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United States. Dept. of Justice

Associated Archive Content : 115 results

Telegram from Alabama Christian Movement for Human Rights to MLK

The Alabama Christian Movement for Human Rights and its executives offer support to Dr. King, who is imprisoned in the Albany jail.

Telegram from Charles McDew to MLK

Charles McDew petitions the assistance of Dr. King in pursuing a federal investigation of the shootings of several civil rights activists in Mississippi and Southwest Georgia. Charles McDew issued this telegram as a representative of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee.

Telegram from MLK and Wyatt T. Walker to Samual Weston

Wyatt T. Walker and Dr. King sent this telegram to Samual Weston informing him that they were requesting an investigation of his complaint.

Telegram from MLK and Wyatt Walker to Burke Marshall

Dr. King and Wyatt Walker send an urgent request for Burke Marshall to investigate the bombing of SCLC Board Member C. O. Simpkins' home in Shreveport, Louisiana. The two SCLC officials inform Mr. Marshall that the suspects were released for lack of evidence despite other information to the contrary.

Telegram from MLK and Wyatt Walker to Burke Marshall

Dr. King and Rev. Wyatt Tee Walker send a urgent request to Burke Marshall of the United States Department of Justice. The two ministers seek a federal investigation in the brutal beating of an SCLC Voter Registration worker in Georgia.

Telegram from MLK to Attorney General Kennedy

Dr. King writes to Attorney General Robert Kennedy regarding the safety of Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth during his 90 day jail sentence.

Telegram from MLK to Attorney General Robert Kennedy

Dr. King sends Attorney General Robert Kennedy a copy of the telegram he sent to Vice President Lyndon Johnson. The city of St. Augustine, Florida refuses to desegregate its facilities, which Dr. King describes as a "denial of Negro citizenship."

Telegram from MLK to Robert Kennedy

Dr. King alerts Attorney General Robert Kennedy of the brutal treatment against Negroes attempting register to vote in Greenville, Mississippi. He asks Kennedy to intervene in an effort to protect the lives of those individuals working for the right to vote.

Telegram from MLK to Robert Kennedy

Dr. King requests a meeting with Attorney General Robert Kennedy regarding voter registration.

Telegram from MLK to Robert Kennedy

Dr. King informs Attorney General Robert Kennedy of Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth's arrest and expresses his concern for Shuttleworth's safety due to recent threatening activities directed toward nonviolent leaders.

Telegram from MLK to Robert Kennedy

Dr. King issues an urgent request for Robert Kennedy's immediate involvement in the prosecution of four students who were arrested while engaged in a peaceful demonstration in Jackson, Mississippi. Dr. King has also received information of gross violations of the students' constitutional rights.

Telegram from MLK to US Attorney General Nicholas Katzenbach

Dr. King asks Attorney General Nicholas Katzenbach for an investigation of voter irregularities in the Georgia Democratic primary election.

Telegram from MLK to US Attorney General Nicholas Katzenbach

Dr. King writes US Attorney General Nicholas Katzenbach to inform him of the reports of "known election irregularities" he is receiving concerning the next day's Georgia Democratic primary election.

Telegram from MLK to William Dawson

Dr. King informs William Dawson that the SCLC approves the plan to "transfer the Community Relations Service to the Department of Justice."

Telegram from President Johnson to MLK

President Lyndon B. Johnson writes to Dr. King sympathizing with his concern over the incidents that occurred in Philadelphia, Mississippi. King was continuing the March Against Fear of James Meredith, who was shot by a sniper on June 6. A rally in Philadelphia commemorating the murder two years earlier of three civil rights activists was angrily attacked by a white mob. Homes of blacks were later sprayed with gunfire.

Telegram from Robert F. Kennedy to SCLC

On the occasion of SCLC’s Annual Convention, Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy states that the country has made great strides toward the realization of SCLC’s goal of assuring the rights of citizenship to all. The Department of Justice has acted and will continue to act to protect the right to vote.

Telegram from Robert F. Kennedy to Wyatt Tee Walker

Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy writes to Wyatt Tee Walker regarding the progress of the SCLC. Kennedy believes that the right to vote will eliminate "continued discrimination and injustice."

Telegram From the National Committee For Free Elections to MLK Regarding 1967 Sunflower County, Mississippi Elections

Dr. King requests a meeting with Attorney General William Ramsey Clark, to discuss the need for federal voting registrars to oversee upcoming elections in rural Mississippi counties. In these elections, Negroes will run as candidates for the first time in American history.

Telegram Text from MLK to USAG Robert Kennedy

Dr. King requests that Attorney General Robert Kennedy intervene in New Orleans to prevent further intimidation of civil rights supporters by police.

Telegrams from MLK to John and Robert Kennedy

In these draft telegrams, Dr. King requests a meeting with President John Kennedy and Attorney General Robert Kennedy to address the imminent crisis in the South.

Terror in Louisiana

The article describes the terrorist actions occurring within the area of north Louisiana. An African American dentist by the name of C.O. Simpkins was one of the victims targeted due to his activism in Civil Rights. Due to Simpkins large presence within the movement, his house was bombed and burned down. This is just one example of the constant hatred and violence many African Americans had to go through to gain equality within the South.

U.S. News & World Report: Negro Leaders Tell Their Plans for '64

Past, present and future efforts in the area of civil rights are discussed in interviews of five organizational leaders in the civil rights movement. These leaders are: Whitney M. Young, Jr. of the National Urban League, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. of the SCLC, Roy Wilkins of the NAACP, James L. Farmer of CORE, and James Forman of SNCC.

Unitarian Universalist Statement of Consensus on Racial Injustice

The Fifth General Assembly of the Unitarian Universalist Association listed several laws adopted by the association. Some of the laws incorporate civil rights, demonstrations, voting rights, equality, civil disobedience, and discrimination in employment and housing.

War on Poverty

Dr. King calls for the end of poverty in the African American community through the mobilization of interracial coalitions. He states that the negative effects of discriminatory laws will not cease to end by the enforcement of the Civil Rights Bill, nor will it cease if the laws were immediately repealed, but only by the building of alliances among the black and white communities will these issues be eliminated.

White House Message on Civil Rights

President Johnson's message to Congress explains strides the U.S. has made in the social, educational and economic conditions of minorities in America. It also discusses areas that need improvement such as infant mortality rates and poverty levels among non-whites. The President calls for legislation to prevent violence against those exercising their civil rights, to strengthen enforcement powers of the Equal Employment Opportunities Commission, to prevent discrimination on federal and state juries, and to guarantee fair housing.

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