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Social Justice

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Friends Journal: A Quaker Weekly

Dr. King's article, "Nonviolence and Racial Justice" is included in this edition of the Friends Journal. Dr. King's entry discusses the various implications of race relations in America and the beneficial elements of nonviolence.

Gandhi Society for Human Rights Address by MLK

Dr. King speaks at a luncheon launching the Gandhi Society on May 17, 1962, citing the great significance of the day: the anniversary of the US Supreme Court decision declaring school segregation unconstitutional, the 100th anniversary of Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation and the centennial of the death of Henry David Thoreau, whose essay on civil disobedience influenced Gandhi. He announces that earlier that day he sent President Kennedy a document seeking an executive order proclaiming all forms of segregation to be a violation of the US Constitution.

God

Dr. King references the Book of Amos regarding the ethics of God. According to the scriptures God is just and fair and demands "justice and sacrifice."

Handwritten Draft Letter from MLK

Dr. King expresses his gratitude for the generous contribution made by Mr. Hunter and addresses questions that were asked in a previous letter.

How My Mind has Changed in the Last Decade

Dr. King writes notes on how his mind has changed in recent years. King states that while his main focus was on theology and philosophy, he also focused on social ethics. According to Dr. King, segregation is a tool that exploits the Negro and poor whites. He saw similarities with the liberation of India's people from Britain and asserts that his trip to India cultivated his ideologies on nonviolence.

How Urban League Helps City on Day-to-Day Basis

In this article, the council, activities, and contributions of the Urban League are discussed. Edwin C. Berry, the league's executive secretary, believes that contributions have decreased due to the league's refusal to take a stand against civil rights demonstrations. Mr. Berry is hopeful that contributors will return their support to make Chicago a "hallmark of democracy."

Hungry Club Speech

This document is a draft copy of Dr. King's Hungry Club Speech, in which he speaks on the subject "America's Chief Moral Dilemma." He states that the dilemma is "the means by which we live have out distanced the ends for which we live." Dr. King thoroughly discusses the three major evils that contribute to this dilemma: the evil of racism, the evil poverty, and the evil of war. He also discusses the progress of the Civil Rights Movement as it enters a new phase of fighting for "genuine equality."

I HAVE A DREAM

Text of Dr. King's "I Have a Dream" speech delivered August 28, 1963 at the Lincoln Memorial, Washington, D. C.

I'll Take My Stand

Thelmore Cooper Trotman composes this poem entitled "Ill Take My Stand." The poem expresses the plight of the Negro struggle and the injustices of a case involving the rights of five Negros. Mr. Trotman elaborates on his personal health as he is of old age and explains his appreciation for Dr. King's organization.

If I were a Negro

Rabbi I. Usher Kirshblum writes Dr. King to share an article he wrote in the "Jewish Center of Kew Garden Hills Bulletin." The article references the expelling of Congressman Adam Clayton Powell and criticizes the African American response towards his defense. The author states, "If I were a Negro I would not waste my time in defending Powell's wrong acts but would rather speak of the many good acts he performed." Rabbi Kirshblum goes on to praise the views of men like Dr. King and Rev. Roy Wilkins, while rejecting those of Stokely Carmichael.

II Samuel Class Notes

Dr. King outlines the biblical Book of II Samuel by topic.

Invitation from Robert S. Bilheimer to MLK to Attend a Consultation Seminar

Robert S. Bilheimer, Associate General Secretary for the World Council of Churches, invites Dr. King to attend a consultation on Christian Practices and Desirable Action in Social Change and Race Relations.

Invitation to Emergency Convocation: The Urban Coalition

This letter from Andrew Heiskell and A. Philip Randolph invites Dr. King to attend the Emergency Convocation of the Urban Coalition, to address the issue of violence in 104 cities. The goals set forth in the letter include an emergency work program, a major expansion of the private sector for job provision and training, and establishment of a long-range program for the physical and social reconstruction of American cities.

Invitation to the 16th Annual Convention for the Synod of Toronto and Kingston Presbyterian Young People'e Society

Jack Green and David Powell invite Dr. King to speak at the 16th Annual Convention for the Synod of Toronto and Kingston Presbyterian Young People's Society. The theme of the convention is "First They Gave Themselves." CBC National Television Network has offered to televise Dr. King's speech.

