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Draft Proposal for Southern Regional Community Services Council

As a draft proposal for the non-profit Southern Regional Community Services Council, this document outlines the purpose and intended methodologies of the organization. The Council's mission is to train local leaders to help the unemployed and poor find jobs. Local leaders would include representation from churches, colleges, farm groups, professionals, and small businesses. Other goals are to increase living standards and cycle income back into businesses that focus on community savings and development.

Economic and Social Bill of Rights

The SCLC calls for an economic and social bill of rights to demand the inalienable rights to life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness for African Americans. It would include the right of every employable citizen to a decent job, the right of every citizen to a minimum income, the right to a decent house in a neighborhood of choice, the right to an adequate education, the right to health care, and the right to full participation in decision-making.

Employment Testing Disenfranchises Minority Groups

The U.S. Commission on Civil Rights releases a report revealing the frequency and impact of employers' discriminatory hiring procedures. Staff Director of the Commission William L. Taylor emphasizes the improper use of employment testing greatly undermines "the goal of providing equal employment opportunities for minority group members."

Entering 1964: Toward Full Emancipation

In this draft of an article for the NY Amsterdam News, Dr. King asserts that the thrust of the Negro will increase toward full emancipation as they began the year 1964. Dr. King highlights the March on Washington where both Negroes and whites collectively demonstrated the need for self-respect and human dignity in the United States. He also elaborates on the technique of "selective patronage" to broaden the economic and employment opportunities for the African American community.

Excerpts from Remarks of The Vice President

Vice President Richard M. Nixon speaks about the Eisenhower Administration’s support of Negroes in the fight to remove discrimination in employment.

Executive "Action Team" of Dr. King's SCLC Leads Aggressive Programs for Human Rights

This news release discusses programs developed by the SCLC Executive Action Team to aggressively address the human rights struggles of the American Negro. Some of these programs include the Citizenship Education Program, Operation Breadbasket and the Urban Leadership Program.

Freedom Festival Speech on Chicago Campaign

At the Freedom Festival a speech was made in regards to the Chicago Campaign. The campaign focuses on the urban renewal of the area. Specifically, it discusses the unemployment rate and housing conditions of African-Americans.

Full Opportunity Act Summary

This summary outlines and provides the provisions of each section of the proposed Full Opportunity Act.

Fundraising Letter from MLK Addressed to Friends

Dr. King writes this letter on behalf of the Workers Defense League, requesting funds to assist six South African youth who seek political protection in the U.S.

Ghettos and Segregation in City Urbanizing

Dr. King writes this speech explaining the current economic and social conditions of city ghettos. As cities urbanize, ghettos expand and segregation increases. "The ghetto has become the hallmark of our major cities just as truly as the cities themselves are becoming the hallmark of the nation." Though the last thirty years has seen advancements in legislation, what remains unrecognized is the gap between legislation intent and the actualization of community programs that have tangible affects on the neighborhoods.

Hosea Williams' SCLC Voter Registration Department Report

Hosea Williams' Bi-Annual Report from the Department on Voter Registration and Political Education gives an overview of the department's work; lists the field secretaries, project leaders and field organizers; and summarizes SCLC's eight state programs.

Housing for Negroes in Atlanta, Georgia

This document discusses the critical need of housing for Negroes in Atlanta, Georgia. The role of Atlanta Urban League and the federal Housing Administration in seeking housing for Negroes are discussed and unpublished Commission on Race and Housing reports are exposed that illustrate housing discrimination in Atlanta between 1945 and 1958.

Housing Report to the SCLC Board of Directors

Members of the SCLC Board of Directors were the recipients of this detailed report outlining solutions to end the slum crisis in the North.

How Much Head Start for Mississippi's Children?

Kay Longcope describes the current status of the Child Development Group of Mississippi following the decision to pull funding for the program made by the Office of Economic Opportunity.

How Urban League Helps City on Day-to-Day Basis

In this article, the council, activities, and contributions of the Urban League are discussed. Edwin C. Berry, the league's executive secretary, believes that contributions have decreased due to the league's refusal to take a stand against civil rights demonstrations. Mr. Berry is hopeful that contributors will return their support to make Chicago a "hallmark of democracy."

