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Sin

Associated Archive Content : 89 results

Sin

Dr. King writes on sin as described in Jeremiah 4:22.

Sin

Dr. King writes about sin, according to Jeremiah 5:4.

Sin

Dr. King quotes theologian Reinhold Niebuhr on his perception of sin. Niebuhr discusses the creativity and uniqueness of man with his relation to God.

Sin

Dr. King cites a scripture from the "Book of Isaiah" referencing the universality of sin.

Sin

Dr. King offers two possible interpretations of Psalms 53:1.

Sin

Dr. King quotes two verses from the book of Leviticus.

Sin

Dr. King writes that Isaiah 1:18-20 indicates that sacrifices are not needed to be saved from sin; willingness and obedience are the way to be saved.

Sin

Dr. King writes about sin, according to Jeremiah 31: 29, 30.

Sin

Dr. King paraphrases a scripture from the book of Leviticus that pertains to sin.

Sin

Dr. King cites a scripture from the Old Testament biblical Book of Leviticus regarding the transformation of sin.

Sin

Dr. King paraphrases the teachings of Amos about sin. Dr. King writes that Amos condemns Israel for the sins of bribery, oppression of the poor by the rich, sexual immorality and the "self-indulgent use of what has been wrung from the helpless."

Sin

Dr. King explains the relationship between punishment and sin by referencing the biblical verse, I Chronicles 21:17.

Sin

Dr. King references the biblical book of Numbers regarding the topic of sin.

Sin

Dr. King provides insight on the "secret of sin."

Sin

Dr. King notes that I Chronicles 21:1 says that Satan ordered David to conduct a census but that another account indicates it was the Lord. He questions why it was regarded as sinful to take a census.

Sin

Dr. King compares the understanding of several philosophers on the subject of sin.

Sin

Dr. King notes that Genesis 5:24, 6:9 and 6:22 make it clear that sin is not universal.

Sin

Dr. King notes that in Ezekiel 18, the prophet establishes himself as the father of individualism, unlike his predecessors who focused primarily upon the nation.

Sin (Augustine's definition)

Dr. King records a note on St. Augustine's definition sin, referencing passages from Reinhold Niebuhr's "The Nature and Destiny of Man: A Christian Interpretation," volume 1: "Human Nature."

Sin (Definition)

Dr. King quotes Henry Nelson Wieman’s “Normative Psychology of Religion.”

Sin (Isaiah)

Dr. King highlights the topic of sin, according to the Book of Isaiah.

Sin I and Sin II

Dr. King cites scripture in examining concepts of sin.

Sin in Psalms

Dr. King writes notes on the topic of sin, quoting Psalm 51:5.

The Dilemma of White America

This early draft of the Racism and the White Backlash chapter of Dr. King's Where Do We Go from Here: Chaos or Community? explores the history and philosophy of white supremacy. King insists the current status of Negroes is the direct result of oppression by whites, who have developed delusional beliefs to justify their historic acts of colonization and slavery.

The Secular in Relation to the Holy

Dr. King quotes theologian and philosopher Paul Tillich's "Systematic Theology." Dr. King's doctoral degree is in systematic theology from Boston University and his dissertation is on Paul Tillich. According to Tillich, secular and holy correlate and cannot act separately. Tillich states, "The holy embraces itself and the secular."

Trent, Canons and Decrees of the Council of

Dr. King records some thoughts on the Decrees of the Council of Trent regarding the Catholic Church's response to the Protestant Reformation.

We Would See Jesus

Dr. King gives this sermon to a congregation at Ebenezer Baptist Church. He conveys a message of Christ's acceptance of all despite any person's wrong doings in the past. He also points out that Christ's work is exemplified through individual acts of kindness and helping others.

What Is Man?

This excerpt from Dr. King's book entitled "The Measure of Man" defines the physical and spiritual doctrines of Man. The passage highlights the sinful nature of human beings.

Who Are We?

In this sermon Dr. King contemplates "who are we?" and "what is man?". He differentiates between the pessimistic attitudes of the materialistic understandings of man and the optimistic attitudes of humanistic definitions of man. King also states that man is neither all good nor all bad, but a combination. Man is both an everlasting miracle and mystery.

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