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United Nations

Associated Archive Content : 154 results

Letter from UN Ambassador Adlai Stevenson to MLK

Adlai Stevenson, the United States Representative to the United Nations, invites Dr. King to attend an upcoming meeting "to discuss current developments" in policy decisions on Africa.

Letter from UN Ambassador Adlai Stevenson to MLK

Adlai Stevenson of the United Nations informs Dr. King that their meeting will have to be rescheduled due to his duties as UN Security Council President. Stevenson wishes to converse with Dr. King about issues relating to the continent of Africa.

Letter from UN Ambassador Adlai Stevenson to MLK

Adlai Stevenson, US Ambassador to the United Nations, thanks Dr. King for a previous letter and for Dr. King's attendance at a reception at the United States Mission. Stevenson also congratulates Dr. King on his Nobel Peace Prize acceptance speech.

Letter from Walter Martin to SCLC Officials

Walter Martin of the American Friends Service Committee, writes to numerous SCLC officials concerning Quaker work in Southern Africa.

Letter from William Rutherford to MLK

William Rutherford expresses his enthusiasm for being a new addition to Dr. King's team. Rutherford also encloses newspaper clipping on the Pacem in Terris meetings.

Letter from William W. Boyer to MLK

This Letter from William W. Boyer, Chairman of the Convocations Committee, to Dr. King informs Dr. King the transcription of his "Future of Integration" speech to the Kansas State University academic community has arrived. A copy of the transcription will be published in Issues 1968.
This enclosed transcription of his speech addresses many varied issues affecting American society.

Letter to Dora McDonald from Fernando Arias-Salgado

Fernando Arias-Salgado acknowledges receipt of Ms. McDonald's letter on behalf of Dr. King and transmits it to Dr. Palasi in Madrid. He also encloses the initial letter of invitation to lecture at the University of Madrid under the signature of Dr. Villar, Director of Cultural Sociology.

Letter to the Editor of Chicago Daily News Regarding Israeli Statehood

This letter from Mrs. Irene M. Koch to the editor of the Chicago Daily News addresses the issue of anti-Semitism and the Israeli War in 1967. Mrs. Koch, while not anti-Semitic, does not support the war Israel is prosecuting against its Arab Neighbors. Mrs. Koch draws parallels between Israel's war and the United State's involvement in Vietnam.

Letter to the Editor of the New York Times

On April 15, 1967, a massive antiwar demonstration was held in New York City. Demonstrators marched from Central Park to the United Nations building where they were addressed by prominent political activists such as Dr. King, Floyd McKissick, Stokely Carmichael, James Bevel, Jan Berry Crumb, and Dr. Benjamin Spock. In this letter, a veteran and demonstrator writes the Editor of the New York Times to express his critical view of an article that reported on the event.

Letters from Ambassadors

Dr. King notes the letters that he has received from several Ambassadors. He also notes the confirmed appointments with the Ambassadors.

Martin Luther King Does It Again

Ralph C. Bailey, a marcher in the New York City demonstration against the War in Vietnam, describes the demonstration as an "impressive spectacle" of people of all ages and races. He praises Dr. King for combining revolution with nonviolence in hopes of a peaceful demonstration.

Memorandum from Pacem In Terris II to All Participants

This memorandum from the Pacem In Terris II Secretariat issues detailed arrival and departure instructions to all participants of the Pacem In Terris Convocation. General conference information is also included. Translated as "Peace on Earth," the event was held in Geneva, Switzerland and accommodated participants from around the world. Dr. King attended the conference and delivered an address.

Men of Past and Present Pamphlet

This pamphlet features quotes 'Men of Past and Present,' including religious and political leaders, on democracy and cooperatives.

Methodist Church Statement on Vietnam Conflict

The Board of Christian Social Concerns of the Methodist Church releases a statement regarding the conflict in Vietnam and possible outcomes and solutions. The board urges steps leading to a withdrawal of US forces from Vietnam.

MLK Address to a North Carolina Branch of the NAACP

Dr. King addresses a public meeting of Charlotte, North Carolina's NAACP branch. He lists five actions the Negro can do to assist America with realizing the dream. The Negro must challenge the system of segregation, make efforts to gain ballots, and sacrifice to achieve freedom.

MLK Speaks Before the NAACP at Winston-Salem

This program for the Winston-Salem branch of the NAACP highlights Dr. King as the guest speaker.

