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Strategic Planning

Associated Archive Content : 54 results

Nobel Prize Atlanta Dinner Address Outline

Dr. King outlines his address for the January 27, 1965 recognition dinner honoring him for the Nobel Peace Prize. He intends to speak on topics of racial justice, nonviolence and poverty, while discussing the strides made by the movement and the uphill battles still to be faced. Over 1000 people attended the program, the first integrated dinner in Atlanta's history.

Press Release for the Southern Negro Leaders Conference

Dr. King, Rev. C.K. Steele, and Rev. F. L. Shuttlesworth called for an emergency conference to strategize and unify further bus desegregation efforts in the south. This is the press release announcing the meeting of the Southern Negro Leaders Conference on Transportation and Non-violent Integration. The agenda was ambitious, but specific and explicit. One of the outcomes of the meeting was the formation of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, with Dr. King chosen to lead.

Program of the Chicago Freedom Movement

The SCLC and the Coordinating Council of Community Organizations (CCCO) issues a program addressing the goals of the Chicago Freedom Movement. The Chicago Freedom Movement is composed of a coalition of organizations who have decided to eradicate slums, ghettos and racism from the city.

Public Meeting Program Agenda

This document outlines the participants of a two-day public meeting beginning on September 26, 1962. Reverend Fred Shuttlesworth presides over the meeting in which the "Rosa Parks Freedom Award" is presented by Rosa Parks and Adam Clayton Powell.

Recommendations to Committee on Future Program

Dr. King outlines several initiatives of the SCLC and other civil rights leaders.

Registration for the Annual Youth Retreat

This is a document from Reverend Earl Stirewalt with information on the annual Youth Retreat of the Georgia Baptist Convention. The retreat aims to aid in the spiritual growth of young men and women.

Report on Workshop for the Huntsville Movement

This is a report about the civil rights movement in Huntsville, Alabama in the early 1960's. Hank Thomas, a CORE Field Representative, cultivated a group of students from Alabama A & M to conduct sit-ins and non-violent demonstrations at local businesses.

Response from MLK to Paul Yeiter

Dr. King responds to Yeiter's questioning of his support of plans to boycott the 1968 Olympic games. Dr. King argues that Negro athletes have presented specific and reasonable demands to the Olympic Committee, which reflects a valid concern for the social welfare and progress of the whole nation. He commends these athletes for their determination and courageous stand against racism and injustice.

Revised School Desegregation Policies Under Civil Rights Act of 1964

This document, published by the U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, gives revised policies for school desegregation. The list of areas covered includes unequal programs and facilities, desegregation of staff and dismissals.

Revolt Without Violence - The Negroes' New Strategy

In this 1960 U.S. News & World Report article, Dr. King discusses the lunch counter sit-in movement spurring across the American South, the nonviolent approach to civil rights demonstrations, and the evolving status of the Negro.

SCLC Minutes

This undated and unsigned memorandum functions essentially as minutes for an SCLC strategy session.

SCLC Newsletter: June-July 1965

The cover story for this 1965 SCLC Newsletter features Dr. King leading a March in Chicago, and also includes the usual wide gamut of Civil Rights Movement issues. Editor Ed Clayton's column discusses the "loss of fear" among Negroes, who "never again will be systematically excluded from office, or driven back from the voting booth."

SCLC Pamphlet- Why?

This brochure highlights the various forms of discrimination African Americans faced in Alabama, primarily the legal right to vote. Housing, unemployment, and police brutality are other key topics discussed. There is also a call to action on solutions for these problems.

SCLC Tour of Northern Cities

Dr. King announces an SCLC tour of Chicago, Cleveland, Philadelphia and Washington, DC. He cites the wish to establish communication with people in the black ghettos of northern cities and to assist local leadership in taking movement issues into their communities. He mentions the moral and material support provided by northern allies for the southern struggle and a time to reciprocate.

SCLC Voter Registration Report

After having a successful election year as a result of voter registration in Georgia and Tennessee in 1962, the SCLC decided to approach the whole South in attempting to get African Americans to vote. This report gives an overview of the voting situation at that time across the southern states. Other organizations, such as SNCC and the Southwide Voter Education Project, are also referenced as key organizations who helped influenced voter registration.

Sen. Edward Brooke Press Release

Senator Edward Brooke of Massachusetts travels to Africa to discuss world affairs and the needs of the country with African leaders. Also, his itinerary for the trip is present.

Speeches by the Leaders

In this booklet, the NAACP compiled famous speeches from the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. Included are speeches from A. Philip Randolph, Roy Wilkins, James Farmer, Rev. Eugene Carson Blake, Rabbi Joachim Prinz, Whitney M. Young, Matthew Ahmann, John Lewis, Walter Reuther, and Dr. King. The booklet concludes with a pledge and a picture of the throng of supporters that attended the event. test

Statement to SCLC Board: Alabama Movement

Dr. King discusses the various issues within the State of Alabama. Dr. King and the SCLC have maintained leadership in the Alabama Movement and have proposed a plan to continue the acts of nonviolence.

Suggested Approach and Chronology for St. Augustine

Wyatt Tee Walker writes Dr. King about the purpose, need and strategy for the St. Augustine demonstrations. In this letter there are details for proper attire and a schedule of demonstrations.

Telegram from Marvin Rich to MLK

Marvin Rich informs Dr. King of a resolution that was adopted at a recent conference. The resolution called for a summit of civil rights leaders.

Telegram from Winfield P. Woolf, Jr. to the SCLC Board of Strategy

Just three days before the assassination, Winfield P. Woolf, Jr. asserts that removing Dr. King from the SCLC would be disastrous.

The New York Times: New Way Sought to Teach Rights

Columbia University and its Teachers College plan to begin a nationwide initiative to improve the teaching of civil rights. The plan will not only apply to elementary and secondary schools but also to college, universities and adult education forums. Instead of using textbooks, teachers will utilize case studies and films to keep information up to date.

Transformed Nonconformists Sermon Outline

In this brief outline for a sermon based on Romans 12:2, Dr. King asserts that Christians are citizens of two worlds, those of time and eternity. They are in the world, but not of it. In a generation of the mass mind, they are called to live differently – to make history not be made by history. But nonconformity in itself is not good; there must be a mental transformation. The world is on the brink of moral and physical destruction and the need of the hour is for nonconformists to materialism, nationalism and militarism.

U.S. News & World Report: Negro Leaders Tell Their Plans for '64

Past, present and future efforts in the area of civil rights are discussed in interviews of five organizational leaders in the civil rights movement. These leaders are: Whitney M. Young, Jr. of the National Urban League, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. of the SCLC, Roy Wilkins of the NAACP, James L. Farmer of CORE, and James Forman of SNCC.

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