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Lunch Counter Sit-In, 1960

Associated Archive Content : 41 results

Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee

This pamphlet details the history, programs and purpose of The Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee.

The Ben Bella Conversation

Dr. King summarizes his recent two-hour meeting with Premier Ahmed Ben Bella of the newly-formed Algerian Republic. He mentions that Ben Bella was intimately familiar with the details of the civil rights movement and repeatedly said or inferred that “we are brothers.” King states that “the battle of the Algerians against colonialism and the battle of the Negro against segregation is a common struggle.” There are international implications for the US if it doesn’t solve its human rights problem: the nation will become a second-rate power in the world.

The Danger of A Little Progress

In Dr. King's article, The Danger of a Little Progress, he discusses the work of the SCLC and SNCC in correlation to statistics regarding integrated housing and schools, as well as discrimination in employment. Dr. King concludes that there has been little progress among blacks in Atlanta statistically.

The Dilemma of Negro Americans

In this draft of a chapter for his book Where Do We Go from Here: Chaos or Community?, Dr. King offers an in-depth description of the plight of African Americans over the past few hundred years and how it will never be fully understood by their white counterparts. He recounts the issues associated with American slavery – the dehumanization of slaves and the destruction of the family unit. He ties what happened in the past to what is occurring in the present, explaining that because of these layers of oppression African Americans have to play catch up to be seen as equals in America.

The New Frontiersmen

William Miller recaps the recent presidential elections and the important issues President John F. Kennedy will have to address. President Kennedy has proposed a new program called the New Frontier, which for many African Americans, is believed to be a part of the nonviolent Civil Rights Movement. Miller states that the Civil Rights Movement is not one that can be overlooked by the President and must be seriously addressed if he wants to stay true to his political platform.

The Story of Snick

"From Freedom High to Black Power," by Gene Roberts, describes the opposing views voiced by SNCC and Dr. King regarding the civil rights movement. SNCC asserts a message of violence and black power, while Dr. King promotes a philosophy of love and nonviolence.

The Student Movement and You: Strength in Unity

The Committee on Appeal for Human Rights in Atlanta, Georgia issued this handbill to illustrate the results of a boycott successfully conducted by African American students in Nashville, Tennessee.

The Student Voice

SNCC's Newsletter, The Student Voice, updates readers on the progress of the civil rights movement throughout the United States. This issue gives details on incidents of discrimination throughout the South, boycotts, "Stand-Ins," and education opportunities for African Americans.

The Student Voice: The Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee Newsletter

In this issue of The Student Voice, the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee writes about the progress being made in the Civil Rights Movement, including recent ... desegregation of all public golf courses in Mobile, Alabama and the desegregation of lunch counters in Atlanta, Georgia.

The Witness: MLK Writes from Birmingham Jail

"The Witness" publishes the second part of Dr. King's "Letter from Birmingham City Jail." In this pivotal document, Dr. King expresses dissatisfaction with the white moderate and the white church regarding their silent stance on segregation and discrimination. He urges individuals to understand the delays, broken promises, and intimidation Negroes face to secure their freedom.

United Auto Workers Convention Speech

Dr. King delivered this speech at the 1961 United Automobile Workers convention. He highlights the changes that have taken place in organized labor. He also connects the organized labor movement to equal opportunity in housing and the political process.

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