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United States. Dept. of Justice

Associated Archive Content : 115 results

Letter from Burke Marshall to MLK

Burke Marshall, Assistant Attorney General, writes Dr. King in response to a telegram sent by the Reverend protesting action be taken by the State of Louisiana against the Southern Conference Educational Fund.

Letter from Burke Marshall to MLK

Burke Marshall, Assistant Attorney General, writes Dr. King acknowledging his previous telegram about racism in St. Augustine, Florida. In addition, Marshall refers a copy of the telegram to the attention of George B. Hartzog, Jr.

Letter from Clarence B. Jones to the Editor of New York Times

Clarence Jones writes the editor of the New York Times to comment on a statement made by James Reston. According to Mr. Jones the statement was factually inaccurate and partially paraphrased.

Letter from Clarence Henry to Robert F. Kennedy

Clarence Henry requests the immediate surveillance of Fred Shuttleworth's home by Kennedy's office in lieu of Reverend Fred Shuttlesworth's arrest.

Letter from Curtis Cosby to MLK

Curtis Cosby, writing on behalf of the Esquires Club, encourages Dr. King to support attorney Donald Hollowell as the replacement for judge Boyd Sloan in order to place a Negro in a high level federal position.

Letter from Curtis W. Harris to US Attorney General Nicholas Katzenbach

Curtis W. Harris demands that the United States Justice Department intervene in Virginia's school systems to prevent discrimination in how tax funds are used for public education. Mr. Harris reports that Negroes continue to be excluded from serving on local school boards and this exclusion "constitutes discrimination and is a violation of Federal law."

Letter from Dora McDonald to Miss Rankin at the US Justice Department

Dora McDonald sends Miss Rankin of the Justice Department a copy of a statement made by Dr. King before the Republican Party. The statement was in reference to his proposed "Bill of Rights for the Disadvantaged."

Letter from Eunice Janousek to MLK

Eunice Janousek requests that Dr. King review materials in the matter of the Blakey case with the hope that he can provide assistance to those who are being oppressed in South Dakota.

Letter from Grandison Cherry-El to MLK

Grandison Cherry-El, Minister with The Moorish Science Temple of America, contacts US Attorney General Nicholas Katzenbak in reference to discrimination in citizenship in American public schools.

Letter from Howard Schomer to Robert Kennedy

Howard Schomer asks the US Attorney General several questions about the legality of a police raid that occurred at a Southern Conference Educational Fund (SCEF) office in New Orleans, Louisiana. Schomer wants to know if the statute under which the raid was carried out has legal force and does the Department of Justice have an obligation to make its evidence public?

Letter from Jay Richard Kennedy to MLK

Jay Kennedy encloses a copy of a picture and a transcript from a television program that included Dr. King. He thanks Dr. King for an earlier letter and explains that their views are aligned. Kennedy also briefly discusses civil rights in America and the federal government.

Letter from John Edgar Hoover to All Law Enforcement Officials

In this letter, President Hoover addresses all F.B.I. law enforcement officials. He discusses America's opposition to communism and describes it as an "insidious menace." However, Hoover warns that "attributing every adversity to communism" is ineffective and senseless. Instead he suggests that in order to defeat communism, it must be thoroughly studied and analyzed.

Letter from MLK to Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy

Dr. King writes Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy to commend him for his courage and work in directing the Civil Rights Act of 1964 through Congress.

Letter from MLK to Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy

Dr. King describes Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy's efforts as "courageous" and "effective" in guiding Congress to establish the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter from MLK to Attorney General Robert Kennedy

Dr. King writes to Attorney General Robert Kennedy requesting an investigation in Williamston, NC to relieve the Negro community from violence and "unconstitutional police action."

Letter from MLK to Berl Bernhard

Dr. King writes Berl Bernhard, Staff Director of the Commission on Civil Rights, to introduce him to Mrs. Walter Lee Mengledorff. Mrs. Mengledorff is a resident of Savannah, Georgia, and "has concrete evidence on voting irregularities in Chatham County, Georgia. She is interested in bringing the whole matter to the attention of the Commission on Civil Rights.

Letter from MLK to Burke Marshall of the US Justice Department

Dr. King writes Burke Marshall, Assistant Attorney General in the Civil Rights Division of the Department of Justice, expressing gratitude for Marshall's leadership in guiding the Civil Rights Act of 1964 through both houses of Congress.

Letter from MLK to Robert F. Kennedy

Dr. King informs Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy that if the proposed Civil Rights Bill of 1964 is "weakened at any point" that civil disobedience will follow and it will be the fault of those that "watered down the bill."

Letter from MLK to Robert Kennedy

Dr. King urges Attorney General Kennedy to act on behalf of the Negro citizens in LeFlore County who are being attacked for working in voter registration or becoming registered voters.

Letter From Paul Brest to Members of the SCLC

Paul Brest, on behalf of Marian E. Wright, alerts Dr. King and other SCLC staff members about legal initiatives to desegregate schools in Mississippi and other southern states.

Letter from Robert F. Kennedy to MLK

Dr. King receives this letter from U.S. Attorney General Robert Kennedy regarding his testimony outlining his position on civil rights before the House Judiciary Committee.

Letter from Robert F. Kennedy to MLK

Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy expresses appreciation to Dr. King for agreeing to give an oral history interview for the JFK Library.

Letter from Robert Green to US Attorney General Nicholas Katzenbach

SCLC Education Director Robert Green writes Attorney General Nicholas Katzenbach requesting a federal intervention on discrimination practices in Mississippi. Green complains that members of SCLC, SNCC, CORE and other organizations were denied access to restrooms during the 1966 James Meredith March Against Fear.

Letter from Robert Johnson Smith to MLK

Mr. Smith invites Dr. King to be a special guest at the Annual Men's Day at Salem Baptist Church. He also asks Dr. King to recommend Herbert C. Nelson for appointment as a federal judge.

Letter from Robert Kennedy to MLK

Attorney General Robert Kennedy addresses the prosecutions that involved leaders from the Albany Movement. Kennedy discusses these details and facts of the case with Dr. King.

Letter from Robert Kennedy to MLK

Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy writes to Dr. King regarding a case of civil disobedience in Albany, Georgia. He discusses the boycotting of Carl Smith's supermarket due to Smith serving as a juror in the civil action case of Ware vs. Johnson.

Letter from Robert Kennedy to MLK

Robert Kennedy writes Dr. King requesting to interview him for an oral history program on the Kennedy Administration. Kennedy asserts, "You are obviously one of the persons who ought to be interviewed in order to get a full record of the Administration."

Letter from the Faculty of the Tuskegee Institute to President Kennedy

Members of the faculty and staff of Tuskegee Institute issue a plea to President John F. Kennedy to intervene in the Birmingham crisis of 1963. They request that the President use an upcoming speech to discuss Constitutional rights, send the FBI to Alabama to investigate "charges of police brutality," and revoke federal funds that support segregation and persuade business leaders to desegregate public facilities.

Letter from Thelton Henderson to MLK

Mr. Henderson, of the University of California-Berkeley, invites Dr. King to participate in a Civil Rights Symposium. Notable persons such as Robert Kennedy and Stokley Carmichael previously appeared at the symposium.

Letter from Thomas Price to MLK

Major Thomas Price, United States Army, requests Dr. King's assistance in retaining his commission and active duty service with the United States Army.

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