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Housing

Associated Archive Content : 348 results

Letter from Jodi Moses to MLK about TAC Rally

The Community Relations Committee of the Tenant's Action Council (TAC) writes this letter to Dr. King asking him to speak at a rally being held at the Olivet Community Presbyterian Church in Chicago, Illinois.

Letter from John A. McDermott Copied to Al Raby and MLK

John A. McDermott, Executive Director of the Catholic Interracial Council, writes to Al Raby and Dr. King. Mr. McDermott describes the Council's involvement with the Chicago Freedom Movement. Mr. McDermott also expresses his appreciation for Mr. Raby and Dr. King's support in the fight for fair housing legislation in Chicago. McDermott goes on to describe the Movement struggle with the controversial Atomic Energy Commission project in Weston, Illinois.

Letter from John A. McDermott to Chicago Daily News

John McDermott anticipates discrimination in housing and job opportunities as a result of a proposed federal project for a nuclear power plant in Illinois. Ideally, The Weston Project should create equal opportunities for both black and white Americans. McDermott expresses concern considering the current conditions of racial injustice that exists in Illinois.

Letter from John and Enid Howarth to Friends Soliciting Financial Support

Mr. and Mrs. Howarth of New Mexico express their disapproval of violence against Negroes in the South and request donations for a Fourth of July celebration in support of SCLC, SNCC and other civil rights groups.

Letter from Juanita McKinly to MLK

Juanita McKinly requests Dr. King visit her home to evaluate the less than standard living conditions of the building. As a key figure for addressing social ills, many people sought the help of Dr. King in relation to individual concerns.

Letter from Julian Bond to Voters

Georgia State Representative Julian Bond requests support for his Georgia House of Representatives re-election bid. Mr. Bond elaborates on planks in his campaign platform concerning education, housing, and employment. Bond was also a long time civil rights activist who helped found the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee.

Letter from June Alder to MLK

Mrs. Alder expresses her support and concern regarding integrated housing.

Letter from L. Martinez to MLK

Mrs. L. Martinez describes to Dr. King what she has observed about the Lawndale area in Chicago, Illinois. She suggests that instead of relocating to other neighborhoods, the tenants of Lawndale initiate a clean up of the area themselves.

Letter from Leon Despres to MLK

Leon M. Despres, Alderman of the Fifth Ward of Chicago, welcomes Dr. King to the city. Despres expresses his appreciation for King's visit and encourages as much help as possible to help rid Chicago of their current system of segregation.

Letter from Leonard Spacek to MLK

Leonard Spacek of Arthur Andersen & Co. thanks Dr. King for recent comments about open housing in Chicago.

Letter from Lewis Conrad to MLK

The Penn Unitarian Fellowship of the University of Pennsylvania extends an invitation to Dr. King to meet with the student body for an informal discussion. The university desires Dr. King to converse with several race relation classes for a more realistic perspective from an active leader in the movement. Due to the growing population of the African American community in Philadelphia, it is the university's hope that Dr. King will address social issues specifically in Philadelphia.

Letter from Linda Gillies to MLK

Chairman of the Choice '68 Steering Committee, Linda Gillies asks Dr. King about his stance on referendum issues. Topics that Dr. King was asked to respond to included King's opinion on what military action the U.S. should have in Vietnam, the course of action the US should pursue regarding bombing North Vietnam and governmental spending.

Letter from M. L. Banner to MLK

The board of directors of the Booker T. Washington Center, Inc. requests Dr. King to serve as the guest speaker for their annual banquet. The Booker T. Washington Center is the only predominately Negro Welfare Agency in the community.

Letter from M. L. Teer Regarding Housing Conditions

M. L. Teer writes a letter to Senator Robert F. Kennedy on behalf of her nephew, Robert Williams of Chicago, IL.

Letter from M.J. McGrayle to MLK

M.J. McGrayle from Chicago expresses his or her concerns to Dr. King. McGrayle does not understand some of the actions of African Americans and disagrees with Dr. King's marches. The author believes that many of the events taking place within the Civil Rights Movement are further separating the races, as "black people are afraid of" whites. As a white person, McGrayle states, "I lived in Birmingham, Ala[bama] and took the colored peoples part," though now in disagreement, will "do nothing more for the colored people."

