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Selma-Montgomery Rights March, 1965

Associated Archive Content : 87 results

Letter from Martha Williams to MLK

Martha Williams, who serves as the Acting Secretary of "The Zippers," a Chicago-based social and charity club, forwards a donation to the SCLC. She discusses the recent march from Selma to Montgomery when Alabama guardsmen respectfully removed their helmets during a prayer at the culminating rally. Williams extends a special prayer of protection for Dr. King and civil rights workers.

Letter from Mary Bull to MLK

Mary Bull writes Dr. King expressing her sentiments towards the concept of racial separatism, and how it causes detriment to the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Pastor Paul S. Barru to MLK

The pastor of First Presbyterian Church in Glenwood Springs, Colorado sends the SCLC a contribution on behalf of his church and the Denver Christian Center. He references a recent Wilcox County, Alabama tour which he feels reflects the type of "creative" activity that is most beneficial for exposing "a window into the rural South for the ignorant North."

Letter from Rev. Andrew T. Denholm to MLK

Rev. Andrew Denholm of St. Paul's United Church in Paris, Ontario send Dr. King a financial contribution and inquires about the need of northern whites for the march from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama. He also inquires about the possibility of a civil rights worker addressing a group of people in his town.

Letter from Robert Bondy to MLK

Though a long time supporter of Dr. King, Robert Bondy, criticizes for Dr. King for mixing the issues of civil rights and Vietnam. He argues that speaking out against Vietnam has only further inflamed opponents of the Civil Rights Movement, and Dr. King has thrown back the movment "for a long time to come."

Letter from Seabury Press to MLK

Alda Lee Boyd, publicity director for the Seabury Press, asks Dr. King if he would write a statement that can be used to promote "The Jon Daniels Story." The book is about an Episcopal seminary student, Jonathan Daniels, who was killed while working in Mississippi following the Selma to Montgomery March.

Letter from SNCC Chairman John Lewis to William Shawn

John Lewis, Chairman of SNCC, responds to a recent article in "The New Yorker." He provides a number of corrections to the article and also explains who should be considered official spokespersons for SNCC.

Letter from SNCC Executive Committee to MLK

John Lewis and Silas Norman of SNCC write Dr. King to address their organization's grievances with the SCLC, specifically the SCLC's lack of cooperation in the Selma Voting Rights campaign. Members of SNCC state their disagreement with the march planned for March 7, 1965 because "the objectives of the march do not justify the danger and the resources involved." Lewis and Norman request a meeting with Dr. King to discuss reconciliation between SNCC and the SCLC.

Letter from Victor Carter to MLK

Victor Carter writes a letter of support to Dr. King on behalf of he and his wife. The Carters are unable to attend the Selma to Montgomery march but enclose a check to aid in the civil right struggle.

Letter from Washington University to MLK

Faculty of the Political Science Department at Washington University release a resolution supporting Dr. King and his efforts to secure voting rights for Negroes in Selma, Alabama. They urge the Federal Government to take a serious look at this issue following recent attacks upon Negroes trying to exercise their right to vote.

Letter from Whitey the Honkey to MLK

The author stresses that Dr. King is a part of the race problem. They offer numerous political suggestions and concludes that Dr. King should simply mind his own personal matters.

Letter from William W. Boyer to MLK

This Letter from William W. Boyer, Chairman of the Convocations Committee, to Dr. King informs Dr. King the transcription of his "Future of Integration" speech to the Kansas State University academic community has arrived. A copy of the transcription will be published in Issues 1968.
This enclosed transcription of his speech addresses many varied issues affecting American society.

Letter to MLK Regarding Merit Award

The author writes a letter that advocates for Dr. King to win an award of merit. In the letter, he discusses some major events that occurred throughout the Reverend's life. Some of these events include: leading the Civil Rights Movement, winning the Nobel Peace Prize, and becoming a strong political figure.

MLK Address at Mass Meeting in Eutaw, Alabama

Dr. King challenges the Negro residents of Eutaw, Alabama to participate in the upcoming SCLC Poor People's Campaign. In this address, he urges the citizens of Eutaw to occupy Washington, D.C. in an effort to press Congress for a redistribution of wealth in America. He urges, "All ye who are tired of segregation and discrimination, come unto us. All ye who are overworked and underpaid, come unto us."

