Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Nonviolence

Associated Archive Content : 867 results

Answers in the American Way

This text derives from a television show outlining the facts of the Black Panther Party. In attendance were civil rights activist like Dr. King, Stokely Carmichael, H. Rapp Brown and their affiliates within the Civil Rights Movement.

Anti-Semitism, Israel and SCLC:- A Statement on Press Distortions

This is a document that addresses the impression that the press created reporting that the SCLC was part of a group that condemned Israel and endorsed the policies of the Arab powers. This document also includes the annual report of the president by Dr. King.

Appeal for Brotherhood to the City of Birmingham

On behalf of the Southern Alabama Movement for Human Rights and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, C. T. Vivian writes this appeal in the "spirit of nonviolent love" to the citizens of Birmingham. His purpose is to awaken conscientiousness and gain their support in creating brotherhood and a better city.

Appreciation Letter from MLK to Maitland Griggs

Dr. King expresses his gratitude for Maitland Griggs contribution to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Article Briefly Summarizing MLK's Life, Leadership and Accomplishments

This article acknowledges the many accomplishments made by Dr. King. The writer cites the various highlights of Dr. King's work and maintains "...America will never be the same."

Article on Prime Minister Pandit Jawaharlal Nehru

Article Written by the Spring Mobilization Committee To End the War in Vietnam

The following article written by the Spring Mobilization Committee illustrates the growing international support for ending the Vietnam War. It specifically highlights the Union of Vietnamese Students in France, an organization seeking to cooperate with American students in order to promote peace in Vietnam.

Article: "MLK Writes Co-Religionists from Jail"

The Witness Magazine published the first of Dr. King's "Letter from a Birmingham Jail." The second part will appear in the next issue on June 27, 1963. The article describes Dr. King's letter as "one of those rare 'to-read-twice' documents."

At the Beginning of the Youth Leadership Conference

While speaking to the Youth Leadership Conference in Raleigh, NC, Dr. King elaborates on the student sit-in movements, which he says served as a representation of the plight of the American Negro regarding their struggle for justice. Dr. King further lists the various details of their strategy for victory.

Bayard Rustin Statement on Schwerner, Goodman and Chaney

Baynard Rustin notes the recent violence against three Negro male volunteers in the voter registration drive. Mr. Rustin describes the death of these men as acts that violate the "constitutional rights" of the Negro people. In the hopes of Mr. Rustin, this occurence will initiate a new force of the nonviolent movement.

Beyond the Los Angeles Riots

Dr. King discusses the legacy of the Los Angeles riots in nonviolent protest. A decade after the Montgomery Civil Rights demonstrations, Dr. King speaks to the improvement of Southern African Americans' lives and the degradation of Northern African Americans' situations.

Beyond Vietnam

In Dr. Kings Beyond Vietnam address, he discusses seven major reasons for bringing Vietnam into "a field of moral vision," five things that the government should do to remove itself from conflict with Vietnam, the National Liberation Front of South Vietnam, and Premier Diem. Dr. King also encourages those in the churches and the synagogues to speak out against the war in Vietnam.

Biographical Sketch of Dr. Ralph David Avernathy

This biographical sketch of Dr. Abernathy outlines his positions, recognitions, education, travel experience and personal life. Dr. Abernathy served as President of the SCLC after Dr. King's death and also served as a member of the NAACP, and Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity, Inc.

Biographical Sketches of Leaders of the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom

These are biographical sketches of various leaders who were involved in the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedoms. These distinguished individuals were involved in organizations that focused on equality and nonviolence.

Black is Beautiful, and It's So Beautiful To Be Black

This staff newsletter "Black Is Beautiful, and It's So Beautiful," published by the SCLC, explains the upcoming events that the organization has in store. The newsletter communicates as to who acquired new positions within the SCLC and speaks to how the SCLC wishes to continue with projects based in Chicago, Cleveland, and Washington through Operation Breadbasket.

