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Associated Archive Content : 72 results

Letter From Otis Roberts to MLK

Otis Roberts, a Grants Officer for the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, asks that Dr. King send him a signed copy of the enclosed Grant Award for SCLSC's Basic Adult Education Project for Urban Negroes.

Letter from Richard W. Boone

The Child Development Group of Mississippi is being terminated by the Office of Economic Opportunity. This is not because the program isn't valid but because it would disturb the balance of politics in Mississippi. Klein and Saks, Inc. has helped keep the program alive. The goal of the program was to provide education, medical assistance, and nourishment for preschool children and their families.

Letter from Robert F. Kennedy to MLK

Robert F. Kennedy writes to Dr. King regarding his recent trip to Mississippi. Kennedy tells of his engagement with the Department of Agriculture and the Subcommittee on Employment in efforts to help relieve the present hunger crisis. The focus is "to provide more and better food" to people with low income or no income at all. He also wants the committee and Congress to pay close attention to this subject and encourages an analysis of the food stamp system.

Letter from Robert L. Green to MLK

Michigan State University Associate Professor Robert Green sends Dr. King the final report of the Chicago Adult Education Project funded by the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare.

Letter from Robert Weaver to MLK

Secretary Weaver responds to a former letter from Dr. King requesting assistance for an economic project sponsored by Ebenezer Baptist Church. He informs Dr. King to contact Mr. John Thigpen at the Atlanta Federal Housing Administration office.

Letter from Southern Negro Leaders Conference on Transportation and Non-Violent Integration to Henry Brownell

The Southern Negro Leaders Conference on Transportation and Nonviolent Integration request a conference with U.S. Attorney General Brownell to discuss the federal government's plans.

Letter from the Legislative Director to Senator Gaylord Nelson to MLK

William J. Springs writes Dr. King to send him the enclosed document entitled, "A Brief Account of Historic Connections Between Negro Americans and African in South Africa" by Mary Benson. The material is to be used in correlation with the hearing on American policy toward South Africa that will be held by Congressman Barratt O' Harra, Chairman of the Africa subcommittee.

Letter from Thomas R. Hughes to MLK

Thomas R. Hughes, Executive Assistant to the Secretary of Agriculture, sends Dr. King Orville Freeman's Senate testimony on the Department's efforts to improve nutrition for low-income families and provide food assistance throughout the country.

Letter from US Attorney General Robert Kennedy Forwarded to MLK

John L. Murphy writes Dr. King to forward him a letter for the Reverend from US Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy that his office received in error. In the forwarded letter, Kennedy thanks Dr. King for his willingness to contribute to a series of oral interviews for the John F. Kennedy library.

Letter from W. J. Murphy to Deton Brooks

Congressman W. J. Murphy writes this letter to Dr. Deton Brooks, Executive Director of the Commission on Urban Opportunity. After listening to a radio show, of which Dr. Brooks and Dr. King posed commentary, Murphy was prompted with a response towards solving America's racial issues. Murphy states he initially opposed the executively ordered Fair Employment Practices Commission for the reason that brotherly love could not be legislated. FEPC requires that companies in governmental contract could not discriminate on the basis of race or religion.

Letter Regarding the Emergency Convocation of the Urban Coalition

A letter drafted by Andrew Heiskell and A. Philip Randolph, co-Chairmen of the Urban Coalition. includes article clippings from various newspapers discussing the dire need for public service employment, private employment, educational disparities, reconstruction and urban development, and equal housing opportunities.

Letter to MLK Requesting Aid

In this plea to Dr. King, Mrs. Venis Whitten asks for assistance with obtaining adequate medical care and welfare, which would tremendously improve the livelihood of herself and her two grandchildren.

Letter to Senator Abraham Ribicoff from Earl Whitted Jr.

In this reply to Sen. Ribicoff, Earl Whitted endorses the idea of a guaranteed fixed annual income for the poor, under certain stipulations. It is proposed that a Federal Housing Project area would also provide various economic services to the underprivileged. This program would accomplish education and self-sustainability for those that have been politically and economically disadvantaged.

Life Magazine: Why We Can't Wait

This excerpt, taken from Dr. King's book "Why We Can't Wait," appears in an issue of Life Magazine. King parallels the experience of handicapped people to the social handicap of the Negro. Comparing instances of governmental aid, he notes that there has been "countless other measures of compensatory treatment that the nation has accepted and approved as logical and moral." King continues the segment by referencing the stance of three American presidents that he has engaged conversation on the subject of civil rights.

