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United States. Congress

Associated Archive Content : 457 results

Congressional Record: The President's Housing Bill, or, How To Succeed in Politics Without Really Trying

Senator Charles Percy forwarded this article, published in the Congressional Record, to Dr. King. The article discusses President Johnson's attempted housing referendum, known as the Fair Housing Bill, in March of 1968.

Convocation on Equal Justice Under the Law

This is a transcript of remarks made by Dr. King at the Convocation on Equal Justice Under Law, sponsored by the NAACP Legal Defense Fund on May 28, 1964.

Daniel B. Brewster Address before the Senate

The Honorable Daniel B. Brewster, U. S. Senator from Maryland, addresses the President of the United States and the Second Session of the 88th Congress regarding the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Dignity Is the Best Way

The Atlanta Constitution writes about Dr. King serving a five day sentence for contempt of court in Birmingham.

Do the Following to Keep National Attention Focused on Selma

Dr. King composes a list of activities that will keep national attention focused on Selma. Written on Waldorf Astoria Hotel stationary, the list includes measures such as contacting top level government officials like President Johnson, organizing a march, and enlisting the help of celebrities. Dr. King concludes the list by emphasizing "We must insist that voting is the issue and here Selma has dirty hands."

Dr. King recounts civil rights struggle in Albany, Georgia

Dr. King recounts the civil rights struggle in Albany, Georgia. Every element of the community participated in mass demonstrations protesting discrimination in public spaces, school segregation, denial of voting rights, and the deprivation of freedom of speech and assembly. King explains the purpose and use of nonviolent methodologies as "resistance to injustice and non-cooperation with evil." He describes several examples of direct action and the building of political strength.

Draft of Address at the Fourth Constitutional Convention of the AFL-CIO

In this address to the AFL-CIO, Dr. King compares the labor and civil rights movements. He argues that those who are anti-labor are also likely anti-civil rights. Thus, the Negro understands the labor movement and shares the same enemies. Dr. King also predicts that the coming years will be trying ones for laborers due to the automation of work processes, stating that "automation will grind jobs into dust." Dr. King urges the labor movement to strengthen itself by embracing the Negro people.

Draft of MLK's An Open Letter to Negro Youth

In an open letter to Negro Youths, Dr. King urges them to stay committed to the nonviolent principles of social change in their plight to gain broad access to education and employment.

Draft of Showdown for Nonviolence

This is a draft, with Dr. King's revisions, of the article "Showdown for Nonviolence" for Look Magazine. The article was published posthumously on April 16, 1968.

Economic and Social Bill of Rights

The SCLC calls for an economic and social bill of rights to demand the inalienable rights to life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness for African Americans. It would include the right of every employable citizen to a decent job, the right of every citizen to a minimum income, the right to a decent house in a neighborhood of choice, the right to an adequate education, the right to health care, and the right to full participation in decision-making.

Eisenhower - Views on the Racial Question

Dr. King notes General Dwight D. Eisenhower's justification of racial segregation during Eisenhower's 1948 testimony before a Senate subcommittee.

Employment Testing Disenfranchises Minority Groups

The U.S. Commission on Civil Rights releases a report revealing the frequency and impact of employers' discriminatory hiring procedures. Staff Director of the Commission William L. Taylor emphasizes the improper use of employment testing greatly undermines "the goal of providing equal employment opportunities for minority group members."

Entering 1964: Toward Full Emancipation

In this draft of an article for the NY Amsterdam News, Dr. King asserts that the thrust of the Negro will increase toward full emancipation as they began the year 1964. Dr. King highlights the March on Washington where both Negroes and whites collectively demonstrated the need for self-respect and human dignity in the United States. He also elaborates on the technique of "selective patronage" to broaden the economic and employment opportunities for the African American community.

Eulogy for Robert W. Spike

Dr. King highlights the life and work of American clergyman, theologian, and civil rights leader, Robert W. Spike. Spike was a leader known for mobilizing church participation for the Civil Rights Movement. Less than one year after accepting a professorship at the University of Chicago, he was murdered.

Financial Report of the SCLC

This is the SCLC financial report for the week of March 4 through March 8, 1968. Income, disbursements, and bank balances from several banks are included in this document. Expenses from organizational projects, such as Voter Registration, the Washington Project and Operation Breadbasket, are also documented. A list of priorities and outstanding debts conclude the report.

