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Freedom Songs

Associated Archive Content : 28 results

Anonymous Letter to MLK

An anonymous supporter sends an encouraging letter to Dr. King.

Black Power and the American Christ

The Christian Century published this article by historian and civil rights activist Vincent Harding in its June 4, 1967 issue. In the essay, Harding, friend, associate, and speech writer for Dr. King, claims that Eurocentric Christianity antagonized the Black Power Movement.

Freedom!: A Spiritual Inspiration

Composer Kenneth A. Roane wrote the song "Freedom," which he dedicated to the fight for civil rights.

Letter from an Asylum Inmate to MLK Seeking Assistance

Paul Douglas Ware, an untried inmate, requests Dr. King's "understanding, moral support, and possible assistance." Mr. Ware informs Dr. King of detailed information regarding his unjust treatment, his personal life, his present state of mind and most importantly his desire to have a stronger bond with "his own people."

Letter from Carmen Baptista to MLK

Carmen Baptista of Caracas, Venezuela writes Dr. King after reading his letter in the Saturday Review. She expresses her concern with the struggle for civil rights and since she is unable to make a monetary donation, she sends Dr. King a recording of a song she composed in honor of the freedom workers called "Coming Down the Road."

Letter from Jean L. Bennett to Dora McDonald

Ms. Jean L. Bennett writes to Ms. McDonald regarding the Platters recording of the song "We Ain't What We Was." She believes that the SCLC should adopt this song as an actual theme song for it was inspired by Dr. King. The Platters were a successful vocal group during this time.

Letter from Lonnie MacDonald to MLK

Lonnie MacDonald, a friend of the King family, encloses a song that she has written for Dr. King. She writes that the song was inspired by his commitment to freedom as reflected by his recent actions in Birmingham, Alabama.

Letter from Miss Shirley Wright to Mrs. King

Mrs. King writes Shirley Wright of the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee, thanking her for the copy of the "We Shall Overcome" record.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Shapiro

Dr. King expresses his appreciation for Mr. Shapiro's song, "The Most Important People." Dr. King states that the song is an "admirable contribution to the furtherance of the Freedom Movement."

Letter from MLK to Ray Stewart

Dr. King thanks Ray Stewart for a song written in tribute to the Freedom Movement, but states that neither he nor the SCLC can underwrite the requested fee for use of the song.

MLK Address on Racial Injustice, Poverty, and War

Dr. King addresses the French community during his "Racial Injustice, Poverty, and War" speech. He discusses topics such as poverty, politics, war, and the government.

MLK Speech at SCLC Staff Retreat

Dr. King addresses the staff of the SCLC at a retreat in Frogmore, South Carolina. He divides his speech into three parts: "whence we have come, where we have come, and where do we go from here." Dr. King thoroughly discusses his thoughts on Communism, the practice of nonviolence, the belief that racism is an "ontological affirmation,"and the weaknesses of Black Power.

MSGR. Victor G. Moser's Statements Relating to Selma-Montgomery March

Victor G. Moser recounts the activities that took place during the march on Montgomery ,which was one of a serious, dedicated, even religious commitment to a project which would really bring out the serious injustice being perpetrated upon a persecuted and disadvantaged people.

New York Times: The Case Against Tokenism

In this article for the New York Times, Dr. King writes of his experiences in an Albany, GA jail. Furthermore, he submits the idea that a delayed response to integration and equality for all is no longer acceptable due to the Negro having a "new sense of somebodiness."

Nobel Lecture by MLK

This is a copy of the Lecture given by Dr. King in Oslo, Norway upon his winning the 1964 Nobel Peace Prize. He thanks the Norwegian Parliament for honoring him with this award. He speaks of the evils of racially injustice and the belief that "oppressed people cannot remain oppressed forever." He speaks of the need to peacefully come together in harmony as humanity because a peaceful world cannot be built based on a "negative path."

Nobel Peace Prize Lecture

In this lecture delivered the day after he received the Nobel Peace Prize, Dr. King describes the major evils of the world as racial injustice, poverty and war. He presents a vision of a World House in which people learn to transcend differences in race, culture, ideas and religion and learn to live together in peace.

Ode to Freedom

"Ode to Freedom" is a list of declarations used to inspire and uplift those involved in the movement.

Public Meeting Program Agenda

This document outlines the participants of a two-day public meeting beginning on September 26, 1962. Reverend Fred Shuttlesworth presides over the meeting in which the "Rosa Parks Freedom Award" is presented by Rosa Parks and Adam Clayton Powell.

Refinement by Fire

R. Elizabeth Johns describes the events surrounding voter registration in the South and tactics used by civil rights and opposition leaders.

Remaining Awake Through a Great Revolution

Dr. King delivers the commencement address at Oberlin College in Ohio on June 14, 1965. Nothing is more tragic, he says, than sleeping through a significant period of social change by failing to adopt the new mental attitudes that the new situation demands. He suggests that to remain awake through a great revolution one must embrace a global perspective and work for peace, racial justice, economic justice and brotherhood throughout the world.

Saturday Review: Behind the Selma March

Dr. King describes the events surrounding the Selma-Montgomery Civil Rights March of 1965.

SCLC Newsletter: August 1963

This is volume one of the SCLC Newsletter, printed for the month and year of August 1963. Several topics are covered including; the March on Washington, Rebuilding Bombed Churches, the WCLC, and Negro voting registration.

SCLC Newsletter: March 1964

The March, 1964 SCLC newsletter reports many news items, including a voter registration drive in Alabama, the results of several legal cases, the Civil Rights Act of 1964, an article criticizing Judge Durwood T. Pye and the use of interracial primers in Detroit's public schools.

SCLC Newsletter: October 1963

This document contains the SCLC's newletter for October 1963. The articles featured in the newsletter include: SCLC's recent accomplishments, details of the Sixteen Street Baptist Church bombing, the seventh annual SCLC convention, data regarding employment for Negroes in Alabama, and gains made in St. Augustine, Florida. Also featured are numerous photographs of Dr. King and notable Civil Rights leaders.

SCLC: Tenth Annual Convention

This program denotes the key leaders for the Tenth Annual Convention of the SCLC held in Jackson, Mississippi. It also outlines the timeline of events for the four-day convention, noting a foreword written by Dr. King.

Stars for Freedom 1967

This magazine highlights celebrities who have contributed to the Civil Rights Movement as well as the contributions of SCLC and other programs across America. Featured in the article is statement by SCLC President, Dr. King.

The Deep South in Social Revolution

The Deep South in Social Revolution was the theme for the 1961 SCLC Annual Meeting.

The Story of Snick

"From Freedom High to Black Power," by Gene Roberts, describes the opposing views voiced by SNCC and Dr. King regarding the civil rights movement. SNCC asserts a message of violence and black power, while Dr. King promotes a philosophy of love and nonviolence.