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Voting Rights Act, 1965

Associated Archive Content : 87 results

Letter from MLK to Mrs. G. Baker

Dr. King thanks Mrs. Baker, President of the Bethune Art and Study Club, for her monetary contribution to the SCLC. King explains that each contribution is necessary for the SCLC to fulfill all its tasks.

Letter from MLK to Sharon Brealer

Dr. King expresses his gratitude to Sharon Brealer for her contribution to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Letter from MLK to Spilman

Dr. King expresses gratitude to Mr. and Mrs. Spilman for their monetary contribution to the SCLC. He acknowledges how such funds have been allocated to combat the civil injustices faced by Negroes in America. He concludes by addressing the future social and political agendas of the SCLC.

Letter from Patrick V. McNamara to MLK

Pat McNamara, U.S. Senator from Michigan, writes Dr. King expressing gratitude for his letter of recent date regarding efforts to strip the poll tax prohibition from the voting rights bill.

Letter from Paul H. Douglas to MLK

Senator Paul Douglas informs Dr. King that he agrees with him about keeping the poll tax amendment and defeating the 60 percent amendment in the 1965 Voting Rights Act.

Letter from President Johnson to MLK on Voting Rights

President Johnson offers his gratitude to Dr. King for supporting his advocacy before Congress of legislation guaranteeing universal voting rights.

Letter from Representative Carl Perkins to MLK

Congressman Carl Perkins informs Dr. King that he supports fighting against the McCulloch Amendment to the Voting Rights Act of 1965.

Letter from Senator Clifford P. Case to MLK Regarding Poll Taxes as a Condition to Vote

New Jersey Senator Clifford Case informs Dr. King that he feels strongly about the elimination of poll taxes as a condition to vote, and he will do his best to push through a provision abolishing these taxes.

Letter from Vince Hartke to MLK

Democratic Indiana Senator Vance Hartke informs Dr. King that the Senate might not vote on the issue of the Voting Rights Bill due to a recent decision concerning the constitutionality of a poll tax.

Letter from William T. Murphy to MLK

Mr. Murphy, a representative of the United States Congress, writes to Dr. King to convey his intentions to support the House of Judiciary Committee Voting Rights bill.

Memo from Clarence Jones to MLK

Clarence Jones sends Dr. King an article regarding the increasing number of blacks being elected into local governments in the Deep South. Also included is in article informing readers that Jones has been named partner in a member firm of the New York Stock Exchange.

Memorandum from Benjamin F. Payton Regarding Meredith Mississippi March

Benjamin F. Payton, Executive Director of the Commission on Religion and Race of the National Council of Churches, constructs this document as a debriefing on the Meredith Mississippi March. It is evident that the march is symbolic of the nation's struggle with racial conflict and aims to dismantle fear among African American voter registration. James Meredith, Mississippi citizen and first African American to desegregate the University of Mississippi, had organized and led the march.

Memorandum from Ralph D. Abernathy to SCLC Board Members and Executive Staff

Rev. Ralph Abernathy informs the board members and executive staff of SCLC that Dr. King is taking a leave of absence for two months to write his book, "Where Do We Go From Here?" During Dr. King's absence, Rev. Abernathy took over the activities of the SCLC.

MLK Address - The Association of The Bar of the City of New York

Dr. King gives an address to the Association of The Bar of the City of New York at the Hilton Hotel in New York. He praises lawyers for using their knowledge to aid the Civil Rights Movement. He states that Negro lawyers bring wisdom and a determination to win to the courtroom. Dr. King also defines an unjust law as a law that is "out of harmony with moral law of the universe."

MLK Addresses the District 65 AFL-CIO

This is an address given by Dr. King to District 65 of the National AFL-CIO Convention in Miami, Beach. Dr. King recognizes their contribution to the Southern Christen Leadership Conference.

MLK Responds to Questions Pertaining to the Civil Rights Movement

Dr. King responds to a series of questions concerning such topics as his opposition to the Vietnam War, the direction of the Civil Rights Movement, urban riots in Detroit and Newark, and SCLC initiatives catered to the ghettos of the American South.