MLK Statement at Pacem In Terris II Convocation

Dr. King's introductory remarks at the Pacem In Terris II Convocation critiques the United States' involvement in Vietnam.

MLK Statement at Peace Event in Geneva

Dr. King delivered this statement in Geneva at the Pacem In Terris ("Peace on Earth") II Convocation about the "costly, bloody and futile war in Vietnam."

MLK's Reply to an Invitation

Dr. King regrets to inform Robin Skuce of his inability to accept her invitation to speak at a seminar for a Canadian high school under the auspice of the United Nations Association in Canada. Dr. King informs Miss Skuce that he must decline her offer due to preparation of several SCLC programs scheduled for the following year.

MLK's Statement in Regards to Adlai Stevenson

Dr. King makes a statement following the death of Adlai Stevenson.

MLK: New Year Hopes

In this draft of an article for the New York Amsterdam News for January 5, 1963, Dr. King refers to the near-disaster of the Cuban missile crisis and says it?s time for the nation to work on agreements on nuclear testing and disarmament and its United Nations goals. Domestic issues that demand attention are education, medical care for the aged and new civil rights legislation.

Mobilizer: February 1967

This February 1967 issue of the "Mobilizer: To End Mass Murder in Vietnam" focuses on James Bevel's direct action anti-war demonstrations. As National Director of the Spring Mobilization Committee to End the War in Vietnam, Bevel outlines his strategy to launch a national movement involving community churches, students, labor groups, and others. The initiative is designed around a march to be held on April 15, 1967 in San Francisco and New York.

Negotiation Now New York Times Advertisement

Negotiation Now, a national pro-American group opposing the war in Vietnam, planned to publish this article as an advertisement in the New York Times. Clark Herr, Reverend John J. Dougherty, Dr. Daniel Patrick Moynihan, and Seymour Martin Lipset send this letter, along with an enclosed draft of the piece, explaining that its publishing has been delayed so it can be updated in the ever changing circumstances in Vietnam. The article addresses the concerns of the movement and urges people to call their representatives.

New Left Versus Old Liberals in Battle for Dr. King's Soul

Conservative syndicated columnists Rowland Evans and Robert Novak claim that Dr. King's soul is being challenged by various factions with whom he has associated. Evans and Novak question Dr. King's relationship with Stokely Carmichael by reminding him of his promise never to work with Mr. Carmichael again.

Newsweek: Road to Selma - Hope & Death

Newsweek issues this synopsis of the 1965 voting rights march from Selma to Montgomery. The article illustrates the details surrounding the brutal racial murder of Viola Liuzzo, delving into the federal investigation of Mrs. Liuzzo's murder and its impact on the future passage of the pending 1965 Voting Rights Act.

Next Steps In The South

The Southern Regional Council publishes a pamphlet that addresses the landmark Brown vs. Board of Education Supreme Court Case and what its implications mean for society. The pamphlet goes on to answer several questions concerning school integration and gives background information on the case and the issues of segregation.

People to People: The Negro Looks at Africa

In his column in the New York Amsterdam News, Dr. King reports on the American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa that brought together a cross-section of the Negro community to discuss foreign policy toward Africa. He writes that colonialism and segregation are siblings and that the future of the emerging nations of Africa and the American Negro are interrelated. He speaks of the contradictions in policy toward Africa, the need for more Negroes in the diplomatic corps, and the importance of action by the Administration against racism at home and racism in US foreign policy.

Proposed Resolution on East-West Relations

The Council for Christian Social Action of the United Church of Christ, citing President Johnson's State of the Union statement that he hopes to end the Cold War, indicates its support of government efforts to create a dialogue with the Soviet Union and other Eastern European countries. The Council asks that the Senate ratify the outer space treaty and the U.S.-Soviet consular convention and that Congress approve an East-West trade bill and lifting restrictions on the Food for Peace program.

Protest Against MLK Flyer

This flyer accuses Dr. King of being a traitor and calls for a protest rally when he appears at Grosse Pointe High School in Detroit

Race Role Urged For Girl Scouts

De. Harold Taylor, former president of Sarah Lawrence College, challenges the Girl Scouts of America to play a greater role in fighting racism in the South. He also suggest that the Girl Scouts work with the Peace Corps to help spread their teachings internationally.

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