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Peace movements

Associated Archive Content : 164 results

Letter from International Institute for Peace to MLK

O. P. Paliwal and Yves Choliere, from the World Council of Peace, invite Dr. King to speak at a session in Geneva about the well being of Vietnam.

Letter from Jacques Muhlethaler to MLK

The EIP, an association which seeks to establish the greatest number of schools in the world, asks Dr. King to become a member of their Board of Patrons.

Letter from Jacques Muhlethaler to MLK

Jacques Muhlethaler writes Dr. King requesting that he accept a committee position with EIP. The EIP is an organization seeking to contribute to world peace by instituting an interdisciplinary curriculum in classrooms domestically and abroad.

Letter from John H. Telfer to MLK

Mr. Telfer, a 6th grade teacher, offers his sincerest gratitude for Dr. King and his efforts to eradicate injustice. He includes an additional thanks to Reverend Fred Shuttlesworth, a fellow civil rights leader.

Letter from Juan Mari Bras to MLK

Juan Mari Bras, Secretary-General of the Movement for Puerto Rican Independence, writes Dr. King about Puerto Rican opposition to the Vietnam War. Bras informs Dr. King that his group will be at the April 15th Mobilization Committee Against the War in Vietnam rally outside of the United Nations. Bras hopes to communicate with Dr. King face to face and exchange ideas.

Letter from Katharine Gunning to President Johnson

Katharine Gunning of New York writes President Johnson and copies various dignitaries, including Dr. King. Gunning voices her opposition to the Vietnam War, in particular the bombing campaign, which she views as an escalation of the war.

Letter from Kenneth Lee to MLK

Kenneth Lee, President of the International Confederation of Disarmament and Peace, invites Dr. King to become a sponsor of the organization.

Letter from Leonard Chadwick to MLK

Chadwick, a student at Lincoln school of Berkeley, California, offers encouragement to Dr. King and his continuous efforts for social good.

Letter from Lillian Robertson to MLK

The Baptist Pacifist Fellowship confirms that Dr. King will speak at its upcoming annual meeting. Lillian Robertson, Secretary-Treasurer of the Fellowship, also encloses a brochure about the organization.

Letter from Lucille Banta to MLK

In addition to a financial contribution, Lucille Banta sends Dr. King a proposal for the civil rights and peace movements to oppose the Vietnam War. She suggests that they work together to "plan and organize a nationwide United Peace and Freedom Parade to Washington."

Letter from Mildred Scott Olmsted to MLK

The Women's International League for Peace and Freedom would like Dr. King to send his greetings for their 50th Anniversary celebration.

Letter from MLK to Attorney General Robert Kennedy

Dr. King writes to Attorney General Robert Kennedy requesting an investigation in Williamston, NC to relieve the Negro community from violence and "unconstitutional police action."

Letter from MLK to Don Blaine

Dr. King shows delight in Mr. Don Blaine's idea of promoting a "peace caravan" to travel around the United States. He requests that Blaine further develop the idea and contact heads of various peace organizations to assist in the endeavor. Dr. King also displays his willingness to participate in the caravan.

Letter from MLK to Former Supporters

Dr. King addresses former supporters concerning his controversial stance on Vietnam. He examines the country's colonial history and struggle for independence as contributing factors to America's current military presence in Vietnam. The civil rights leader defends his commitment to nonviolence as an "exceptional moral responsibility" that must transcend international borders.

Letter from MLK to J. Martin England

Dr. King express his appreciation for Mr. J. Martin England's support.

Letter from MLK to Jacob Nolde

Dr. King discusses with Jacob Nolde the importance of nonviolent peace movements and the malady of the Vietnam War. He stresses that these nonviolent actions should be exercised internationally and America should cease its desire to maintain wide-spread military control.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Gambbacinni

Dr. King acknowledges Mr. Gambaccini's request to the Pope for peace regarding the Vietnam War. Dr. King adds, "As the strength of our world's weapons increases and the war in Vietnam continues to escalate the crying need for world peace becomes greater and greater."

Letter from MLK to Rabbi Everett Gendler

Dr. King thanks Rabbi Gendler for his significant contribution to the SCLC. He asserts that the financial contributions will aid in the SCLC's political and social agendas in Danville, Virginia.

Letter from MLK to Raymond Beard

Dr. King thanks Raymond Beard for his statement on peace and Christianity. He believes that the Fellowship of Reconciliation can distribute Beard's message to fellow clergyman around the country. In Dr. King's view, "...we must embark upon positive programs of international aid and amity to strenghten the bonds of world community and to eliminate the conditions which historically have led nations to start wars."

Letter from MLK to SNCC's John Lewis Regarding the Nobel Peace Prize

Dr. King extends gratitude to John Lewis, Chairman of SNCC, for his encouraging letter upon the announcement of Dr. King being chosen to receive the 1964 Nobel Peace Prize. Dr. King states he does not accept this award as a tribute to himself, but as a tribute to the entire Civil Rights Movement. Lewis was regarded as a key SNCC leader and became the US Representative for Georgia's 5th congressional district in 1987.

Letter from Mr. and Mrs. Albert Weiss to MLK

A Wisconsin couple criticizes Dr. King for "outcries" against policy in Vietnam and the "so called peace movement."

Letter from Mrs. Robert Hall to MLK

Mrs. Hall suggests a letter writing campaign for young people as a more effective and less intimidating means of demonstrating than petitions and marches.

Letter from Paul Noe to MLK

Mr. Noe shares his ideas and comments with Dr. King regarding the Civil Rights Movement. Mr. Noe describes the Civil Rights Movement as the "exclusive domain of the black man" and discusses how he has felt very left out of the movement due to his race. He hopes that the Civil Rights Movement will become the "domain of all Americans" and will change its appeal from racism to decency.

Letter from Peggy Duff to MLK

Peggy Duff writes Dr. King inviting him to join the World Conference on Vietnam in Stockholm. The conference will include delegates from multiple peace organizations around the world to help protest the war in Vietnam.

Letter from Peggy Duff to MLK

Peggy Duff writes Dr. King inviting him to attend a conference in Stockholm, Sweden surrounding the issue of peace and the Vietnam War. Duff is an official with the International Confederation for Disarmament and Peace. She thanks Dr. King for meeting with her in San Francisco, California and urges him to attend the conference in Stockholm.

Letter from Peggy Duff to MLK

Peggy Duff, from the International Confederation for Disarmament and Peace, writes to Dr. King requesting his support in ending the Vietnam War.

Letter from Robert Sandberg from MLK

Robert Sandberg criticizes Dr. King for his recent statements on the Vietnam War. Mr. Sandberg states that Dr. King's position has now undermined his effectiveness as a leader in the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Rodney H. Clurman to Jayaprakash Narayan

Rodney H. Clurman writes Jayaprakash Narayan about the current state of the Middle East. This letter was written just days before the Six-Day war between Egypt and Israel. It is suggested that the governments of each nation, including the U.S., be prepared for the possibility of increased violence.

Letter from Ruth Decker to MLK

Ruth Decker acknowledges her complete support to organizations such as the Southern Conference Education Fund and the Fellowship of Reconciliation. She encloses a generous gift to Dr. King to aid in his struggle for peace and compares his dilemma to Gandhi's situation.

Letter from S. W. Molodtsov to MLK

The International Institute for Peace sends this letter to Dr. King on behalf of the World Council of Peace. A recent meeting undertook "a major step towards the international coordination of activities to end the war in Vietnam," and the meeting resulted the decision to host an international peace conference. Dr. King is invited to participate in the conference. The Council expresses that his presence and contribution would greatly enhance the conference's impact on anti-Vietnam efforts.

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