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Prayer

Associated Archive Content : 117 results

Letter from Esther G. Stone to MLK

Esther G. Stone writes to Dr. King to express her opinions on Negro leadership, American politics, and the Vietnam War. Stone writes that President Lyndon Johnson has done so much for Negroes and that Mrs. Johnson did not deserve the hurtful remarks of Eartha Kitt.

Letter from Franklin I. Gamwell with Enclosed Copy of the Interracial News Service Newsletter

Franklin I. Gamwell, of the Student Interracial Ministry, requests if Dr. King would like to have an intern student at Ebenezer Baptist Church for 1963.
Interracial News Service describes the experiences of many Student Interracial Ministry participants and the pastors of the churches they spent the summers with.

Letter from Gloria Caruthers to MLK

Miss Caruthers congratulates Dr. King on being the recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize. She states that no other individual is more deserving of the award.

Letter from Hazel Jardine to MLK and CSK

Mrs. Hazel Jardine commends Dr. King on his efforts to obtain equality for all men.

Letter from Helen Marrow to MLK

Mrs. Marrow thanks Dr. King for his leadership and position on the Vietnam War. She also encloses a special composition dedicated to Dr. King for his commitment to peace.

Letter from J. L. Richard to MLK

Reverend J. L. Richard, from Evergreen Baptist Church, sends prayers for Dr. King and the Negro race. Richard also sends a monetary contribution to the SCLC.

Letter from Jack Hopkins to Senator Morse

In a letter to Senator Wayne L. Morse, Jack Hopkins addresses his personal issues with the United States. He begins with a discussion of the conflict in Vietnam, and believes the United States is handling it poorly. He then expresses his feelings on the Jewish race and the establishment of a Jewish nation. He concludes his letter saying that the United States never tries to solve problems; rather it creates the foundation for a new war.

Letter from Jean and Hildegard Goss-Mayr to MLK

Jean and Hildegard Goss-Mayr, of the International Fellowship of Reconciliation, invite Dr. King to speak at a meeting in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. They also congratulate him on winning the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from Juanita Kurtza to MLK

Juanita Kurtza sends Dr. King a list of scriptures to encourage him in his work. She also apologizes for her inability to send money.

Letter from Juanita to MLK

Juanita offers praise and gratitude to Dr. King for his assistance regarding some imprisoned associates. Juanita also offers her prayers to Dr. King.

Letter from Julia Smith to MLK

Julia Smith asks Dr. King to pray for her because she wants to study nursing at Michigan State University, a predominately white school at the time. She also reminds Dr. King of their previous encounter in St. Louis, Missouri where she shook his hand.

Letter from Keith Black to MLK

Keith Black, on behalf of the Valley Community Presbyterian Church, sends Dr. King a check for the SCLC.

Letter from Leila Robins to MLK

Mrs. Robins thanks Dr. King for his stance against the Vietnam War. She and her fellow Canadians who object to their government supplying the United States with arms are particularly glad to hear him speak out against the war.

Letter from Lewis J. Stemn to MLK

Writing from Monrovia, Liberia, Lewis J. Stemn shares his belief that one should adapt the idea to "love thy neighbor as thyself" to all facets of life.

Letter from Marguerite B. Pilling to Dr. Ralph D. Abernathy

Marguerite B. Pilling writes Dr. Abernathy to show her support of the Civil Rights Movement. She believes the Negro could actually bring the United States back to a time of decency by bringing back prayer in public schools and removing violence from TV.

Letter from Mary Welcome to MLK

Miss Welcome praises the work that Dr. King has done for civil rights. She also offers him her prayers and promises to send money to aid the cause when she is able to afford it.

Letter from MLK to Alvin Jackson

Dr. King advises Alvin Jackson to contact the NAACP Legal Defense Fund to obtain assistance.

Letter from MLK to Birch Bayh

Dr. King expresses gratitude for Birch Bayh's support of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. In addition, Dr. King prays for Mr. Bayh's recovery from his recent accident.

Letter from MLK to Chandrasekhar Bhattacharya

Dr. King writes Chandrasekhar Bhattacharya in response to a letter that requested prayer for their first born child, Chiraashree. Dr. King expresses his appreciation for their sentiments regarding his work and informs Bhattacharya that their child will forever be in his prayers.

Letter from MLK to Corine Jenkins About Prayer

In this letter, Dr. King replies to Corine Jenkins regarding her missing daughter. He informs her that she and her daughter are in his prayers.

Letter from MLK to Esther Thompson

Dr. King informs Mrs. Thompson that the SCLC does not have the resources to help aid her husband's sight. Dr. King recommends that she contact churches in her area for help.

Letter from MLK to Fredrik Schjander

Dr. King responds to a survey of five questions from Fredrik Schjander regarding the world's chances for peace. Dr. King believes the prospects for world peace have actually declined since he received the Nobel Peace Prize in 1964, due to conflicts in areas such as Kashmir and Vietnam. Dr. King does write that the growing role of the United Nations as a global mediator is an encouraging sign.

Letter from MLK to Governor Nelson A. Rockefeller

In this letter, Dr. King writes to New York Governor Nelson A. Rockefeller to express his gratitude for the Governor's letter and copy of his new book. Dr. King also refers to the possibility of Gov. Rockefeller's making "a large contribution to the Gandhi Society for Human Rights," and writes extensively about the Society and the effect such a contribution would have.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Nagle

Dr. King comments on a Supreme Court ruling that outlaws prayer and Bible reading in public schools. He asserts that the decision is consistant with the Constitution and is meant to keep any single religion from dominating the government.

Letter from MLK to Prisoner James C. Guyton

Dr. King sends his prayers to Mr. Guyton in his confinement and informs him that he will contact him when he has additional information.

Letter from MLK to Robert Wagner

Dr. King sends condolences to Mayor Robert Wagner consequent to his wife's death.

Letter from MLK to Willie Faust

Dr. King responds to a letter from Willie Gate Faust regarding an inquiry pertaining to legal advice and his release from jail. Reverend King refers the inmate to Attorney Donald Lee Hollowell, counsel for the NAACP.

Letter from Mrs. M. Happe to MLK

Mrs. M. Happe, a poor white woman, expresses gratitude to Dr. King for his campaign to clean up the slums in Chicago. She asserts that poverty is an issue, but education is the main problem and individuals cannot display appropriate behavior that they have never experienced.

Letter from Mrs. R. K. Matthews to Mrs. King

This letter is from a middle class housewife who expressed her despair and frustration to Mrs. King in learning of Dr. King's assassination.

Letter from Mrs. William Wenger to MLK

Mrs. Wenger pleads with Dr. King to never give up the fight for civil rights.

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