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Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (U.S.)

Founded in April 1960 at Shaw University by Ella Baker and student activists, the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) began with a series of sit-ins in Raleigh, North Carolina, inspired by similar actions in Greensboro. Marion Barry was SNCC’s first chairman. The Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) provided SNCC with an $80,000 grant, but the two groups were often in conflict. SNCC participated in the Freedom Rides, voter registration and efforts to desegregate public facilities. In 1963, SNCC chairman John Lewis spoke at the March on Washington. At the time of the 1965 Selma marches, the ideological split within SNCC intensified. In May 1966, Stokely Carmichael assumed leadership and steered the organization away from its commitment to nonviolence and racial inclusion. SNCC became an engine of the Black Power movement. With Carmichael’s departure and the rise of the Black Panther Party, SNCC declined in membership, finances and activity by the end of the decade.

Associated Archive Content : 171 results

Financial Report of the SCLC

This is the SCLC financial report for the week of March 4 through March 8, 1968. Income, disbursements, and bank balances from several banks are included in this document. Expenses from organizational projects, such as Voter Registration, the Washington Project and Operation Breadbasket, are also documented. A list of priorities and outstanding debts conclude the report.

Findings and Recommendation Committee

This is a recommendation to establish a temporary coordinating committee in Atlanta, GA to deal particularly in the areas of finance and communication.

H. Rap Brown Requests SNCC Support

The Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee's New York office of International Affairs, requests support during the August 27, 1967 boycott of General Motors. After declaring itself a Human Rights organization, SNCC requests support in the worldwide struggle for human rights, especially black liberation schools in the United States.

Helping Across the South

Operation Freedom is an organization that originally began in west Tennessee to aid African Americans that were wrongly evicted from their homes due to the white power structure. The committees of Operation Freedom have expanded to other southern states where their help is needed.

Interview about Refusal to Seat Julian Bond

This is transcript of a question and answer period following a news conference at which Dr. King made a statement regarding the Georgia State Legislature's refusal to seat Julian Bond after Bond announced his support of a Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) news release opposing the Vietnam War. King led a protest rally to the state house.

Introduction to an Educational Program on Nonviolence

This document explains the purpose of an educational program on nonviolence. The document then goes into specific details on the curriculum taught in the workshops for nonviolence.

Jo Marks writes Harry Belafonte Regarding Civil Rights Help

Jo Marks writes Mr. Harry Belafonte a lengthy letter about the civil rights situation in Houston and to request that he perform at the Astrodome.

Joint Statement of MLK and SCLC

Dr. King and John Lewis deliver a statement concerning a meeting presided over by Harry Belafonte. The meeting was intended to discover ways that the SCLC and SNCC could cooperate and concluded with an agreement for both organizations to work together but separately towards a voting bill and other goals.

Letter from a Fellow American to MLK

This anonymous author expresses his concern regarding SNCC; explaining that the organization and its leaders have a communist backing. The author closes the letter with references to jobs, education, and a list of several small countries in need of assistance.

Letter from Adie Marks to Harry Belafonte

Adie Marks writes Harry Belafonte in an effort to organize an event consisting of several artists and organizations to combat issues African Americans face in America.

Letter from Alfred Gunn to MLK

Alfred L. Gunn requests Dr King's support of Gunn's "new Democratic way of Philosophy." Mr. Dunn also encloses three manuscripts pertaining to riots, the American gun and rifle laws, and the occurrence of racial problems in America.

Letter From Andrew Young to Julian Bond

Mr. Young expresses his appreciation for Mr. Bond, a founding member of SNCC, social activist, and politician in the state of Georgia. He urges Mr. Bond to continue the fight for racial equality despite major adversities.

Letter from Benjamin E. Smith to MLK

This report highlights a Birmingham conference on the "Ways and Means to Integrate the Deep South" sponsored by the Southern Conference Educational Fund, Inc. This conference included several hundred white and black leaders who sought to integrate the South.

Letter from Charles Sherrod to Friends of SNCC

Field Secretary Charles Sherrod invites friends of the SNCC to an emergency meeting to outline the direction of the student and Civil Rights Movement. The meeting is to be held at the Highlander Folk School in Tennessee which serves as a training ground for nonviolence and civil rights activities.