MLK Address to District 65, AFL-CIO

This is the text of an address Dr. King gave to District 65, American Federation of Labor and Congress of Industrial Organizations. Dr. King references his stay in Birmingham Jail and expresses his optimism that the nonviolent movement will be successful.

MLK and the Alabama Boycott

This caricature of Dr. King depicts his trail from the March on Washington to his pursuing a boycott on the state of Alabama, following the Selma to Montgomery March. Gib Crockett of the Washington Star is the cartoonist for this drawing.

MLK Interview on NBC's Meet the Press

This edition of NBC's Meet the Press featured Dr. King for a discussion concerning the Civil Rights Movement and its demonstrations. The interview was moderated by Ned Brooks and the panel featured John Chancellor, James J. Kilpatrick, Tom Wicker and Lawrence E. Spivak.

MLK Memorandum: Plans for Selma, Alabama

Dr. King outlines his plan for civil rights goals in Selma, Alabama.

MLK Reflections on the Selma March, Bloody Sunday, SNCC and Communism

Dr. King discusses the Selma to Montgomery march, calling it the "most powerful and dramatic civil rights protest ever held in the south." Dr. King also addresses criticism of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee's tactics. He concludes these notes by responding to claims that he has communist ties, denying any foreign or left-wing influence on his actions. Of Bayard Rustin and C. T.

MLK's Address to Syracuse University

Dr. King, in a public speech at Howard University, talks about numerous factors that affect education in America.

Mobilizer: February 1967

This February 1967 issue of the "Mobilizer: To End Mass Murder in Vietnam" focuses on James Bevel's direct action anti-war demonstrations. As National Director of the Spring Mobilization Committee to End the War in Vietnam, Bevel outlines his strategy to launch a national movement involving community churches, students, labor groups, and others. The initiative is designed around a march to be held on April 15, 1967 in San Francisco and New York.

MSGR. Victor G. Moser's Statements Relating to Selma-Montgomery March

Victor G. Moser recounts the activities that took place during the march on Montgomery ,which was one of a serious, dedicated, even religious commitment to a project which would really bring out the serious injustice being perpetrated upon a persecuted and disadvantaged people.

National Council of Churches Conference of Negro Leaders Opening Remarks

A. Philip Randolph makes remarks at the Conference of Negro Leaders National Council of Churches about the future of the Civil Rights Movement. Randolph expresses the importance of continuing the fight of social justice through civil rights, economics, housing and poverty.

Newsmakers Interview with MLK

Los Angeles' Channel 2 interviews Dr. King for its Newsmakers program. Topics include King's call for a negotiated settlement in Vietnam and the resulting criticism by other civil rights leaders, plans for mass demonstrations in Los Angeles on the poverty bill, King's position on the armed group called the Deacons and his commitment to nonviolence, and how he responds to the personal threats on his life.

Newsweek: Road to Selma - Hope & Death

Newsweek issues this synopsis of the 1965 voting rights march from Selma to Montgomery. The article illustrates the details surrounding the brutal racial murder of Viola Liuzzo, delving into the federal investigation of Mrs. Liuzzo's murder and its impact on the future passage of the pending 1965 Voting Rights Act.

Questions and Answers on the Civil Rights Act of 1967

This document contains questions and answers on the proposed Civil Rights Act of 1967 regarding federal and state jury trials, equal employment, fair housing, protection against interference with constitutional rights, and extending the life of the civil rights commission.

Saturday Review: Behind the Selma March

Dr. King describes the events surrounding the Selma-Montgomery Civil Rights March of 1965.

SCLC Annual Report by MLK, 1965

Dr King delivered this report at the SCLC's ninth annual national convention in Birmingham, Alabama. Serving essentially as a State of the Union address for the SCLC, the report touches on the major topics of the Civil Rights Movement and the recent achievements and goals of the SCLC.

SCLC Booklet

This booklet describes the programs and actions of the SCLC. It explains why it is a movement organization as well as defining the King-Abernathy tradition.

SCLC Brochure: This is SCLC

SCLC outlines its history, achievements, initiatives and leadership in this brochure.

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