Hruska Says Capital...

Nebraska Senator Roman Hruska criticizes the Dr. King-led demonstrations and asserts that the government does not really know what the demonstrator's goals are.

Hungry Club Speech

This document is a draft copy of Dr. King's Hungry Club Speech, in which he speaks on the subject "America's Chief Moral Dilemma." He states that the dilemma is "the means by which we live have out distanced the ends for which we live." Dr. King thoroughly discusses the three major evils that contribute to this dilemma: the evil of racism, the evil poverty, and the evil of war. He also discusses the progress of the Civil Rights Movement as it enters a new phase of fighting for "genuine equality."

I've Been to the Mountaintop

Dr. King gave this address at the Mason Temple in Memphis, Tennessee the night before he was assassinated. He called for nonviolent protest and a boycott of Memphis area businesses in support of the Memphis Sanitation Workers strike. Conveying a sense of foreboding, he not only recounted a near-death experience when he was stabbed near the heart, but also spoke of the possibility of his own demise at the hands of those who opposed him.

Information about Poor People's Campaign

The Poor Peoples Campaign asserts that it will demand decent jobs and income for poor Americans of all races and ethnicities. Furthermore the Campaign vows to address constitutional and moral rights, along with the rights of exploited immigrants.

Information on the National Welfare Rights Organization

The National Welfare Rights Organization (NWRO) is a nationwide membership organization of welfare recipients. The goals of the NWRO are to develop a system that guarantees adequate income, dignity, justice and democracy.

Interview Outline for WAII-TV Show-Profile Emory University Atlanta, Georgia

This document outlines Dr. Edward T. Ladd's interview with Dr. King, for broadcast on WAII-TV's program "Profile Emory University."

Introduction to the Demands of the Freedom Movement

The Negros in Chicago are faced with numerous systematic societal restrictions as they are excluded from many aspects of an American life. The Negros are subjected to segregation and substandard housing that are identified as "crime-infested slums." The plight of the Negro in Chicago involves insufficient housing and education as well as economic and social exclusion.

Introduction to the Demands of the Freedom Movement

This document discusses the injustices and inequalities that Negroes are facing in Chicago's urban communities. The author outlines the struggles blacks endure in a variety of different arenas such as racism, discrimination, poverty, unemployment and segregation.

Invitation from the Negro American Labor Council to MLK

On behalf of the Negro American Labor Council, August Hill invites Dr. King to visit Racine, Wisconsin. He tells Dr. King that they are suffering from problems regarding employment in addition to all of the other inequalities. He also says that their community is not involved and that they need to be concerned about the issues in their society.

Invitation to Emergency Convocation: The Urban Coalition

This letter from Andrew Heiskell and A. Philip Randolph invites Dr. King to attend the Emergency Convocation of the Urban Coalition, to address the issue of violence in 104 cities. The goals set forth in the letter include an emergency work program, a major expansion of the private sector for job provision and training, and establishment of a long-range program for the physical and social reconstruction of American cities.

Is Nonviolence Doomed To Fail?

Dr. King enumerates the accomplishments made in the fight for civil rights through nonviolent practices. Additionally, he utilizes this article in the Associated Negro Press to discredit the claim that nonviolence is losing shape in the United States.

It is Not Enough to Condemn Black Power...

Dr. King addresses the "Black Power" movement in this two-page document. He also explains his thoughts and experiences relating to the tactics and goals of the Civil Rights Movement.

J. M. Douglas Expresses Concern about the Influx of Cuban Imigrants

J. M. Douglas writes Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. to express his concern for the influx of Cubans in America. He fears that jobs for young Negros are at stake and suggests that Dr. King include the concern in his demands for the March on Washington.

Join the Ranks! Support A Worker

An SCLC field worker writes to gain support for the SCLC so that the organization can fulfill its mission to help blacks "achieve full citizenship rights, stimulate nonviolent mass action, and secure the right to vote."

KCLS Radio Editorial about MLK

James C. Garchow, of KCLS Radio, sent Dr. King a transcript of an editorial to comply with the Fairness Doctrine of the F.C.C. that mandates an opportunity to reply to such commentary.

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