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Riots

Associated Archive Content : 205 results

Letter from Ruth E. Foster to MLK

Mrs. Foster writes Dr. King expressing doubt in his nonviolent methods. She feels his nonviolent marches are an ineffective way to gain equality for Negroes.

Letter from S. Scott to MLK

S. Scott states how he objects to Dr. King's leadership because he believes that Dr. King's influence has resulted in lawless riots. Mr. Scott suggests alternatives for those who live in the "slums" and identifies education as a means of advancement. Furthermore, Mr. Scott assures results from the Civil Rights Bill in time.

Letter from Sam Gasbarre to MLK

Sam Gasbarre, identifying himself as a white American, writes Dr. King to support his opinion that the Vietnam War is evil and should end.

Letter from Secretary to Daniel C. Thompson

Dr. King's Secretary writes Dr. Daniel Thompson of Howard University and encloses a foreword written by Dr. King, discussing violence and the philosophies of Mahatma Gandhi.

Letter from Soma Ragir to MLK

Soma Ragir extends her support for Dr. King's planned Poor People's March on Washington, but expresses her desire for heightened political organization in order to elect black congressional members who can ultimately "reform our social system."

Letter from Stephen Harris to MLK

Numerous riots have occurred at Marble Mountain Air Base in Vietnam due to mounting racial tensions. Stephen Harris, of the United States Marine Corps, writes to Dr. King and Stokely Carmichael addressing his frustration and the concerns of many Negro servicemen stationed there.

Letter from the Faculty of the Tuskegee Institute to President Kennedy

Members of the faculty and staff of Tuskegee Institute issue a plea to President John F. Kennedy to intervene in the Birmingham crisis of 1963. They request that the President use an upcoming speech to discuss Constitutional rights, send the FBI to Alabama to investigate "charges of police brutality," and revoke federal funds that support segregation and persuade business leaders to desegregate public facilities.

Letter from Thomas G. Carson to MLK

Thomas G. Carson writes Dr. King as a white supporter of civil rights legislation, but fed-up with what he feels are the changing views of Dr. King and the riots "committed by Negroes in the name of civil rights."

Letter from W. B. Blix to MLK

W. B. Blix writes to Dr. King to express his support of the Civil Rights Movement. However, Blix also informs Dr. King that he has lost his support because of Dr. King's preemptive decision to commit civil disobedience if the Poor People's March on Washington is unsuccessful.

Letter from W. Russell Smith to MLK

On behalf of the Interfraternity Council of Lehigh University, W. Russell Smith invites Dr. King to present his views on civil rights.

Letter from Wallis E. Wood to MLK

Mr. Wood requests an interview with Dr. King to discuss Operation Breadbasket.

Letter from Wendell K. Jones to MLK and Leon M. Sullivan

This is a letter of support to Dr. King from Wendell K. Jones for his tireless work on behalf of African Americans. Mr. Jones also recognizes Rev. Leon M. Sullivan for helping African Americans in Massachusetts.

Letter from William Kivi to MLK

William Kivi forwards Dr. King a copy of a postcard addressed to President Lyndon Johnson. The correspondence alleges that the riots occuring in urban cities are a result of a economic stronghold to keep, in Kivi's view, "oppressing the oppressed." Kivi uses an example of California Governor Ronald Reagan's proposal to nix any federal program that supplements the War on Poverty.

Letter from William W. Boyer to MLK

This Letter from William W. Boyer, Chairman of the Convocations Committee, to Dr. King informs Dr. King the transcription of his "Future of Integration" speech to the Kansas State University academic community has arrived. A copy of the transcription will be published in Issues 1968.
This enclosed transcription of his speech addresses many varied issues affecting American society.

Letter Regarding Politics

The author discusses political issues regrading the president and political parties. In addition, the author suggests that Black Power leaders should obtain positions within the "nut house" and the NAACP should support these appointments.

Letter Regarding the Emergency Convocation of the Urban Coalition

A letter drafted by Andrew Heiskell and A. Philip Randolph, co-Chairmen of the Urban Coalition. includes article clippings from various newspapers discussing the dire need for public service employment, private employment, educational disparities, reconstruction and urban development, and equal housing opportunities.

Letter to MLK from A. P. Swiderskas

Mr. Swiderskas writes to Dr. King expressing his general hatered of the black race.

Letter to MLK from Angry Citizen of Detroit

A bothered citizen of Detroit writes Dr. King, who is referred to as the "negro champion," to express personal views on the status of the Negroes in the city.

Letter to MLK Regarding the Direction of the Movement

The author expresses her opinion about Dr. King and how he should use his "impressive" vocabulary in the right direction. She further elaborates on her perceptions of the police protection, mobs, labor needs, and more.

Los Angeles Times: Prophetic Talk of Dr. King

Carl Greenberg, Political Editor for the Los Angeles Times, wrote this editorial about Dr. King's final trip to California and his opinion on the 1968 Presidential Campaign. Mr. Greenberg describes Dr. King's assessment of the war on poverty, the 1968 Democratic National Convention and possible support for Eugene McCarthy or Robert Kennedy.

Martin Luther King....At Communist Training School

This advertisement printed in the Augusta Courier accuses Dr. King and several constituents of communist involvement.

Meet the Press Interview

This is a transcript of NBC television's Meet the Press interview with Dr. King in August 1967 with Edwin Newman as moderator. King answered questions about his views on the Vietnam conflict, nonviolence, and the presidency of Lyndon B. Johnson.

Meet the Press Interview with Roy Wilkins and MLK

This document is a transcript of NBC’s “Meet the Press” televised press conference with Dr. King and Roy Wilkins. The program is moderated by Ned Brooks. Frank Van Der Linden, Robert MacNeil, Richard Wilson, and Lawrence Spivak are panelists. Some of the topics covered are the goals of the March on Washington, a concern about whether the Civil Rights Movement is pushing too hard, and past political affiliations of Bayard Rustin.

Memorandum to the SCLC Staff

In a memorandum sent to the SCLC staff, just days before Dr. King's assassination, Tom Offenburger informs members of a meeting Dr. King had with his advisers. The main focus of the meeting was the march in Memphis which turned violent, as well as the future of the Poor People's Campaign. In spite of the violence, there remains plans to go to Washington and correct the economic racism the US faces.

MLK Address at the Georgia State Capitol Regarding Julian Bond

Dr. King delivers this speech at the State Capitol of Georgia protesting the legislation refusal to seat black politician Julian Bond. King calls this a "grave injustice" particularly since the state legislature of Georgia considers itself protecting the United States Constitution. Dr. King points out the irony of this act and exposes other irresponsible actions of the legislature.

MLK Address at the University of Chicago

Dr. King delivers this speech at the University of Chicago on January 27, 1966. He expounds upon the struggles of the Negro family in America, explaining the social and economic challenges the Negro faces along with the affects of slavery.

MLK Address on Racial Injustice, Poverty, and War

Dr. King addresses the French community during his "Racial Injustice, Poverty, and War" speech. He discusses topics such as poverty, politics, war, and the government.

MLK Address to Southern Association of Political Scientists

Dr. King addresses the Southern Association of Political Scientists in November of 1964. This address consists of the accomplishments made because of the Civil Rights Movement and areas that society needs to improve upon.

MLK Address to the Tenth Anniversary Convention of the SCLC

Dr. King, at the Tenth Anniversary Convention of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, addresses numerous civil rights issues the organization is addressing throughout America.

MLK Addresses Riots and War

Dr. King encourages friends to support nonviolence in order to avoid physical or moral destruction. He explains that the, "SCLC cannot support riots for moral and pragmatic reasons."

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