Ghettos and Segregation in City Urbanizing

Dr. King writes this speech explaining the current economic and social conditions of city ghettos. As cities urbanize, ghettos expand and segregation increases. "The ghetto has become the hallmark of our major cities just as truly as the cities themselves are becoming the hallmark of the nation." Though the last thirty years has seen advancements in legislation, what remains unrecognized is the gap between legislation intent and the actualization of community programs that have tangible affects on the neighborhoods.

How Dodd Differs From Powell/Dwellings Toured

The newspaper article entitled, "How Dodd Differs From Powell," examines how differently Senator J. Dodd and Congressman Adam C. Powell were treated after a major controversy. This controversy resulted in the removal of Congressman Powell from office.

Hruska Says Capital...

Nebraska Senator Roman Hruska criticizes the Dr. King-led demonstrations and asserts that the government does not really know what the demonstrator's goals are.

If I were a Negro

Rabbi I. Usher Kirshblum writes Dr. King to share an article he wrote in the "Jewish Center of Kew Garden Hills Bulletin." The article references the expelling of Congressman Adam Clayton Powell and criticizes the African American response towards his defense. The author states, "If I were a Negro I would not waste my time in defending Powell's wrong acts but would rather speak of the many good acts he performed." Rabbi Kirshblum goes on to praise the views of men like Dr. King and Rev. Roy Wilkins, while rejecting those of Stokely Carmichael.

Importance of Negro History and Independence

Dr. King speaks to society's misunderstanding of Negro thought and the resulting tensions in race relations. He attributes this misunderstanding to the lack of Negro history authentically represented in books. Contrived myths created by "omission and commission in books" have reinforced prejudice and faulty sense of white supremacy. He observes that illusions cloud reality and render hostility. Society's unresolved problems are aggravated by racial misconceptions.

Institute of Non-Violence and Social Change: Reformation for Freedom

This 1957 program with the theme "Dignity with Humility, Love with Courage and Justice without Violence" details an event of the Institute of Non-Violence and Social Change, in which Dr. King is featured as a guest speaker. Though his affiliation is listed as President of Montgomery's Improvement Association, Dr. King appeared as leader of the nascent Southern Christian Leadership Conference, formed January 10, 1957.

Interview about Refusal to Seat Julian Bond

This is transcript of a question and answer period following a news conference at which Dr. King made a statement regarding the Georgia State Legislature's refusal to seat Julian Bond after Bond announced his support of a Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) news release opposing the Vietnam War. King led a protest rally to the state house.

Introduction of Edward M. Kennedy

Dr. King introduces Robert Kennedy at a gathering in Jackson, Mississippi, calling him a "capable statesman" with a "great social vision."

Introduction of Senator Edward M. Kennedy

Dr. King introduces Senator Edward M. Kennedy at a SCLC banquet and highlights his accomplishments.

JFK's Executive Order In Housing

This document is a draft of an article, written by Dr. King, to be placed in the Amsterdam Newspaper. Dr. King breaks down the housing order signed into law by President Kennedy. He makes clear that housing discrimination is a large hurdle to ending segregation.

Joint Statement on Violence in the Cities

Dr. King, A. Philip Randolph, Whitney M. Young Jr., and Roy Wilkins issue a joint statement urging Negro Americans in cities such as Newark and Detroit to end the public disorder and rioting. The civil rights leaders emphasize the potential damage the urban riots pose to "the Negro population, to the civil rights cause, and to the entire nation."

King Calls for Anti-War Referendum

Dr. King announces a nationwide campaign to give Americans an opportunity to vote on the Vietnam War. He explains that the local initiative is a unique and dramatic way for the people to deliver their mandate against the war.

King's Way Hurts Rights Movement

Mr. White, author of this article, argues that the political fallout from Dr. King's stance on America's involvement in Vietnam hinders the goals of the Civil Rights Movement.

Leaders' Itinerary for August 28 March

This document contains a detailed leaders' itinerary for the March on Washington for Freedom and Jobs. Throughout the day leaders will meet with government officials, including, the Speaker of the United States House of Representatives John McCormack and President John F. Kennedy.

Letter from "A Southerner" to MLK

This letter, signed by, "A Southerner", suggests that Dr. King persuade Black people to return to Africa.

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