Letter from Clarence Jones to MLK

This letter announces that the Gandhi Society for Human Rights, Incorporated is sponsoring a benefit concert, for the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee, at Carnegie Hal,l in New York City. Harry Belafonte, Frank Sinatra and Lena Horne are listed as some of the spotlight performers for this concert.

Letter from Courtland Cox to MLK

Courtland Cox of SNCC writes Dr. King reminding him that several of their members are away in Africa and informs him that Mr. Lewis will not be able to attend his convention.

Letter from Dan H. Elkind to MLK

Mr. Elkind discusses recent actions of the SNCC and the SCLC's plans for a massive civil disobedience campaign. He believes that the actions made by the SNCC will lead to violence and also "alienate" supporters of civil rights legislation. He views Dr. King's plans for a massive civil disobedience campaign to be unlawful, and therefore suggests a different approach for Dr. King to take.

Letter from David L. Clark and Charles E. Young to MLK

David Clark and Charles E. Young of the University of California Los Angeles write to Dr. King to ask him to speak to the UCLA student body. They express that their students are very interested in the Civil Rights Movement and have planned an entire "Selma Week" to correspond with his speech and raise money for the Selma Movement.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Silas Norman of SNCC

Dora McDonald writes Silas Norman of SNCC to explain that Dr. King is currently touring several cities on the People-to-People tour and will be presiding over the SCLC convention. She informs him that his letter will be brought to Dr. King's attention upon his return.

Letter from Durand R. Kinloch to MLK

Supporter Durand Kinloch describes himself as "an average white graduate student" with two children who wants to continue to support Dr. King's fight for civil rights. He stresses that love and nonviolence are needed more than ever as he witnesses a resurgence of hate in 1967.

Letter from Elijah Muhammad to MLK

In this letter, Elijah Muhammad expresses the importance of black unity in the efforts for equality. Elijah Muhammad requests the presence of Dr. King and other prominent civil rights leaders at a meeting to discuss solutions to the ongoing struggle against injustice.

Letter from Evelyn Rawley to Billy Mills

Evelyn E. Rawley writes Billy Mills, chairman of the Democratic County Central Committee, to express distaste for Mills' choice of colleagues, political activity, and lack of reason. Rawley affirms that Mill's irresponsible actions are an obstacle to democratic practices.

Letter from Franklin I. Gamwell with Enclosed Copy of the Interracial News Service Newsletter

Franklin I. Gamwell, of the Student Interracial Ministry, requests if Dr. King would like to have an intern student at Ebenezer Baptist Church for 1963.
Interracial News Service describes the experiences of many Student Interracial Ministry participants and the pastors of the churches they spent the summers with.

Letter from Friends of the SNCC to MLK

Richard Meier and Lowell Bergman request Dr. King's support for a letter-writing campaign directed at members of the Wisconsin State Senate and Assembly.

Letter from Harold Eggers to MLK

In this letter Harold Eggers, a White supremacist, criticizes the African American race, for what Eggers perceives as an inability to recognize "real leadership ability." However, he does this while commending Dr. King for possessing "real leadership ability."

Letter from Harry Belafonte to MLK

Harry Belafonte outlines the details of the African Program to Dr. King. The document references King's future delegation to several African countries and emphasizes the "Afro-American Banking Proposal" as a topic of interest.

Letter from Harry Fleischman to MLK

Harry Fleischman suggests a text that may be of interest to Dr. King, entitled "We Are Not Summer Patriots." The text highlights anti-Semitism and other efforts to attain equality.

Letter from Jeanne Whitaker to MLK

Jeanne Whitaker does not oppose the slogan "Black Power", however she identifies the distinction between power and violence. Mrs. Whitaker elaborates on the influence of non-violence that was rooted from Mahatma Gandhi's methodology and practice.

Letter From Jim Letherer Regarding Proposed March

In this letter Letherer suggests a March on Christmas Eve or Easter Sunday while expressing his continued support and participation in S.N.C.C.

Letter from John and Enid Howarth to Friends Soliciting Financial Support

Mr. and Mrs. Howarth of New Mexico express their disapproval of violence against Negroes in the South and request donations for a Fourth of July celebration in support of SCLC, SNCC and other civil rights groups.

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