Isaiah

Dr. King references the Old Testament biblical Book of Isaiah regarding topics like ritual sacrifice, knowledge, social ethics, and the doctrine of man.

It's Hard to Be a Christian

Dr. King outlines his sermon entitled "It's Hard to Be a Christian." King asserts that in order for one to be a fully committed Christian he or she must subordinate their ego and prioritize their concern for God's kingdom.

John F. Kennedy Award Dinner for MLK

The Catholic Interracial Council sponsors the John F. Kennedy Dinner for Dr. King. The Master of Ceremonies will be Sister Mary William and will take place at the Pick-Congress Hotel.

Join the Ranks! Support A Worker

An SCLC field worker writes to gain support for the SCLC so that the organization can fulfill its mission to help blacks "achieve full citizenship rights, stimulate nonviolent mass action, and secure the right to vote."

Joint Statement on Violence in the Cities

Dr. King, A. Philip Randolph, Whitney M. Young Jr., and Roy Wilkins issue a joint statement urging Negro Americans in cities such as Newark and Detroit to end the public disorder and rioting. The civil rights leaders emphasize the potential damage the urban riots pose to "the Negro population, to the civil rights cause, and to the entire nation."

Justice Harlan Concurring

This newspaper article discusses John Marshall Harlan's dissent with the case of "Plessy vs. Ferguson," and how Harlan was not acknowledged when the case was overturned.

Justice in Mississippi

Dora McDonald records notes by Dr. King concerning an unjust ruling in Mississippi. He claims that more legislation is needed to enable the federal courts to prosecute these crimes.

Justice Versus Injustice

Dr. King explains that the power that establishes justice also generates injustice. He also references an ancient Egyptian story "The Eloquent Peasant" and James Henry Breasted's "The Dawn of Conscience."

Let My People Vote

In this statement for the Amsterdam News, Dr. King assures that a victory is in the midst regarding the Senate's recent passage of the voting bill. He elaborates on the objectives of SCOPE, as there is much to accomplish. He ends the statement with the battle cry, "Let My People Vote."

Letter from A Republican to MLK

Signing as "A Republican," the writer informs Dr. King that the draft for the war is the Democrats' method of using blacks for involuntary servitude. This information is to serve as support of the writer's belief that the Democrats will "return the negroes to slavery."

Letter from a Weary Taxpayer to MLK

A weary taxpayer writes Dr. King informing him that a 15 million dollar bond issue was passed to pave roads in Cobb County; however, blacks cannot buy property in the area. The writer is angered because Negroes still have to help pay off the bond through taxes and asserts that the case must be taken to federal court.

Letter from Abram Eisenman to MLK

Abram Eisenman expresses appreciation and admiration for Dr. King's work. Eisenman also
addresses the divide of supporters within the Civil Rights Movement concerning the Vietnam War.

Letter from an Asylum Inmate to MLK Seeking Assistance

Paul Douglas Ware, an untried inmate, requests Dr. King's "understanding, moral support, and possible assistance." Mr. Ware informs Dr. King of detailed information regarding his unjust treatment, his personal life, his present state of mind and most importantly his desire to have a stronger bond with "his own people."

Letter from Angilcan Students' Federation to MLK

Stephen Hayes, of the National Union of South African Students, invites Dr. King to speak at their open national congress. The subject of discussion is "The Role of the Christian Student in the Struggle for Social Justice." Hayes does fear that the South African government might refuse to grant Dr. King a visa if he accepts the invitation.

Letter from Anna Hedgeman to MLK

Dr. Hedgeman writes Dr. King to express her support for Dr. King's quality service that he has given America. He then targets Dr. King on a letter he received on the representation of the slogan "Black Power." Dr. Hedgeman feels the slogan relates strongly towards extremists and black supremacy. Lastly, she encloses a small contribution and two letters.

Letter from Anonymous Writer to MLK

The author of this letter copies an article "Communists Meet the Church," published by the San Francisco Examiner and Chronicle, to support his accusations of cooperation between the Catholic Church and Communists.

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