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United States. Congress

Associated Archive Content : 457 results

Letter from A.C. Spectorsky to MLK

Editorial Director, A.C. Spectorsky, requests comments from Dr. King regarding an interview with Senator Charles Percy from the April issue of PLAYBOY Magazine. The Illinois Republican
discusses a range of subjects including American military presence in Vietnam, President Lyndon B. Johnson's leadership style, and Negro-white relations.

Letter from Abraham Ribicoff to MLK

Abraham Ribicoff thanks Dr. King for his kind letter and expresses his contentment with the passing of the Civil Rights Bill. Ribicoff hopes for the progression of the nation in providing equal opportunities for all.

Letter from Abraham Ribicoff to MLK

Senator Abraham Ribicoff, Chairman of the Subcommittee on Executive Reorganization, asks Dr. King to appear at a congressional hearing about the problems facing urban cities. He explains that the subcommittee does not understand the full psychological, social and economic conditions that challenge people living in urban areas.

Letter from Alfred Gunn to MLK

Alfred L. Gunn requests Dr King's support of Gunn's "new Democratic way of Philosophy." Mr. Dunn also encloses three manuscripts pertaining to riots, the American gun and rifle laws, and the occurrence of racial problems in America.

Letter from Alfred Martin of the Jefferson Democratic Association to MLK

Alfred Martin, representing the Jefferson Democratic Association, offers his support to Dr. King and the struggle for equality in the south. He forwards two documents to Dr. King pertaining to his potential run for Congress and his ideas to assist Negroes in being able to vote. Martin also encloses a donation and apologizes for his inability to send more.

Letter from American Friends Service Committee to MLK

R. Ogden Hannaford and Kale A. Williams, representatives of the American Friends Service Committee, enclose a pre-publication edition of a book aimed at peacefully resolving the issues in Vietnam.

Letter from Anna Mull Jones to MLK

Anna M. Jones informs Dr. King that she will pray for him while he is in jail, but she also requests that he read the history of the United States and reread the Constitution. She asserts that the Republican Party was created for the express purpose of halting the spread of slavery.

Letter from Anton Marguleas to MLK

Anton Marguleas, of the Paramount Export Company, writes Dr. King to express his views on democracy and human rights.

Letter from Arnold Aronson to Cooperating Organizations

Arnold Aronson writes cooperating organizations to ensure that following the March on Washington, the government delivers on the stipulations of the Civil Rights Bill.

Letter from Arthur Newberg to Senator Roman Hruska

Reverend Arthur H. Newberg writes this letter to Nebraska Senator Roman L. Hruska (R-NE) regarding an investigation of United States investments and corporation operations in South Africa. Due to international and national consequences, Newberg solicits help with pressuring the decision to subpoena key witnesses that are U.S. corporate and government officials. The author is concerned that the investigation may confirm "the existence of a pattern of American economic support for South African apartheid."

Letter from Audrey Mizer to MLK

Audrey Mizer encourages Dr. King to continue his good works because "the world cannot be robbed of any good." Mizer then discusses her opposing views to a statement in a Christian Monitor Column regarding Red China's admission to the United Nations.

Letter from Benjamin F. Smith to the Editor of Detroit Free Press

In a letter to the editor of the Detroit Free Press, Benjamin Smith criticizes US involvement in Vietnam. He advocates ending the war as 80% of South Vietnamese people want peace, while 67% of Americans "favor a rough war."

Letter from Byron F. Mische to the Members of Congress Regarding Vietnam

In this letter to the members of Congress, Byron E. Mische took the initiative to combine letters sent to government officials, editors of publications and congressmen regarding Vietnam. This letter was copied to Dr. King.

Letter from Byron L. Johnson to MLK

Byron L. Johnson questions the accountability and lack of trust within the House of Representatives. Furthermore, Mr. Johnson suggest the House of Representatives create a new code of ethics, observe due process of law, and ensure the financial validity of all candidates.

Letter from C. M. Johnson to MLK

Mrs. Johnson requests Dr. King's help in reinstating Congressman Adam Clayton Powell.