MLK Speaks on Vietnam War

This 32-page booklet was published by Clergy and Laymen Concerned About Vietnam shortly after Dr. King’s April 4, 1967 Riverside Church address on the Vietnam War. It features a foreword by Dr. Reinhold Niebuhr, Dr. King’s speech, and remarks by Henry Steele Commager, Dr. John C. Bennett, and Rabbi Abraham Heschel. In addition, it includes a New York Times interview with Dr. King, King’s response to NAACP criticism on his opposition to the war, and letters to the editor of the New York Times.

MLK's Address to Syracuse University

Dr. King, in a public speech at Howard University, talks about numerous factors that affect education in America.

Negro Leaders On "Meet the Press"

This is a transcription of the Meet the Press interview with Dr. King, Stokely Carmichael, Roy Wilkins, and other leaders representing civil rights organizations. The nationally broadcasted news segment covered many pertinent social topics including demonstrations and riots, city movements, the Vietnam War, and the progression of the Civil Rights Movement. The interview structure consisted of a panel, which prompted relevant questions, and moderator Edwin Newman.

One Vote for Every Man: Civil Rights Act

In this draft of an article for the March 1965 IUD Agenda, an AFL-CIO monthly publication, Dr. King recounts the progress made by the Civil Rights Movement and states that the issue in 1965 is the right to vote and the venue is Selma, Alabama. He discusses the pattern of exclusion, including the abuse of power by local sheriffs, illegal use of local and state laws, delay tactics of registrars, and literacy tests. He outlines measures that a Civil Rights Act of 1965 should include.

People to People: Civil Rights and Negative Normalcy

Dr. King attempts to answer questions from white liberals concerning the progress and importance of the Civil Rights Movement.

Power for the Powerless - SCLC's Basic Challenge

This report outlines the objectives of the SCLC, as well as programs and projects led by various departments. It also includes a staff listing and organizational chart.

Press Statement by MLK About President Johnson's Address on Selma

Dr. King lauds President Johnson's speech to a joint session of Congress, which he describes as an eloquent, unequivocal and passionate plea for human rights. This statement and the President's address occurred during the height of the Selma voting rights campaign.

Questions and Answers on the Civil Rights Act of 1967

This document contains questions and answers on the proposed Civil Rights Act of 1967 regarding federal and state jury trials, equal employment, fair housing, protection against interference with constitutional rights, and extending the life of the civil rights commission.

Racism Blocks Social Aid to Needy

Dr. King writes that overcoming inequality in America will require a "revolution in attitude and values." He calls for a guaranteed annual income and a Bill of Rights just for the disadvantaged.

Remaining Awake Through a Great Revolution

Dr. King delivers the commencement address at Oberlin College in Ohio on June 14, 1965. Nothing is more tragic, he says, than sleeping through a significant period of social change by failing to adopt the new mental attitudes that the new situation demands. He suggests that to remain awake through a great revolution one must embrace a global perspective and work for peace, racial justice, economic justice and brotherhood throughout the world.

Saturday Review: Behind the Selma March

Dr. King describes the events surrounding the Selma-Montgomery Civil Rights March of 1965.

SCLC Annual Report by MLK, 1965

Dr King delivered this report at the SCLC's ninth annual national convention in Birmingham, Alabama. Serving essentially as a State of the Union address for the SCLC, the report touches on the major topics of the Civil Rights Movement and the recent achievements and goals of the SCLC.

SCLC Booklet

This booklet describes the programs and actions of the SCLC. It explains why it is a movement organization as well as defining the King-Abernathy tradition.

SCLC Newsletter: October-November 1965

This SCLC newsletter depicts the courage of SCLC workers putting their lives on the line while fighting for civil rights. The newsletter also highlights pictures from SCLC's ninth annual convention in Birmingham Alabama and a children's book about Dr. King.

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