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White House Administrative Office (U.S.)

Associated Archive Content : 114 results

Telegram from MLK to President Johnson about Howard Address

Dr. King writes to President Lyndon B. Johnson expressing appreciation and admiration for his speech at the Howard University Commencement.

Telegram from MLK to President Johnson about VISTA Director

Dr. King writes President Johnson recommending that Dr. Maurice Dawkins become the new director of VISTA.

Telegram from MLK to President Johnson on Home Rule

Dr. King urges President Johnson to support the administration bill on Home Rule for Washington, D.C. rather than pursue a compromise.

Telegram from MLK to President Johnson on State of the Union Address

Dr. King praises President Johnson for his State of the Union address. King expresses appreciation for Johnson's continued commitment to the Great Society, his call for legislation to protect those pursuing their constitutional rights and his pledge to work diligently to end the Vietnam War.

Telegram from MLK to President Kennedy

In order to protect citizens involved in voter registration from attacks and harassment by police, Dr. King requests that President Kennedy intervene the situation in Greenwood, Mississippi.

Telegram from MLK to Sargent Shriver

Dr. King commends Mr. Shriver and the Office of Economic Opportunity for funding the Southwest Alabama Farmers Cooperative Association. Dr. King asserts that this decision is a positive step in the War on Poverty that will directly affect countless numbers of impoverished people.

Telegram from President Johnson to Bernard Lee

Dr. King's special assistant, Bernard Lee, was the recipient of this telegram requesting his presence at a White House conference called by President Johnson. The theme of the conference was "To Fulfill These Rights."

Telegram from President Johnson to MLK

President Lyndon B. Johnson writes to Dr. King sympathizing with his concern over the incidents that occurred in Philadelphia, Mississippi. King was continuing the March Against Fear of James Meredith, who was shot by a sniper on June 6. A rally in Philadelphia commemorating the murder two years earlier of three civil rights activists was angrily attacked by a white mob. Homes of blacks were later sprayed with gunfire.

Telegram from President Kennedy to MLK

President John F. Kennedy applauds the work of Dr. King and the SCLC on the occasion of the organization’s Sixth Annual Convention.

Telegram from President Kennedy to MLK

President Kennedy compliments Dr. King and his organization for their persistent push for equal rights in America.

Telegram from Ralph Abernathy to John F. Kennedy

Rev. Ralph Abernathy accepts President John F. Kennedy’s invitation to meet and discuss the civil rights problem.

Telegram from Rev. Ralph Abernathy to President Johnson

Rev. Abernathy urges President Johnson to meet with a group of poverty-stricken people from Syracuse, New York at Johnson's Texas White House.

Telegram from Wyatt T. Walker to President Kennedy

Wyatt T. Walker confirms his attendance at a meeting with President Kennedy at the White House.

Telegram to MLK from Truman B. Douglass

Truman B. Douglass, the chairman of the National Citizens Committee for the Child Development Group of Mississippi (CDGM), informs Dr. King that he has appealed to President Johnson for a meeting regarding the funding of CDGM.

Telegrams from MLK to John and Robert Kennedy

In these draft telegrams, Dr. King requests a meeting with President John Kennedy and Attorney General Robert Kennedy to address the imminent crisis in the South.

Telegrams from MLK to the Kennedys

Dr. King informs President John F. Kennedy and Attorney General Robert Kennedy of the bombings and police behavior in Birmingham, Alabama. Dr. King suggests that if desegregation does not occur the city will experience a "racial holocaust."

The Domestic Impact of the War in America

In his address to the National Labor Leadership Assembly for Peace, Dr. King parallels the war in Vietnam to the injustice and violence inflicted on urban dwelling American Negroes "goaded and infuriated by discrimination and neglect." King implores Congress and the Johnson Administration to reassess the nation's domestic priorities and institute anti-poverty programs, so that the Great Society does not deteriorate into a "troubled and confused society."

To Earn a Living: The Right of Every American

Frederick B. Abramson, the assistant to Clifford Alexander, Jr. sends this copy of President Johnson's "To Earn a Living: the Right of Every American." Alexander, the chairman of the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, in cooperation with the White House, had this message circulated to the Congress of the United States. President Johnson's message urges Congress to assist with creating jobs and providing access to job training to all Americans regardless of race or socioeconomic status.

To Fulfill These Rights

The White House Conference on Civil Rights printed this program in preparation for their June 1966 conference. The theme of this agenda is entitled To Fulfill These Rights.

True Democracy

Reverend O. J. P. Wetklo explains his ideas of true democracy, which he gives a Christian foundation and compares to the natural world. He calls true democracy "a perfect brotherhood of man," and he argues that each individual member of society must take responsibility for the whole.

War in Vietnam Must Be Ended

Marriner S. Eccles, a banker and former governor of the Federal Reserve System, urges an end to the Vietnam War, saying the U.S. is violating international law and has taken over the war to fight communism in Vietnam. He believes the billions spent on war would be more effective in preventing the spread of communism if spent on eliminating poverty and illiteracy in the developing countries.

White Backlash Growing

The intensity in the Civil Rights Movement increased as blacks remained segregated and the Black Power movement gained popularity. White backlash increased during these times, but Dr. King noted that demonstrations "did not breed hate, but only revealed hatred that already existed."

White House Invitation to Signing of Voting Rights Act

This telegram from The White House invites Dr. King to the U.S. Capitol for the signing of the Voting Rights Act of 1965.

Women's International League for Peace and Freedom Newsletter

This issue of the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom newsletter, Four Lights, was sent to Coretta Scott King. It features an article about the current state of their demonstrations against Vietnam, including a quote by Dr. Benjamin Spock calling on President Johnson to end the attack on the Vietnam War.

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