Black Power

This is a chapter sermon for Dr. King's book "Where Do We Go From Here?" The civil rights leader traces the early development of Black Power and its eventual surge onto the national political scene. Though understood as a direct opposition to the nonviolent movement that organizations like SCLC, CORE, and SNCC originally supported, King describes Black Power as a "disappointment wrapped in despair."

Black Power - Dr. Vincent Harding

Dr. Harding gives a full detailed presentation on Black Power before the Southeastern Regional Advisory Board of the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith.

Black Power and the American Christ

The Christian Century published this article by historian and civil rights activist Vincent Harding in its June 4, 1967 issue. In the essay, Harding, friend, associate, and speech writer for Dr. King, claims that Eurocentric Christianity antagonized the Black Power Movement.

Black Power: The Politics of Liberation in America

Stokely Carmichael and Dr. Charles Hamilton are in partnership with SNCC to promote the Black Power Movement. SNCC creates "freedom gifts" to provide the community with the expression of the "humanistic spirit" and goal of the movement. These freedom gifts range from posters, poetry, calendars, and more.

Black Power: Two Views

James Peck, a white civil rights activist, writes an article concerning the path of the Civil Rights Movement. He is beginning to notice that black power and black racism are taking over organizations that had been focused on nonviolence and racial equality.

Blue Spiral Notebook

Contained in this notebook is a draft of Dr. King's statement to Judge James E. Webb following his arrest during the Rich's Magnolia Tea Room Sit-In. There is also an outline of a letter to female students who were arrested during the sit-in. On other pages a child practices handwriting.

Board of Christian Social Concerns of the Methodist Church Concerns on Vietnam

The Board of Christian Social Concerns are troubled by the events transpiring in Vietnam. They believe that such violence cannot be God's will and offer their solutions on how to end the war. They also applaud Dr. King for his views and words concerning the war.

Book Cover Notes

These remarks about Dr. King's book, "Where Do We Go From Here?" were prepared for the cover of his book and offer a very helpful overview of the early days of Dr. King's work.

Brochure: "Some Important Fiscal Facts about the SCLC"

This document contains information about SCLC's administration, role, duties, and actions that its staff fulfills with the money donated to the organization.

Brotherhood Cannot Be a Theory

This newspaper clipping of The Southern Israelite features segments on the Atlanta banquet honoring Dr. King's acceptance of the Nobel Peace Prize. Given on his return to the States, there were twelve hundred and fifty Atlanta citizens in attendance. Included articles are: welcoming comments by Rabbi Jacob Rothschild, a tribute by Archbishop Paul Hallinan, and a transcription of Dr. King's speech.

By-Laws of the SCLC

This document outlines the by-laws of the SCLC, which includes the organization's purpose, duties and responsibilities of members, and procedures governing officers and committees. The purpose of the SCLC is to "organize and maintain Christian guidance" to aid in improving cultural conditions.

Cape Times: Dr. Luther King in Bad Company

In this Cape Times article, author J. M. Gray poses six questions to Dr. King regarding recent sightings with Communist Party members.

CBS's Face the Nation Interview

This is an official transcript of an interview on CBS's Face the Nation that focused on the Vietnam War. Dr. King explains his vision for the Civil Rights Movement and Antiwar Movements. The Great Society, Dr. King believes, is being shot down over Vietnam, as the funding for the programs are diverted to the war.

CCCO Draft Constitution

John A. McDermott, Executive Director of the Catholic Interracial Council, writes this letter to members of the Agenda Committee for the Coordinating Council of Community Organizations in Chicago. As a member of the Committee, Dr. King receives this letter urging a review of the enclosed draft of the organization's new constitution. Proposed areas of focus outline delegated staff tasks, partnership with SCLC, and broadening membership opportunities.

Chicago Defender: My Dream

Dr. King writes this article for the Chicago Defender describing the social and economic climate of Chicago's ghettos. He explains that Ghettos are the site of economic exploitation and where no exchange of culture and resources are allowed to exist. SCLC staff and Reverend James Bevel "have come to see this as a system of internal colonialism." It is understood that slum culture is designed to perpetuate the inferior educational, health, housing, and employment states of the Negro.

Pages