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African Americans - Social conditions.

Associated Archive Content : 211 results

Letter from Ethel T. Elsea to MLK

Ethel Elsea, Assistant Editor at the Fleming H. Revell Company, requests Dr. King's permission to use a quotation for a book by Frank S. Mead.

Letter from Eugene Jackson to MLK

Eugene Jackson expresses his amazement with Dr. King's superb performance during his interview on "Meet the Press."

Letter from Eula Shaw to MLK

Calling Dr. King "The Trouble Maker of the United States," Mrs. Shaw criticizes Dr. King's methods in the Civil Rights Movement. She argues that a "campaign of love is in order" rather than demonstrations.

Letter from Fitzhugh Mullan to MLK

Fitzhugh Mullan, the Chairman of the Student Health Organization of Chicago, asks Dr. King to be an advisor to the organization. Nationwide, the student health movement has worked in the ghettos of Los Angeles, with California migrant farmworkers, and in three Southern states.

Letter from Fra Morton Sims to MLK

Dr. King is encouraged to read a US News & World Report article entitled, "One Negro Woman's Advice to Her People." The article approaches the issues of the African American community from an understanding perspective.

Letter from George T. Altman to MLK

Attorney George Altman informs Dr. King of a US District Court order preventing him from taking Dr. King's deposition concerning whether or not people of color should have the same military service requirements as whites. Altman presents the case that people of color were colonial subjects rather than citizens, but the District Court ruled against his position. Altman plans to fight this ruling in an appeal the following month.

Letter from George W. Chivers to MLK

George W. Chivers writes to Dr. King objecting to the Alabama law that disallows women from sitting as jurors. He compares this denial of women's civil rights to the injustices suffered by Negroes in Alabama.

Letter from Harold W. Buchholz to MLK

Harold W. Buchholz, a financial patron, provides Dr. King with tips to appeal to more Americans regarding his programs to provide equality for Negroes.

Letter from Herbert Jones to MLK

Mr. Jones informs Dr. King of a grassroots civil rights organization (STOP) that seeks to implement a "stay at home" protest nationwide. Mr. Jones seeks Dr. King's assistance to make that happen.

Letter from I.M. Sternberg to MLK

I.M. Sternberg, Western Electric Public Affairs Representative, poses four questions regarding the social conditions of Blacks. Sternberg requests feedback from Dr. King in order to raise awareness and to promote social justice activism among company employees.

Letter from Jean and Hildegard Goss-Mayr to MLK

Jean and Hildegard Goss-Mayr, of the International Fellowship of Reconciliation, invite Dr. King to speak at a meeting in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. They also congratulate him on winning the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from Jeriann Kelsey to MLK

Jeriann Kelsey writes Dr. King to contrast and compare her experiences raising her son in Mississippi to the Civil Rights Movement and the war in Vietnam. She includes a photo of her son to show that a son "I have seen and touched and loved" is more important to her than "a war I've merely heard about."

Letter from Jimmie Barnett to MLK

A Negro owner of "so-called slum property" takes offense at Dr. King's stance on the subject. He argues that the owners of the properties are primarily Negroes who are not at fault. Dr. King undertook an extensive "End to Slums" campaign in Chicago in 1966 under the sponsorship of the SCLC and various community organizations.

Letter from John B. Morris to Alfred Hardman

The Executive Director of the Episcopal Society for Cultural and Racial Unity writes the Lovett School Board of Trustees regarding the decision not to accept Negroes. Reverend John Morris informs Reverend Alfred Hardman that the church does not agree with the decision and will protest it. Dr. King's son, Martin Luther King III was one of the students not admitted into the school.

Letter from John G. Allerdice Jr. to MLK

John Allerdice writes Dr. King on behalf of the Human Relations Council of Shortridge High School regarding a planned conference that will discuss human relations for the high school students of Indianapolis. They would like for Dr. King to "tape a short message" for them to use.

Letter from John H. Herriford to MLK

John Herriford, a student at the University of Minnesota, offers Dr. King advice on how to improve sit-in demonstrations.

Letter from John. O Behrens to MLK

Mr. Behrens welcomes Dr. King to the city of Chicago. In an effort to show his gratitude, Behrens offers Dr. King a subcription to "Community", a magazine published by Friendship House. He also requests an opportunity to interview with Dr. King.

Letter from Joseph T. Beaver to MLK

Joseph Beaver, Jr. sends his sympathy to Dr. King following the attempt on Dr. King's life. He had originally included a biography of Wendell Phillips Dabney.

Letter from Kathleen Reid to MLK

Kathleen Reed, the editor of Alert Catholic, writes to Dr. King enclosing the most recent copy of the publication. The Newsletter of the National Council of Catholic Men features a quote by Dr. King to President Johnson which stated "the conditions which you so bravely set out to remedy when you entered office" have not changed.

Letter from L. K. Jackson to MLK

Reverend L. K. Jackson commends Dr. King on his ongoing efforts in the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Larry Schneider to MLK

Larry Schneider informs Dr. King that he is available for assistance with "planning and implementing" Dr. King's efforts. He also offers his thoughts on a wide variety of issues affecting the American Negro.

Letter from Leon Despres to MLK

Leon M. Despres, Alderman of the Fifth Ward of Chicago, welcomes Dr. King to the city. Despres expresses his appreciation for King's visit and encourages as much help as possible to help rid Chicago of their current system of segregation.

Letter from Lula Belle Williams to Dr. and Mrs. King

Lula Williams writes Dr. and Mrs. King seeking help to pay her rent before she is evicted.

Letter from Martin Kessler to MLK

Martin Kessler sends Dr. King an article by Daniel P. Moynihan entitled "Is There Really an Urban Crisis?" Moynihan addresses issues of the economic and social conditions in America in the interview with Challenge Magazine.

Letter from Mary A. Edmonds to MLK

Mary A. Edmonds expresses her disapproval of Dr. King and the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Mary B. Courtney to MLK

Mary B. Courtney requests Dr. King's help to sell her property. She explains to him that the house has been on the market for three years in St. Petersburg, Florida, and while "several colored people" have contacted the real estate agency with interest, they are dissuaded by the lack of African Americans in the neighborhood. The author suggests that Dr. King contact some of his associates in St. Petersburg to assist in the matter.

Letter from MLK to Adam Clayton Powell

Dr. King writes Adam Clayton Powell to seek advice on how to handle Powell's return from self-imposed exile in Bimini. Powell sought to publicize the event with a public announcement by Dr. King. However, Dr. King and Powell's lawyers suggest that they arrange a quiet, staged arrest with local officials to prevent public pressure from forcing a more lengthy arrest over the criminal contempt charges Powell faced for vacating his seat in Congress. Dr. King suggests more publicity could follow once Powell's lawyers free him on bond and begin the appeals process.

Letter from MLK to Beulah H. Brunson

Dr. King offers his gratitude to Beulah H. Brunson of the Georgiana Thomas Grand Chapter O. E. S. for her contribution to the SCLC. Dr. King comments on the progress made over the past decade in improving conditions for Negroes in the South.

Letter from MLK to Gertrude Corbett

Dr. King thanks Miss Corbett for her message regarding the SCLC Chicago Campaign. He agrees with Miss Corbett's view that the current Negro dilemma is rooted in multiple causes. He also discusses standards of living, economic conditions and society as a whole.

Letter from MLK to Henry Luce of Time Magazine

Dr. King thanks Henry Luce of Time magazine for naming him "Man of the Year." However, Dr. King believes that this honor is shared among the millions of individuals who committed themselves to the struggle for civil rights. Dr. King also acknowledges Luce for publishing the accomplishments of Negro professionals.

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