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Mississippi Summer Project, 1964

Associated Archive Content : 11 results

"They are Waiting for Godot in Mississippi, Too"

This article, posted in the New York Times, discusses the play, "Waiting for Godot," held by the Free Southern Theatre in Mississippi. The play focuses on racial and social issues dealing with civil rights.

American Journal: Let Justice Roll Down

Carey McWilliams writes to Dr. King to inform him his article, "Let Justice Roll Down," was included in the American Journal, a publication by the US Information Service aimed at representing opinions and current subjects of interest in the United States. This edition, published in 1965, was he 5th year in a row Dr. King had contributed an article describing the tempo of the Civil Rights Movement in the United States.

Black Power: The Politics of Liberation in America

Stokely Carmichael and Dr. Charles Hamilton are in partnership with SNCC to promote the Black Power Movement. SNCC creates "freedom gifts" to provide the community with the expression of the "humanistic spirit" and goal of the movement. These freedom gifts range from posters, poetry, calendars, and more.

Black Power: Two Views

James Peck, a white civil rights activist, writes an article concerning the path of the Civil Rights Movement. He is beginning to notice that black power and black racism are taking over organizations that had been focused on nonviolence and racial equality.

Brutality in Mississippi

This document contains two articles that reference CORE worker Scott B. Smith. Disclosing accounts of Smith's experiences in Mississippi, the articles emphasize racially charged brutality as a common occurrence.

H. Rap Brown Requests SNCC Support

The Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee's New York office of International Affairs, requests support during the August 27, 1967 boycott of General Motors. After declaring itself a Human Rights organization, SNCC requests support in the worldwide struggle for human rights, especially black liberation schools in the United States.

Letter from Jim Morton to Members of the UTC Board of Directors

Jim Morton communicates the results of the executive committee conference call in preparation for a board member conference call at a later date. The Urban Training Center for Christian Mission is dedicated to community action and supports additional organizations. The training center is attempting to input a new training program and have appointed three staff positions.

MLK Address to the Congress of Federated Organizations

Dr. King addresses the participants in the COFO Mississippi Summer Freedom Project in 1964. He pledges the full support of the SCLC to aid in their mission to register Negro voters and educate them in the process of political participation. In spite of bombings, arrests, and other forms of intimidation, Dr. King urges the members of COFO to persistently work to eliminate the roadblocks to full citizenship.

SCLC Booklet

This booklet describes the programs and actions of the SCLC. It explains why it is a movement organization as well as defining the King-Abernathy tradition.

The Free Southern Theater

The Free Southern Theater was co-founded by members of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee. They toured throughout the South, performing free of charge in Negro communities that had no theater, as a cultural and education extension of the Civil Rights Movement.

The Story of Snick

"From Freedom High to Black Power," by Gene Roberts, describes the opposing views voiced by SNCC and Dr. King regarding the civil rights movement. SNCC asserts a message of violence and black power, while Dr. King promotes a philosophy of love and nonviolence.