Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Nonviolence

Associated Archive Content : 867 results

etter from Mrs. Howard Wood to MLK

Mrs. Howard Wood conveys her support to Dr. King and the Civil Rights Movement after reading the novel "Stride Toward Freedom."

Examination for MLK Class

This document contains examination questions for Dr. King's class. Dr. King taught a class at Morehouse College briefly in the early 1960s.

Excerpt from MLK's Speech to the National Press Club

Dr. King discusses nonviolent resistance and freedom. He further challenges various communities by coining the slogan, "hate is always tragic."

Excerpt: "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" 1967

The "Quote" publication, from Indianapolis, issued a review of Dr. King's last book. Under the heading, "Book Review in Quotes", a preview of 10 quotations from "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" are listed, in this document. Black power, nonviolence and other subject matters are highlighted in the quotations. Dr. King's book was published and released in 1967.

Excerpts from The Negro and the American Dream

In this address to the Charlotte, North Carolina branch of the NAACP, Dr. King outlines five actions that Negroes must address in order to ensure their own first-class citizenship.

Executive Director's Report

William A. Rutherford sends an informal report to the SCLC Executive Board in Washington, D.C. This is Rutherford's first report as an administrator of the organization and it purposes the ways in which the SCLC can better utilize, and apply, their resources.

Facing the Challenge of a New Life

Dr. King uses Greek Philosophy, the Christian conception of agape love, and the need for nonviolent resistance as a guideline of "Facing the Challenge of a New Life" in America. Throughout the sermon, he encourages African Americans to remain committed to the nonviolent principles of the Montgomery Bus Boycott and the precepts of Christian living to facilitate the birth of a new way of life in an America dealing with violent conflicts over social conditions.

Farewell Statement by MLK

Dr. King writes a farewell statement to the people of India thanking them for their hospitality towards him, Mrs. King and Dr. Reddick. Dr. King pleas for world peace and asserts that India should take the lead in the call for universal disarmament.

Findings and Recommendation Committee

This is a recommendation to establish a temporary coordinating committee in Atlanta, GA to deal particularly in the areas of finance and communication.

Fiscal Facts about SCLC

This brochure outlines financial disclosure information regarding SCLC as a non-profit organization.

Fisk News: The Montgomery Story

This publication of Fisk News features one of Dr. King's speeches on page five. The speech is entitled "The Montgomery Story," and was delivered at the 13th Annual Institute of Race Relations at Fisk University. Dr. King commences to share of Rosa Parks' refusal to move from her bus seat and help begin the historic Montgomery Bus Boycott. Blacks boycotted public transportation for 7 months in Montgomery, Alabama and achieved success in changing the city's discriminatory practices.

For Healing of The Nations

The National Council of Churches of Christ in the USA publishes this brochure on peace and race relations, calling Christians into action with the responsibility of making brotherhood a reality. Guidelines are presented for individual Christians and Churches to follow in order to create a world full of love and free of racial turmoil.

Foreword of "The Power of Nonviolence"

This is a copy of a foreword written by Dr. King to Richard Gregg's "The Power of Nonviolence."

Founders Day Address

Dr. King addresses Spelman College at their Founders Day celebration. He discusses issues such as the Promised Land and the function of education.

Freedom Festival Speech on Chicago Campaign

At the Freedom Festival a speech was made in regards to the Chicago Campaign. The campaign focuses on the urban renewal of the area. Specifically, it discusses the unemployment rate and housing conditions of African-Americans.

Friends Journal: A Quaker Weekly

Dr. King's article, "Nonviolence and Racial Justice" is included in this edition of the Friends Journal. Dr. King's entry discusses the various implications of race relations in America and the beneficial elements of nonviolence.

Gandhi Society for Human Rights Address by MLK

Dr. King speaks at a luncheon launching the Gandhi Society on May 17, 1962, citing the great significance of the day: the anniversary of the US Supreme Court decision declaring school segregation unconstitutional, the 100th anniversary of Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation and the centennial of the death of Henry David Thoreau, whose essay on civil disobedience influenced Gandhi. He announces that earlier that day he sent President Kennedy a document seeking an executive order proclaiming all forms of segregation to be a violation of the US Constitution.

