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African American History

Associated Archive Content : 126 results

Letter from an Asylum Inmate to MLK Seeking Assistance

Paul Douglas Ware, an untried inmate, requests Dr. King's "understanding, moral support, and possible assistance." Mr. Ware informs Dr. King of detailed information regarding his unjust treatment, his personal life, his present state of mind and most importantly his desire to have a stronger bond with "his own people."

Letter from Annie L. Cook to MLK

Annie Cook asks Dr. King to make a speech at a program sponsored by the Greenbrier County branch of the NAACP. She predicts that the program will be informative and improve communication between Negros and whites.

Letter from Arthur James to MLK

Arthur James, a member of the Movement for the Advancement of Black Brotherhood and Culture, invites Dr. King to speak at Lincoln University.

Letter from Barbara Hannagan to MLK

Barbara Hannagan, a student at Gridley Union High School in California, requests information from Dr. King to assist her with a term paper. She expresses her interest in the history of Negroes in America and how that correlates to the current issues of Negroes in "white society."

Letter from Benjamin Brown to MLK

Benjamin Brown, literary editor for CORE, thanks Dr. King for his previous letter regarding the "CORE Guide" publication. Brown asks that CORE be granted permission to reprint copies of Dr. King's past speeches.

Letter from Bruce Macdonald to MLK

Brice Macdonald, a writer for Canada's national newspaper "The Globe and Mail," informs Dr. King that he will be travelling to the South to see how it is developing. Macdonald inquires if he can converse with Dr. King or any of his employees who are well informed on the situation in Southern regions.

Letter from Charles W. Lockyer to MLK

Charles Lockyer sends Dr. King a special limited edition of the International Library of Negro Life and History as a gift. Lockyer explains that the book series is a collaboration between his publishing company and the Association for Study of Negro Life and History.

Letter from CORE to MLK

The Kansas City, Missouri Chapter of CORE writes to Dr. King inviting him to attend their Negro History Week program.

Letter from Diane McFadden to MLK

Diana McFadden requests information from Dr. King regarding his most significant personal characteristic.

Letter from E. F. S. Davies to MLK

E. F. S. Davies, Head of the Department of Philosophy at Virginia State College, writes Dr. King regarding A. J. Muste's civil rights efforts in the 1930's and 1940's.

Letter from Edmund W. Gordon to MLK

Edmund W. Gordon, Professor and Chairman of the Department of Educational Psychology and Guidance at Yeshiva University, invites Dr. King to serve on the Dr. W.E.B. DuBois memorial committee. The committee proposes a memorial park to honor Dr. DuBois in his hometown of Great Barrington, Massachusetts.

Letter from George W. Jones to MLK

George W. Jones, of the National Education Association, invites Dr. King to be the keynote speaker at an event honoring Negro History Week in Washington, DC.

Letter from Jerome S. Ozer to MLK

Mr. Ozer informs Dr. King that his organization will be publishing "Eyewitness: The Negro in American History" by William Loren Katz, which covers the Negro in every aspect of American life. He then requests that Dr. King write an introduction for the book.

Letter from John Moody

Mr. Moody discusses his hopes of creating an event that will demonstrate the phenomenon of Harumbe, with hopes of it becoming a National holiday. The proposed name of this day is "Harumbe", a Swahili term meaning Let's Get Together. Moody suggests May 19, the birthday of Malcolm X, as the date for this event to occur. Additionally, Moody provides an outline for the festivities, and requests that Dr. King contribute his suggestions after reviewing the proposal.

Letter from Larry Oaks to SCLC

A student from the University of Alabama requests information from the SCLC for a course on race relations.

Letter from Leonard Chadwick to MLK

Chadwick, a student at Lincoln school of Berkeley, California, offers encouragement to Dr. King and his continuous efforts for social good.

Letter from Lia Bosonetto to MLK Regarding Langston Hughes

Lia Bosonetto, a college student in Italy, writes Dr. King requesting information on Langston Hughes for her thesis.

Letter from Linda Robinson to MLK

Linda Robinson, a sixth grade student at Lincoln School in California, writes Dr. King expressing her admiration towards him for his work with the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Martha Johnson to MLK

Martha Johnson invites Dr. King to be a member of the John Brown Memorial Association, which is dedicated to the memory of its first freedom rider.

Letter from Michael Williams to MLK

The Chairman of the Society of African and Afro-American Students, at the University of Pennsylvania, extends an invitation to Dr. King to come speak with students during "Black Week."

Letter from MLK to Mr. & Mrs. Charles Digioia

Dr. King expresses his sincere gratitude for the sculpture of John Henry that was created and sent to him by Mr. & Mrs. Digioia. As intended by the artist, the art work embodies the magnificence of strength and courage held with in the oppressed. Honored to accept it, Dr. King sees John Henry as an inspirational symbol of will and spirit.

Letter From Otis Roberts to MLK

Otis Roberts, a Grants Officer for the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, asks that Dr. King send him a signed copy of the enclosed Grant Award for SCLSC's Basic Adult Education Project for Urban Negroes.

Letter from Rev. Milton Reid to MLK

Rev. Milton Reid invites Dr. King to Petersburg, Virginia to be the speaker at the 190th Anniversary of the First Baptist Church. Rev. Reid mentions to Dr. King that the church holds historical significance because meetings about abolishing slavery were held at the church by Nat Turner and John Brown. Reid asks Dr. King to suggest another speaker if he is unable to accept the invitation.

Letter from Ruth A. Salinger to MLK

Salinger requests that Dr. King provide contact information for civil rights leaders along the route of a scheduled trip to study race relations to be taken by high school students from the church communities of Concord, Massachusetts.

Letter from Sixth Grader to MLK

Kathy Brewster, an African American sixth grade student from Lincoln School in California, writes Dr. King expressing gratitude towards Dr. King for helping the Negro race.

Letter from SNCC's Judy Richardson to Coretta Scott King

Judy Richardson of SNCC writes to Mrs. King to give her a copy of the new Negro history primer, "Negroes in American History." The book serves as a method of teaching children about African American history while tying in elements of the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Stephen Holden to MLK

Stephen Holden, staff editor for the American Peoples Encyclopedia, wrote this letter to Dr. King to request an article for inclusion in the publication's 1968 edition.

Letter from the American Broadcasting Company to MLK

Kay Murphy, Manager of ABC's Literary Rights Division, thanks Dr. King for giving permission to the television network to quote from "Letter from Birmingham Jail" on the program "Directions '64." She also provides information about the specific program, which is a religious series focusing on "the current Negro crisis in America."

Letter from the Jerusalem Missionary Baptist Church to MLK

The Jerusalem Missionary Baptist Church regrets Dr. King's inability to attend their engagement. The church then requests Dr. King's appearance as the guest speaker for their annual Negro History Obeservance event the following year.

Letter from the Seventh Grade Class of Woodward School to MLK

Anita Davis, Gail Williams, and Joan Rockwell request an interview with Dr. King for their class project.

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