Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Vietnamese Conflict, 1961-1975

Associated Archive Content : 122 results

Letter from Edwin Allaire to MLK

The writer, who identifies himself as a professor at the University of Michigan, encourages Dr. King to announce his candidacy for the Presidency.

Letter from Edwin T. Dahlberg to Charles H. Day Regarding MLK

In this letter Mr. Dahlberg encourages Mr. Day to send Dr. King a personal invitation to appear in Des Moines, Iowa. The author also discusses the Washington March for Peace in Vietnam.

Letter from Eleanor Bell Barnard to MLK

Eleanor Bell Barnard expresses her appreciation for Dr. King's position on Vietnam and Civil Rights. Ms. Barnard also describes to Dr. King how his work is motivation to those who are unemployed.

Letter from Elisabeth Leonard to MLK

Elisabeth Leonard expresses her support and gratitude for Dr. King's work, which includes his speeches about the Vietnam War as well as an upcoming speech on the Spring Mobilization.

Letter from Everett C. McKeage to MLK

Mr. McKeage writes to Dr. King expressing his satisfaction and appreciation for his position on Vietnam relations. He encloses a monetary donation to assist Dr. King's work.

Letter from Ezra J. Evans to MLK

Mrs. Evans writes to Dr. King, suggesting to the expansion of educational conferences on the Vietnam War for the purpose of peace keeping and service.

Letter from Frank R. Romano to MLK

Frank R. Romano expresses his support for Dr. Martin Luther King Jr by explaining his run as a peace candidate in the 1966 primary.

Letter from Gerold Newmark to MLK

In this letter, Mr. Newmark requests a copy of the speech Dr. King delivered in New York City on Vietnam.

Letter from Helen Marrow to MLK

Mrs. Marrow thanks Dr. King for his leadership and position on the Vietnam War. She also encloses a special composition dedicated to Dr. King for his commitment to peace.

Letter from Howard Frazier to MLK

Mr. Frazier thanks Dr. King for his "courageous" stand on the Vietnam War. He is impressed by Dr. King's plan to organize thousands of volunteers to participate in the Peace Movement and makes a donation of $25.00 to the peace fund.

Letter from J. L. Roberts to MLK

Minister Roberts writes to Dr. King expressing his support of the Civil Rights Movement along with making a donation to the SCLC.

Letter from J. V. Jones to MLK

J.V. Jones questions whether Dr. King's position on the Vietnam war is helping the black race because he believes otherwise. Jones also encloses a Walter Winchell article from the Los Angeles Harold Examiner.

Letter from Jack Hopkins to Senator Morse

In a letter to Senator Wayne L. Morse, Jack Hopkins addresses his personal issues with the United States. He begins with a discussion of the conflict in Vietnam, and believes the United States is handling it poorly. He then expresses his feelings on the Jewish race and the establishment of a Jewish nation. He concludes his letter saying that the United States never tries to solve problems; rather it creates the foundation for a new war.

Letter from James Allen to MLK

James Allen expresses his opinion of the United States' involvement in Vietnam.

Letter from Julius Avery to MLK Regarding Vietnam

In this letter Julius H. Avery writes MLK to urge him to reconsider his position on the Vietnam war. Avery expresses his support for world peace but stresses that Dr. King's remarks are volatile and do not warrant "opening the flood gates to Communism."

Letter from K. Emmons to MLK

K. Emmons proposes to Dr. King that Christians should put God and Jesus above "fumbling politicians." K. Emmons also comments on soldiers in Vietnam.

Letter from Kent Bach to MLK

In this letter Kent Bach requests Dr. King's endorsement of "Lights On For Peace." Kent Bach plans to run a full-page ad in the New York Times expressing his objection to America's military involvement in Vietnam.

Letter from Lawrence G. Holt to MLK Regarding Civil Rights

In this Letter, Lawrence Holt writes to Dr. King urging him to limit his public comments to those regarding civil rights and not the war in Vietnam. Holt states, "You are in a unique position to help the civil rights movement which you are endangering by your public comments on the war."

Letter from Leonard Newell to MLK

Leonard A. Newell writes to Dr. King to ask for his opinion about the pursuit of a consumer strike to protest the War in Vietnam.

Letter from Lillian M. Snyder to the Editor

Lillian Snyder sends a letter to the editor of Sunpapers sharing her views on U.S. involvement in the Vietnam War.

Letter from MLK to a Former Supporter

This is an edited copy of Dr. King's response to someone withdrawing support due to his position on the Vietnam War. King's detailed rewrites show efforts to avoid further misunderstandings about his position. He applies nonviolent philosophies to both the civil rights and peace movements, however, does not attempt to link the two. Rather than asking for Negroes to be exempt from the draft as a special privilege, he believes Negroes have an intimate knowledge of the effects of violence. As such, they should have a special moral obligation not to inflict violence on others.

Letter from MLK to C. B. King

Dr. King thanks C. B. King for a recent contribution and tells him that the widespread, articulate opposition to the war in Vietnam is unprecedented in American history.

Letter from MLK to Colonel Harold C. Wall

In a letter to Colonel Harold C. Wall, Dr. King writes to appeal the Selective Service case of Thomas E. Houck Jr. He has been classified as 1-A by Local Board #75, meaning he was available for unrestricted service. Dr. King wanted to change Houck's classification to 1-O based on Houck's moral devotion to peace.

Letter from MLK to Jim Harney of Saint Gregory's Rectory

Dr. King thanks Jim Harney for his letter of support. He touches on his own views of Vietnam, pointing out that the war is a symptom of a deeper problem, and those who seek peace through nonviolence must always strive to make their voices be heard.

Letter From MLK to Judge B.

Dr. King writes to Judge B, inviting him to the Board Meeting in Washington D.C. The meeting is to discuss the War in Vietnam and Poor People's Campaign.

Letter from MLK to Margaret Archibald

Dr. King informs Mrs. Archibald of the importance of continuously fighting for peace, not only domestically, but in foreign affairs as well.

Letter from MLK to Mr. & Mrs. Frank Kuhlman about Support

In this letter Dr. King expresses his belated gratitude to Mr. and Mrs. Frank Kuhlman for their letter of support. Dr. King also comments on nonviolence and the war in Vietnam.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Eugene Patterson

Dr. King addresses Mr. Patterson's editorials discussing "sincere questions and doubts" about Dr. King's stance on the conflict in Vietnam.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Gambbacinni

Dr. King acknowledges Mr. Gambaccini's request to the Pope for peace regarding the Vietnam War. Dr. King adds, "As the strength of our world's weapons increases and the war in Vietnam continues to escalate the crying need for world peace becomes greater and greater."

Letter from MLK to Mr. P. H. Waldraff

Dr. King shares his views of the American military presence in Vietnam and America's moral obligation to social justice.

Pages