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Sixteenth Street Baptist Church (Birmingham, AL)

Sixteenth Street Baptist Church is a predominantly African American church in Birmingham, Alabama. Founded in 1873, it was the first black church to organize in Birmingham. During the 1960s, the church was a headquarters for blacks protesting in Alabama, often hosting Fred Shuttlesworth, James Bevel and Dr. King. On a Sunday in September 1963, three members of the Ku Klux Klan bombed the church, killing four young girls and injuring 22 others preparing for the church’s youth day. King delivered the eulogy for three of the four slain girls. The bombing brought national attention to southern racial tensions. More than $300,000 was raised to restore the church, which reopened nine months later. It has since been named a National Historic Landmark.

Associated Archive Content : 15 results

Address By Senator Edward M. Kennedy to the SCLC

Senator Edward M. Kennedy highlights Dr. King's efforts during the Civil Rights Movement. He also expresses concerns about poverty, unemployment, nonviolence, segregation and integrity.

Affidavit of Theo R. Wright

In an attempt to redirect the focus of Negro students in Birmingham, Superintendent Theo R. Wright presents a sworn affidavit detailing his responsibilities and plans to revitalize the educational direction of Birmingham Public Schools.

Civil Rights Photographic Series

These fifteen photographs chronicle several historical moments in the Civil Rights Movement.

Dr. King's Revealing Report On 'Summer of Discontent'

Dr. King's responses to the events in Birmingham, Alabama during the summer of 1963 are reported in this Chicago Sun-Times article.

Eulogy for Sixteenth Street Baptist Church Victims

This is Dr. King?s eulogy for three of the four young girls killed in the 1963 bombing of the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama. God gives man the right to exercise good and evil, King says, but God wills that everything will happen for the good ? that out of tragedy comes redemption. Martyred in the struggle for freedom, the girls have become symbols of the crusade and of the faith that sustains it. King speaks of forgiving those who murdered the girls and the need to transform the system, the way of life, and the philosophy that led to the bombing.

Eulogy for the Four Girls Who Were Murdered in the Church in Birmingham

Dr. King eulogizes the girls killed in the bombing of the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church as "martyred heroines." He asserts that their deaths will serve a greater purpose: they will shed new light on Birmingham and the civil rights struggle.

I've Been To The Mountaintop

Dr. King delivers the "I've Been to the Mountaintop" speech at the Masonic Temple in Memphis, TN.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Eleanor H. Allen

Dora McDonald responds to a letter from Eleanor Allen regarding assisting a church affected by recent bombings. McDonald encloses the address of Reverend John Cross, Pastor of 16th Baptist Church, in Birmingham, Alabama.

Letter from Robert G. Lippmann to MLK

Robert G. Lippmann requests a copy of the sermon Dr. King delivered at the Sixth Avenue Baptist Church for the funeral services of Addie Mae Collins, Denise McNair, Carole Robertson, and Cynthia Diane Wesley.

Letter from William Harris Jr and Others to MLK

The DeMolay Cosistory, No.1 convey their sympathies for the four girls killed in a church bombing. The organization pledges to take action to demand rights and equality for all.

SCLC Newsletter: October 1963

This document contains the SCLC's newletter for October 1963. The articles featured in the newsletter include: SCLC's recent accomplishments, details of the Sixteen Street Baptist Church bombing, the seventh annual SCLC convention, data regarding employment for Negroes in Alabama, and gains made in St. Augustine, Florida. Also featured are numerous photographs of Dr. King and notable Civil Rights leaders.

SCLC: Summary Of Ninth Annual Convention

This summary of the SCLC's Ninth Annual Convention describes events that were instrumental in the formation of the organization. The document outlines the ongoing projects of the organization and offers proposals for future efforts.

Telegram from Nelson Rockefeller on Church Bombing

New York Governor Nelson Rockefeller comments on the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church bombings and expresses his sympathy to the families of the four children who were killed.

Telegram from Rev. Andrew J. Young to Mrs. Rosa M. Mcghee

Rev. Andrew Young sends this telegram to Mrs. Rosa Mcghee apologizing on behalf of the SCLC for neglecting to invite the officials and members of the American Federation of Teachers.

Transcript of MLK's Rally Speech in Yazoo City, Mississippi

In this transcript of Dr. King's speech to the citizens of Yazoo City, he addresses the issues of poverty and racism within the state. He explains that while Mississippi is a in a "terrible state," it can be improved through the use of the principles of nonviolence to help bring about social change.