Great Man

Gene Lyle writes the editor of a newspaper article entitled "Americans Need Some Discipline" to address unjustified criticism expressed against Dr. King. The author is certain that the article persuaded some readers that Dr. King "is to be feared and despised" for being a contributor to civil unrest. However, the writer predicts that "Dr. King will enter American history...as one of the great men of all time."

Greetings Page-SCLC and ACMHR

The SCLC and the Alabama Christian Movement for Human Rights come together to host SCLC's annual convention in Birmingham, Alabama.

Help For Nigeria

Nigeria requests help from Negro civil rights leaders such as Dr. King, Randolph, and Roy Wilkins. Nigerians feel that the hate between the government and its people will result in war.

Highlander Center Press Release

This press release details the Highlander Center, an adult education center for people who come to learn how to deal with problems affecting their lives and communities, which was under investigation. The investigation was being conducted to determine if the Highland Center was integrated as stated in its charter.

How My Mind has Changed in the Last Decade

Dr. King writes notes on how his mind has changed in recent years. King states that while his main focus was on theology and philosophy, he also focused on social ethics. According to Dr. King, segregation is a tool that exploits the Negro and poor whites. He saw similarities with the liberation of India's people from Britain and asserts that his trip to India cultivated his ideologies on nonviolence.

Huge Crowd Hears King Speak

The University of Pittsburgh's campus newspaper, "The Pitt News," reports that Dr. King's speech drew a larger crowd than "John Kennedy, Theodore Sorenson or Herbert Aptheker when these men spoke at the University." Dr. King answers questions about issues such as Vietnam, Black Power, white backlash and Negro anti-Semitism. He also discussed the importance of an anti-poverty effort, particularly when examining what is spent on the war in Vietnam and the nation's space program.

Hungry Club Speech

This document is a draft copy of Dr. King's Hungry Club Speech, in which he speaks on the subject "America's Chief Moral Dilemma." He states that the dilemma is "the means by which we live have out distanced the ends for which we live." Dr. King thoroughly discusses the three major evils that contribute to this dilemma: the evil of racism, the evil poverty, and the evil of war. He also discusses the progress of the Civil Rights Movement as it enters a new phase of fighting for "genuine equality."

I HAVE A DREAM

Text of Dr. King's "I Have a Dream" speech delivered August 28, 1963 at the Lincoln Memorial, Washington, D. C.

I've Been To The Mountaintop

Dr. King delivers the "I've Been to the Mountaintop" speech at the Masonic Temple in Memphis, TN.

I've Been To The Mountaintop

"I've Been to the Mountaintop" is the last speech Dr. King delivered. A day after making this address at the Masonic Temple in Memphis, Tennessee, he was assassinated on the balcony of his hotel room. Dr. King spoke of faith, nonviolent protest and his support of the Memphis Sanitation Workers Strike. He urged both a march and a boycott against Memphis area businesses. Dr. King ended his speech by musing about his previous brush with death and other threats against him.

Information Regarding the Baha'i Faith

This excerpt on the Baha'i Faith claims that America is to be a leader in bringing world peace. The Baha'i faith has spread worldwide and promotes all religions as having a common golden rule.

Inquirer: "Not Accepting White Help Black Power Weakness"

The Atlanta Inquirer released this review on Dr. King's last book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" The review highlighted important issues transcribed in Dr. King's book. The most important issue, highlighted in the review, involved his views on the conflicts of the black power movement. "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" was released in 1967.

Institute of Non-Violence and Social Change: Reformation for Freedom

This 1957 program with the theme "Dignity with Humility, Love with Courage and Justice without Violence" details an event of the Institute of Non-Violence and Social Change, in which Dr. King is featured as a guest speaker. Though his affiliation is listed as President of Montgomery's Improvement Association, Dr. King appeared as leader of the nascent Southern Christian Leadership Conference, formed January 10, 1957.

Pages