March to Washington Strategic Planning

This document outlines key strategies concerning the upcoming March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom on August 28, 1963. The one-day civil rights demonstration intends to bring national attention to the social and economic injustices afflicting millions of American citizens.

Memo from Barbara Moffett to MLK

Barbara W. Moffett writes a memorandum to Dr. King and Harry Wachtel, commenting on a second draft statement submitted by the American Friends Service Committee to the SCLC. Ms. Moffett also sends a copy of the memo with a handwritten note to Andy Young.

MLK Speaks on the African American Family

Dr. King speaks to an assembly in Chicago, Illinois about the history and dynamics of the African American family in the United States.

MLK Speaks on Vietnam War

This 32-page booklet was published by Clergy and Laymen Concerned About Vietnam shortly after Dr. King’s April 4, 1967 Riverside Church address on the Vietnam War. It features a foreword by Dr. Reinhold Niebuhr, Dr. King’s speech, and remarks by Henry Steele Commager, Dr. John C. Bennett, and Rabbi Abraham Heschel. In addition, it includes a New York Times interview with Dr. King, King’s response to NAACP criticism on his opposition to the war, and letters to the editor of the New York Times.

MLK's Address to Syracuse University

Dr. King, in a public speech at Howard University, talks about numerous factors that affect education in America.

More State Funds Urged for Negro Banks

This article reports about Operation Breadbasket's request for more funding from the State of Illinois to further its economic development efforts in the African American community.

Peace and Freedom Party Registration Drive

This document discusses the Peace and Freedom Party Registration Drive and the California Committee for the Peace and Freedom Party. The registration drive aims to place the Peace and Freedom Party on the 1968 California ballot with the purpose of opposing the Democratic and Republican presidential candidates. Also included is a partial list of the Peace and Freedom Party's endorsers, which includes 1962 Nobel Peace Prize recipient Linus Pauling.

President's Committee on Government Contracts

In 1953 President Dwight D. Eisenhower established the President's Committee on Government Contracts. This organization was created to ensure anti-discrimination compliance with any organizations affiliated with government contracts. This report highlights "Five Years of Progress" within the organization.

Proposal to Save War-Burned and War-Injured Vietnamese Children

The Committee of Responsibility sponsors an initiative to transport children from deplorable hospitals in Vietnam to the U.S. Plans also include enlisting help from governmental agencies, as well as collecting funds and support from the American people.

Report to Agenda Committee

Junius Griffin sends Bill Berry a report and tentative program regarding summer events in Chicago during the 1966 Civil Rights Campaign.

Revised Grant Award Letter from Otis Roberts

Otis Roberts lists changes to a grant awarded by the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare.

Save the Children of Mississippi Resolutions

Barbara Greene issues a memo for the Ad Hoc Committee to Save the Children of Mississippi that includes resolutions to protest federal funding cutbacks of Head Start programs in Mississippi and interpretation of the Green Amendment regarding maximizing participation in such programs by the poor. She attaches a copy of a telegram sent to Sargent Shriver, Director of the Office of Economic Opportunity.

SCLC Annual Report by MLK, 1965

Dr King delivered this report at the SCLC's ninth annual national convention in Birmingham, Alabama. Serving essentially as a State of the Union address for the SCLC, the report touches on the major topics of the Civil Rights Movement and the recent achievements and goals of the SCLC.

SCLC Newsletter, July-August 1964

This 1964 SCLC newsletter addresses nearly all if not all topics related to the Civil Rights Movement of the era.

SCLC Newsletter: June-July 1965

The cover story for this 1965 SCLC Newsletter features Dr. King leading a March in Chicago, and also includes the usual wide gamut of Civil Rights Movement issues. Editor Ed Clayton's column discusses the "loss of fear" among Negroes, who "never again will be systematically excluded from office, or driven back from the voting booth."

SCLC President's Report - MLK

Delivered at the Tenth Annual Convention of the SCLC, Dr. King presents the annual report for the organization. King addresses several elements of the Civil Rights Movement as he discusses the successes, plans, goals, and vision of the SCLC in relation to the wider movement it represents.

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