace that negatively impacted her health and her recovery from surgery. She believes that she is a victim of racial discrimination in the workplace.

Letter from Rayphil Clark to MLK

Michigan inmate Rayphil Clark urges Dr. King to assist him with receiving fair treatment during his incarceration. Clark lists multiple situations where Negro employees and inmates are intimidated by white prison officials. Most importantly, Clark feels that he is constantly being singled out and subjected to horrible treatment. According to Clark's description of prison officials, "they are more concerned with racial vengenaude then they are re-habiliation."

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