Letter from Mae Martin to MLK

Mae Martin of Little Rock, Arkansas, writes to Dr. King in response to one of his public statements. She speaks about race relations in her city and points out that there is good and bad within both the white and black communities.

Letter from Manie Callahan to MLK

Manie Callahan expresses her admiration to Dr. King and informs him of the passing of her parents which left her with a five bedroom apartment. Callahan understands the lack of opportunity for Negroes in the south and offers her home to a deserving married couple looking for work. She trusts Dr. King's judgment of character and hopes to hear from him soon.

Letter from Marion Logan to MLK

Marion Logan writes to Dr. King to discuss his possible involvement with Project H. "Project H calls for Black America to demand of Congress ten billion dollars now to appropriate for the Federal Housing...that are administered by HUD."

Letter from Martha Roberts to MLK

Martha Roberts, of Scranton, Pennsylvania, chastises Dr. King for leading marches and speaking against the war in Vietnam. She expresses to Dr. King that his focus should be on teaching "your people" to learn trades, enhance education and accept gradual change.

Letter from Martin Kessler to MLK

Martin Kessler sends Dr. King an article by Daniel P. Moynihan entitled "Is There Really an Urban Crisis?" Moynihan addresses issues of the economic and social conditions in America in the interview with Challenge Magazine.

Letter from Mary B. Courtney to MLK

Mary B. Courtney requests Dr. King's help to sell her property. She explains to him that the house has been on the market for three years in St. Petersburg, Florida, and while "several colored people" have contacted the real estate agency with interest, they are dissuaded by the lack of African Americans in the neighborhood. The author suggests that Dr. King contact some of his associates in St. Petersburg to assist in the matter.

Letter from Miss Ethel Klemm to MLK

Miss Ethel Klemm, a retired white teacher from Mississippi, suggests that Dr. King ease on trying to push for intergration so rapidly. She recommends that, thru education and job training, Negroes will be in a better position to be accepted and integrated into mainstream society.

Letter from MLK and Albert A. Raby

Albert Raby and Dr. King assert that the Weston project is "a national test case for the integrity of Title VI of the 1964 Civil Rights Act." The population of Negroes in DuPage County is extremely low and the jobs would not offer for them an equal opportunity.

Letter from MLK to Dr. Milton Rokeach

In this letter, Dr. King writes to Dr. Rokeach concerning the involvement of social scientists and the civil rights movement. Dr. King encourages Dr. Rokeach to become actively involved with the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Letter from MLK to Frances H. Vicario

Dr. King expresses gratitude to Mrs. Vicario and the Chemical Bank New York Trust Company for their generous contribution to the SCLC. He explains how the contribution will help in a time of need as the SCLC enters the critical phase of their ten-year ministry.

Letter from MLK to Laura R. Daly

Dr. King apologizes to Laura Daly for his delayed response and expresses his appreciation for her financial contribution. He states that the "new democracy" that has emerged in the south would not be possible without the moral and financial support from contributors such as Miss Daly. He discusses how there is still work to accomplish and the SCLC will continue their efforts in the freedom struggle.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Jack E. Wood, Jr.

Dr. King extended his appreciation to Mr. Jack E. Wood, Jr. for the letter and copy of Mr. Wood's speech given on the Demonstration Cities Program.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Elizabeth T. Babcock

Dr. King expresses his most sincere gratitude for Mrs. Elizabeth T. Babcock's support of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Theodore A. Dilday

Dr. King writes Mrs. Dilday of Riverside Baptist Church to express his appreciation for her two contributions to the SCLC. He explains the current works of the SCLC in Chicago and Alabama and stresses the importance of supporters like her.

Letter from MLK to President Johnson

Dr. King requests government assistance for the impoverished communities of the Mississippi Delta. He then provides a course of action to improve the standard of living within those communities.

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