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African Americans - Economic conditions.

Associated Archive Content : 298 results

Letter from MLK to Congressman Charles C. Diggs, Jr.

Dr. King responds to the concerns of Congressman Charles Diggs regarding the March on Washington. He encloses a privately distributed memorandum about the march that Dr. King believes will answer the questions Congressman Diggs has about the march. Dr. King also briefly explains the purpose and some logistics of the march.

Letter from MLK to Daniel Blicksilver

Dr. King thanks Blicksilver for his contribution to the SCLC. He acknowledges the impact of such support in improving race relations throughout the nation.

Letter from MLK to Earl T. Jefferson

Dr. King expresses his gratitude for Jefferson's contribution to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference and briefly describes the organization's principles and efforts.

Letter from MLK to Esther Thompson

Dr. King informs Mrs. Thompson that the SCLC does not have the resources to help aid her husband's sight. Dr. King recommends that she contact churches in her area for help.

Letter from MLK to G. Lawrence Jones

Dr. King writes G. Lawrence Jones distressed that Jones doesn't have the funds to pursue higher education. King states, "Our troubled world needs very much for young men with the courage and foresight you display to receive every chance to develop your full potential."

Letter from MLK to Gertrude Corbett

Dr. King thanks Miss Corbett for her message regarding the SCLC Chicago Campaign. He agrees with Miss Corbett's view that the current Negro dilemma is rooted in multiple causes. He also discusses standards of living, economic conditions and society as a whole.

Letter from MLK to Herbert Schaltegger

Dr. King acknowledges Mr. Schaltegger's letter in which he asked for Dr. King's reaction to his theory of equality. Dr. King responds by discussing the injustices committed against Negroes in America and how they have been denied Constitutional rights.

Letter from MLK to Jimmy Edward

Dr. King acknowledges receipt of Mr. Jimmy Edwards' letter with the kind words concerning his book, "Strength To Love."

Letter from MLK to Mr. G. H. Bishop

Dr. King expresses his gratitude for Mr. G. H. Bishop's financial contribution to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Letter from MLK to Nathaniel Barber

Dr. King thanks Nathaniel Barber for his contribution to the SCLC and gives a brief overview of the work done by the organization.

Letter from MLK to Professor Zeegus

Dr. King commends Professor Zeegus for his organization, Heart of Africa, and its mission to "mobilize public support for the struggle of the American Negro in efforts to help achieve freedom and equality."

Letter from MLK to Sharon Brealer

Dr. King expresses his gratitude to Sharon Brealer for her contribution to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Letter from Mr. Herbert. H. Fisher to MLK

Mr. Fisher, President of the Chatham Avalon Park Community Council, provides an organized detailed account of community concerns. More specifically, he addresses various social and political issues regarding schools, housing, insufficient leadership, and government services.

Letter from Mrs. Carrie Fillmore to MLK

Mrs. Fillmore requests help from Dr. King as she informs him that she has six children and cannot afford to get them into schools. She also lets Dr. King know that she has gone to the NAACP without results.

Letter from Mrs. M. Happe to MLK

Mrs. M. Happe, a poor white woman, expresses gratitude to Dr. King for his campaign to clean up the slums in Chicago. She asserts that poverty is an issue, but education is the main problem and individuals cannot display appropriate behavior that they have never experienced.

Letter from Mrs. W. Brown to MLK

Mrs. W. Brown proclaims that Dr. King should preach a colorblind love that is absent of hate and resentment toward white people. She further asserts that the contributions Dr. King received could have been used to improve substandard housing. Mrs. Brown continues to discuss her perception of the inadequacies within the black community in comparison to white people.

Letter from Mrs. Willie Mae White to SCLC

Mrs. Willie Mae White requests help from SCLC. She explains that she has fifteen children and would like to provide Christmas dinner and gifts, but does not have the financial means to do so. As a poor family in Scottsdale, Georgia, her family struggles, living without many basic necessities. Mrs. White also appeals to the members of SCLC, imploring them to send any available household ware, such as curtains, sheets, clothes, and kitchen utensils.

