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United Nations

Associated Archive Content : 154 results

Invitation from Aubrey T. Edwards to MLK

Aubrey T. Edward, President of the Oakville Branch for the United Nations Association in Canada, invites Dr. King to make an address during the organizations designated Human Rights year.

Invitation from J.E.L Graham to MLK

J.E.L. Graham, President of the Hamilton Branch of the United Nations Association in Canada, invites Dr. King to speak on the theme of Human Rights during one of the organizations quarterly meetings.

Invitation from Mr. and Mrs. Ralph J. Bunche to Dr. and Mrs. MLK

Mr. and Mrs. Ralph J. Bunche invite Dr. and Mrs. King to an informal dinner in the Kew Gardens neighborhood of Queens, New York.

Invitation from Nuhu Bamali to Dr. and Mrs. King

Dr. and Mrs. King receive an invitation to a reception from the Chairman of the Nigerian Delegation to the Twentieth Session of the General Assembly and Deputy Foreign Minister.

Invitation from the United Nations to Mr. and Mrs. Popper

The United Nations Representatives for the United States of America and Norway invite Mr. and Mrs. Popper to attend an event in honor of Dr. King.

Invitation to MLK from London Methodist Youth Organization

Greater London Youth and Community Service invites Dr. King to participate in a London to Canterbury Pilgrimage by leading a study on human rights and the church and preaching a sermon.

Invitation to the 118th Anniversary of Liberian Independence to Dr. and Mrs. King

The Permanent Representative of Liberia to the United Nations, Milton Nathaniel Barnes, invites Dr. and Mrs. King to attend a celebration of the 118th Anniversary of Liberia's independence. The reception was held in New York in July, 1965.

King Finds New Target

This article from The Topeka Daily Capital discusses Dr. King's stance on the Vietnam War. Dr. King verbalizes his stance after seeing anti-poverty funds being used for war. The article also mentions civil rights leaders who are against joining both causes for civil rights and world peace.

Legal Petition Made by Karl Von Key Against Selective Service System

Karl Von Key petitions the United States District Court of California about his draft into the armed forces. He contends that, as a person of color, he is a colonial subject, not a citizen of the United States. As a colonial subject, he should not be forced to serve in the military. He also writes that he is a conscientious objector and that he believes he was targeted by the local induction station because of his social and political views.

Letter from A. Martin to MLK

A. Martin expresses his support for Dr. King's work, but advises Dr. King not to run for President. Martin also shares his thoughts about which candidates he considers best suited for the role of President.

Letter from Adlai E. Stevenson to MLK

US Ambassador to the United Nations Adlai Stevenson, informs Dr. King that they will have to postpone their meeting due to a U.N. Security Council meeting that Mr. Stevenson has to preside over.

Letter from Alan Sapiro to MLK

Alan Sapiro, Public Relations Officer of Bankers Trust Company, writes Dr. King enclosing a letter he wrote to the New York Times that contains comments the Reverend made during a Peace Rally press conference at the United Nations.

Letter from Archie Crouch to MLK

Archie R. Crouch, of the Office for Communications, sends a personal letter to Dr. King using the United Presbyterian Church letterhead. He expresses his support for Dr. King's leadership against the Vietnam War and states that he meets many people that stand in opposition to the war. Crouch encloses recent issues of the publications New and Motive, which highlight the anti-war efforts taking place in the Presbyterian Church.

Letter from Audrey Mizer to MLK

Audrey Mizer encourages Dr. King to continue his good works because "the world cannot be robbed of any good." Mizer then discusses her opposing views to a statement in a Christian Monitor Column regarding Red China's admission to the United Nations.

Letter from Benjamin F. Smith to the Editor of Detroit Free Press

In a letter to the editor of the Detroit Free Press, Benjamin Smith criticizes US involvement in Vietnam. He advocates ending the war as 80% of South Vietnamese people want peace, while 67% of Americans "favor a rough war."

Letter from Canadian Friend's Service Committee to MLK

Murray Thomson invites Dr. King to attend an annual conference of world diplomats in Ontario, Canada. Some of the major topics of discussion include the future of military alliances, the growing role of the United Nations, and preventing the spread of nuclear weapons.

Letter from Captain Leonard Larsen to MLK

Captain Leonard Larsen writes Dr. King and attaches a copy of President John F. Kennedy's "Final Plea" regarding his sentiments about the Vietnam War. Larsen hopes to enhance and promote progress towards Dr. King's anti-war campaign.

Letter from CB Gilless to MLK

Mr. Gilless writes to Dr. King concerning a proposed petition to establish a 'World Government'. He beckons "Just how much better than the American free public do you think the world government will be?" He requests an immediate rebuttal.

Letter from Claude Leman to MLK

Claude Leman, Chairman of the University Model United Nations, invites Dr. King to speak at a Model United Nations Seminar in Montreal, Canada.

Letter from Dave Dellinger to MLK

Dave Dellinger outlines the events and requirements for the rally, sponsored by the Spring Mobilization Committee to End the War in Vietnam, to be held in New York City, New York on April 15th, 1967.

Letter from Devi Prasad to MLK

Devi Prasad, the General Secretary of War Resisters' International, wrote Dr. King to inform him of a leaflet to be published and distributed. The leaflet contained information about the Declaration of Human Rights. Enclosed in the letter is an example of the leaflet.

Letter from Dr. William G. Anderson to MLK

Dr. William G. Anderson accepts Dr. King's invitation to join the Board of Directors of the SCLC for a three year period.

Letter from Franklin H. Williams to MLK

Ambassador Williams congratulates Dr. King on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize and invites him to a United Nations reception.

Letter from Harry Belafonte to MLK

Harry Belafonte outlines the details of the African Program to Dr. King. The document references King's future delegation to several African countries and emphasizes the "Afro-American Banking Proposal" as a topic of interest.

Letter from Harry Wachtel to Premier Kosygin and President Johnson

Civil rights activist Harry Wachtel tells Soviet Premier Kosygin and President Lyndon Johnson that the world community depends on their solutions to crucial problems. He charges President Johnson with ending bombing in Vietnam and he charges Premier Kosygin with influencing Vietnam towards peaceful negotiations. Lastly, he asks both leaders to help eliminate war and poverty in the Middle East.

Letter from Imogene Cashmore to President Johnson

Imogene Cashmore responds to Senator Dodd's recent statement in Congress about Moise Tshombe, a Congo politician who had recently been jailed on charges of treason. Cashmore condemns Senators Robert and Ted Kennedy for not trying to help Tshombe, questioning why there has been no negative response to the current government of Congo, which Cashmore charges is rampant with "mass murder and violation of civil rights."

Letter from Ira Edmond Gillet to MLK

Mr. Gillet, a member of the Fellowship of Reconciliation and former missionary in South Africa, sends Dr. King his thoughts on a recent petition circulated by the American Committee on Africa. He explains that the actions called for in the petition would "do more harm than good." Gillet encloses a copy of the petition, highlighted with his own comments, which implores President Kennedy to impose sanctions on South Africa.

Letter from Jacques Muhlethaler to MLK

The EIP, an association which seeks to establish the greatest number of schools in the world, asks Dr. King to become a member of their Board of Patrons.

Letter from James Farmer to MLK

Chairman J. Farmer gives Dr. King a report from the National Advisory Committee of CORE.

Letter from James L. Hicklin, III to MLK

James Lewis Hicklin, III of The Freedom For All Foundation, inquires if Dr. King will serve on the organization's National Board of Governors.

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