Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

War and Morals

Associated Archive Content : 125 results

"Attorney's Arrest is Protested"

This Washington Post article, entitled "Attorney's Arrest is Protested", talks about Arthur Kinoy's arrest and the complications that aroused as a result of it.

"How To Make History"

Mr. Eisenman acknowledges the irony of how America, which was created after a war of liberation, has now gone against everything it was founded upon.

1966 Notes on the War

Dr. King annotates a speech to address his concerns about the war in Vietnam and his duties as a civil rights leader.

1967 Geneva Convocation

Dr. King provides introductory remarks to participants of the Pacem In Terris II Convocation held in Geneva, Switzerland. He addresses several moral and political concerns as it relates war and Vietnam.

A Historian Looks at Our Political Morality

Liberal historian Henry Steele Commager writes on the political morality of the United States. He asserts that the United States is not above the historical tendency to become corrupt, and the issue will become more important as the United States grows more powerful. He argues that the United States must reconcile the "principles of law and of morality."

A Knock At Midnight

In a tape-recorded address to the Riverside Church in New York City, Dr. King compares the civil rights struggle to a parable from St. Luke. His sermon specifically tackles contemporary social issues such as segregation, discrimination, and the philosophy of nonviolence. In addition, Dr. King explores the role of the church in dealing with such problems.

A Proposal for Unity Day

Joseph Polowsky composed a proposal to present to the United Nations for the creation of an April 25th holiday, to be known as Unity Day. This holiday is in commemoration of a conference of the war-time allied nations in San Francisco.

Address by MLK to the National Press Club

During an address to the National Press Club in Washington, Dr. King declares the time for racial justice has arrived.

Address to the National Bar Association

Dr. King shares with the National Bar Association of Milwaukee, the history of segregation and why African Americans fight for equality.

America's Chief Moral Dilemma

Dr. King's address to the Hungry Club highlights an array of issues that relate to America's "Moral Dilemma." Dr. King explains the three major evil dilemmas that face the nation: war, poverty, and racism.

American Influence in Vietnam

Dr. John C. Bennett, President of the Union Theological Seminary, expresses his political beliefs concerning the presence of American military in Vietnam.

Antidotes For Fear

Dr. King uses this sermon to discuss the causation of human fears while identifying four ways in which these shortcomings can be combated. He does not promote the eradication of all human fears, for some are essential to creation and innovation. However, Dr. King encourages the elimination of unfounded fears as a method to overcome adversities that are experienced in life.

Black Power

This is a chapter sermon for Dr. King's book "Where Do We Go From Here?" The civil rights leader traces the early development of Black Power and its eventual surge onto the national political scene. Though understood as a direct opposition to the nonviolent movement that organizations like SCLC, CORE, and SNCC originally supported, King describes Black Power as a "disappointment wrapped in despair."

Bond and The Constitution

The author of this article argues that the Georgia State Legislature's refusal to seat Horace Julian Bond represents a great injustice. The author asserts that Mr. Bond was refused a seat due to his views on American foreign policy and the issue of race.

Bread at Midnight

"The Mennonite," issued by The Board of Education and Publication of the General Conference Mennonite Church, features an article by Dr. King entitled "Bread at Night." Dr. King begins with a parable that demonstrates not only the power of prayer, but provides metaphors for the state of America and thinking material for the role of the church during that time period.

Crisis of Culture

Dr. King refers to his note card on "morality" and cites an example of the crisis of culture.

Detroit Free Press: Dr. King Strengthens an Anti-War Coalition

This article, which appeared in the 'As We See It' column of the Detroit Free Press, reports Dr. King's speech in New York from April 4, 1967 on his opposition to the Vietnam War.

Does MLK Have the Right? the Qualifications? the Duty? to Speak Out on Peace

SCLC National Executive Director Andrew Young addresses recent articles criticizing Dr. King's expressions on peace. Young argues that these attacks are largely based on misconceptions of Dr. King's views. He states that the media is quick to attack Dr. King, but whenever critics retract their statements, nothing is reported. To combat this, Young includes a sampling of accurate articles on Dr. King to "redress the imbalance."

Don B. Pratt's Position Statement

Don Pratt expresses concerns about his induction into the US Army during the Vietnam War. Mr. Pratt questions the morality of this "aggressive" war, which would enable him to inflict violence against his "neighbors" of Vietnam.

Draft of SCLC 1964 Annual Report

This is a draft of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference 1964 Annual Report. The document outlines developments that occurred in pursuits such as voter registration and Operation Breadbasket. The piece concludes with commentary on the future of the organization, specifically "deeper involvement in political action."

Ebenezer Church Bulletin and President Kennedy's Eulogy

This is an Ebenezer Baptist Church bulletin expressing appreciation for the congregation's various acts of kindness toward one another. On the opposite side of the bulletin, an outline can be found for a memorial speech for the late President Kennedy.

Face the Nation Interview

This is a transcript of an August 1965 interview of Dr. King on the CBS television news program Face the Nation. King is asked to comment on numerous issues facing American society including the conflict in Vietnam, civil rights, housing and birth control.

How 700 Ibos were Killed by Mistake

This article reports on the massacre of 700 Ibos by federal troops in the Ibo town of Asaba, Nigeria.

KCLS Radio Editorial about MLK

James C. Garchow, of KCLS Radio, sent Dr. King a transcript of an editorial to comply with the Fairness Doctrine of the F.C.C. that mandates an opportunity to reply to such commentary.

King Calls for Anti-War Referendum

Dr. King announces a nationwide campaign to give Americans an opportunity to vote on the Vietnam War. He explains that the local initiative is a unique and dramatic way for the people to deliver their mandate against the war.

Letter From a Very Concerned Christian to MLK

The Christian author of this letter includes a poem to express concern and anguish regarding the War in Vietnam.

Letter from A. S. Young to MLK

Mr. Young criticizes Dr. King and the black community for their support of heavyweight champion Cassius Clay's refusal to be drafted into the military. He also expresses worry about the quality of black leadership and urges a move from a selfish focus on Negroes only to concern for all people.

Letter from A.C. Spectorsky to MLK

Editorial Director, A.C. Spectorsky, requests comments from Dr. King regarding an interview with Senator Charles Percy from the April issue of PLAYBOY Magazine. The Illinois Republican
discusses a range of subjects including American military presence in Vietnam, President Lyndon B. Johnson's leadership style, and Negro-white relations.

Letter from A.J. de Witte to Roy Wilkins

A.J. de Witte conveys his dissatisfaction to Roy Wilkins over the NAACP's criticism of Dr. King's opposition to the Vietnam War. De Witte withdraws his financial support to the NAACP, instead contributing to Dr. King, Stokley Carmichael of SNCC and Floyd McKissick of CORE.

Letter from Abram Eisenman to MLK

Abram Eisenman, a 1968 candidate for President of the United States, requested Dr. King's assistance in his campaign for the New Hampshire ballot.

Pages