Letter from Paul Noe to MLK

Mr. Noe shares his ideas and comments with Dr. King regarding the Civil Rights Movement. Mr. Noe describes the Civil Rights Movement as the "exclusive domain of the black man" and discusses how he has felt very left out of the movement due to his race. He hopes that the Civil Rights Movement will become the "domain of all Americans" and will change its appeal from racism to decency.

Letter from R. Terry Taft to MLK

R. Terry Taft expresses his disappointment in reading Dr. King's feelings in Newsweek regarding the failure of the Office of Urban affairs to become a federal cabinet position.

Letter from Randolph T. Blackwell to MLK

Randolph T. Blackwell notifies Dr. King about the Office of Economic Opportunity grant to Crawfordville Enterprises in Taliaferro County, Georgia. The program will provide economic expansion for rural areas and education development.

Letter from Richard Boone Enclosing CCAP Statement

This letter from the Executive Director of Citizens' Crusade Against Poverty encloses a statement regarding the 1966 Amendments made to the Economic Opportunity Act.

Letter from Richard C. Gilman to MLK

Richard C. Gilman, President of Occidental College, invites Dr. King to speak to the students at their opening convocation.

Letter from Robert Stark to President Johnson

Mr. Stark sends the President his views on Liberty and Justice for All, calling programs designed to benefit Negroes a "farce," denouncing Negro lack of responsibility and claiming that it is civil rights not the Vietnam War that is expensive. He is upset that there is so much media focus on blacks and believes it is time to insist upon white rights.

Letter from Taconic Foundation to MLK

Stephen Currier, President of the Taconic Foundation, invites Dr. King to attend a meeting about the development of a new program. Currier lists other individuals who have been invited to serve as consultants and who will provide "an evaluation of Negro gains up to the present."

Letter from Theodore Brown to MLK and Others

This is a memorandum from Theodore E. Brown concerning his trip to Nigeria. Brown attaches a newspaper article referencing the turmoil in Nigeria.

Letter from Troy J. Horton to MLK

Troy J. Horton, a teacher at Wilson High School, inquires if Dr. King is interested in speaking to the student body of the school on topics such as racism, prejudice and segregation.

Letter from Vivian C. Kelley to MLK and President Kennedy

Vivian C. Kelley offers her support to Dr. King in his continued efforts in the Civil Rights Movement. Mrs. Kelley shares with Dr. King a letter in which she asks President John F. Kennedy to address issues of discrimination in the United States. In response to Mrs. Kelly, Lee C. White, Assistant Special Counsel to the President, expresses thanks on the behalf of President John F. Kennedy and assures Mrs. Kelley the President and the Administration are dedicated to ending discrimination and securing the Constitutional Rights of all Americans.

Letter from W. J. Murphy to Deton Brooks

Congressman W. J. Murphy writes this letter to Dr. Deton Brooks, Executive Director of the Commission on Urban Opportunity. After listening to a radio show, of which Dr. Brooks and Dr. King posed commentary, Murphy was prompted with a response towards solving America's racial issues. Murphy states he initially opposed the executively ordered Fair Employment Practices Commission for the reason that brotherly love could not be legislated. FEPC requires that companies in governmental contract could not discriminate on the basis of race or religion.

Letter from W. L. Overholser to MLK

W.L. Overholser of Winnimac, Indiana proposes that the SCLC change its tactics and support the Peace Welfare Party that he is forming. He maintains that, because too few people control too much of the country's wealth, a lack of jobs creates too much feuding and racial prejudice. Overholser argues that neither party can serve both the richest 10%, who control all the wealth, and the other 90% of the country, because the disparity makes most politicians two-faced. Overholser feels that whites and blacks should focus on forming a new party, and asks Dr.

Letter from W. Warner Beckett to MLK

Mr. Beckett, a publisher at New Lady Magazine, writes to Dr. King requesting that he lead an "armada" of people with the intent of focusing on businesses and industries. Mr. Beckett believes that Negroes and concerned whites should fight against large businesses by "diverting money from key industries."

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