Letter from C. Summer Stone Jr. to MLK

Chuck Stone, assistant to New York Congressman Adam Clayton Powell, follows up with Dr. King about a telephone conversation between Powell and Dr. King. The discussion centered on Dr. King preaching at Abyssinian for the anniversary service. Stone reiterates Powell's hopes that Dr. King will be able to participate.

Letter from Carey McWilliams to Dora McDonald

Carey McWilliams writes Dora McDonald acknowledging confirmation of Dr. King's commitment to speak for "The Nation's" conference in Los Angeles.

Letter from Carey McWilliams to MLK

Carey McWilliams, Editor of "The Nation," reminds Dr. King that it is nearly time to publish his annual article. McWilliams also requests that the timing of the article correspond with the beginning of the new session of Congress.

Letter from Charles A. Halleck to MLK

Charles A. Halleck expresses gratitude for Dr. King's letter outlining his reasons for opposing the seating of the five congressmen for the state of Mississippi.

Letter from Charles Crawford to MLK

Charles S. Crawford expresses his dissent with Dr. King on a variety of subjects, one specifically his stance towards President Johnson and the concept of civil disobedience.

Letter from Charles McC. Mathias, Jr. to MLK

Congressman Mathias of Maryland thanks Dr. King for his recent letter urging him to vote against the seating of the Mississippi Delegation. Although Mathias' vote against the seating was defeated, he states that the mere challenge to it "has drawn once again the attention of the American public to this unfortunate situation."

Letter from Charles McC. Mathias, Jr. to MLK

Maryland Congressman Charles M. Mathias thanks Dr. King for his letter regarding the Representative's recent trip to Selma, Alabama. As a result of his visit, Congressman Mathias informs Dr. King that he prepared and introduced civil rights legislation to the latest House of Representatives session.

Letter from Charles S. Joelson to MLK

Congressman Joelson of New Jersey responds to Dr. King's recent letter urging House Representatives to vote against the seating of the Mississippi Delegation. He informs Dr. King that he shares his view and was one of the 148 members who voted against it.

Letter from Charles Sellers to MLK

Charles Sellers, a Professor of History at the University of California at Berkeley, writes this letter to Dr. King promoting the Washington Convocation On The National Crisis. He encloses the proposal that he and Cecil Thomas discussed with Mrs. King over the phone. The proposal details the organized effort to marshal public sentiment against current US policy in Vietnam. Five hundred prominent Americans will be invited to the convocation, to be held in Washington, DC.

Letter from Charles W. Martine to Ohio Senator

This letter from Dental Technician Charles W. Martin speaks out against the racism in America. He denounces George Wallace as a racist candidate for the 1968 Presidential Election, admonishes members of Congress for not speaking out against Mr. Wallace, and states he will leave the service if Mr. Wallace is elected to the Presidency.

Letter from Clair Callan to MLK

Representative Callan of Nebraska writes Dr. King to thank him for his recent telegram regarding the Mississippi Congressional Delegation. After giving serious consideration to Dr. King's recommendation to vote against seating the Mississippi Congressman, Callan states that he came to the conclusion that "a refusal to seat the Delegation in question would not further the cause of the Negro in that state," and consequently voted for the seating.

Letter from Clair M. Cook to MLK

Mr. Cook, legislative assisant to Senator Hartke of Indiana, thanks Dr. King for his recent letter lauding Senator Hartke for supporting the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Cook also recalls his and Dr. King's experience at Boston University.

Letter from Clara Sturges Johnson to MLK

Ms. Johnson informs Dr. King of her efforts promoting the passing of the "Kennedy Civil Rights Memorial Act." The United States Congress would go on to pass this act in 1964.

Letter from Congressman Adam Clatyon Powell to MLK

Harlem Representative Adam Clayton Powell informs Dr. King that all of the "War on Poverty" hearings will be cancelled until furtherl notice.

Letter from Congressman Augustus F. Hawkins to MLK

Augustus Hawkins, the first black Congressman from California, asks Dr. King to offer suggestions and comments about how to further the aims of the Economic Opportunity Act of 1964. Hawkins reports that the act has garnered resistance from local political leadership because many fear it will undermine their power.

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