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Martin Luther King, Jr. - Family - Coretta Scott King

Associated Archive Content : 97 results

Letter from Coretta Scott King to Maude Ballou

Coretta Scott King offers her gratitude to Maude Ballou for her sending a form for a birth certificate.

Letter from Cummins E. Speakman to MLK

Dr. Speakman requests that Dr. King recommends the Maunaolu College of Maui to any individuals interested in coming to Hawaii.

Letter from David Morgan to Mrs. King

David Morgan writes this letter of condolence to Coretta Scott King following Dr. King's assassination.

Letter from Dora McDonald to H. L. Wynter

Ms. McDonald writes a representative of the University of the West Indies to outline details regarding Dr. King's trip to the school. She confirms that Mrs. King will be traveling with Dr. King, provides their arrival times, and requests that the university does not schedule Dr. King for any additional engagements outside of the Valedictory Sermon.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Otto Fuerbringer of Time Magazine

Dora McDonald inquires about receiving additional copies of the Time Magazine issue that featured Dr. King as the Man of the Year. She informs Otto Fuerbringer that Mrs. King's relatives in her hometown of Marion, Alabama were unable to buy copies of the magazine.

Letter from Eileen Coyne to Mrs. King

Second grader Eileen Coyne sends condolences to the King family. She and her classmates were instructed to write letters to Mrs. King to express their feelings following Dr. King's assassination. This document is a part of a collection of sixteen letters from this Bronx, New York classroom.

Letter from Emily Barton Arrabee to MLK

Ms. Arrabee sends a check to Dr. King not for the SCLC, but for Dr. and Mrs. King to use to treat themselves in some way. Arrabee suggests a book, a new record or dinner together. The check is a token of her respect and admiration for both Dr. and Mrs. King.

Letter from Eugene G. Huston to Ralph Abernathy

Mr. Huston writes to request that the photos of Mrs. King and her daughter which appear on the cover of Life Magazine, April 1968 be widely distributed. Huston believes that if this is done the larger public will be just as moved as he was and further serve to promote the memory of Dr. King.

Letter from Fran to Dr. & Mrs. King

Fran writes Dr. and Mrs. King to thank them for their hospitality during her stay at their home.

Letter from Hazel Gregory to MLK

Hazel Gregory, on behalf of the Montgomery Improvement Association, asks Dr. King about transportation to the March on Washington. She also commends him on his recent article published in "Ebony." Dr. King was president of the Montgomery Improvement Association from 1955 to 1960. The organization was founded after the arrest of Rosa Parks, which sparked the Montgomery Bus Boycott.

Letter from Helen G. Frumin to Coretta Scott King

Mrs. Frumin writes Mrs. King to request sponsorship for the Committee of Responsibility. She includes a list of others who have agreed to sponsor the organization among which is Dr. Benjamin Spock, affluent pediatrician and anti-war activist, and other prestigious figures.

Letter from Irene Harper to Dora McDonald

Irene Harper inquires of Dr. King's secretary if it would be possible to meet with the King family.

Letter from James P. Dixon of Antioch College to MLK

James P. Dixon, President of Antioch College, thanks Dr. King for accepting an invitation to speak at the school's commencement ceremony.

Letter from James R. McDowell to Mrs. King

Rev. James McDowell, Headmaster of The Lovett School in Atlanta, informs Mrs. King that the application for Martin Luther King III has been rejected. Mrs. King's application represented the first formal Negro application in the history of The Lovett School, thus the Headmaster had consulted the Board of Trustees. Upon receiving the rejection from the Trustees, McDowell returns Mrs. King's check and apologizes for any inconvenience. Attached to this set of documents is Coretta's statement regarding why she wanted her son to attend The Lovett School.

Letter from Jessie Treichler of Antioch College to Coretta Scott King

On behalf of Antioch College, Jessie Treichler invites Dr. King to speak and Mrs. King to perform at the college. She informs Mrs. King of the honorarium and requests a tentative response.

Letter from Joseph A. Scahill to Mrs. King

Following Dr. King's assassination, Minister Joseph Scahill sent this letter of sympathy to Mrs. King. Minister Scahill mentioned, briefly, his participation in the 1965 Selma campaign with Dr. King and vowed to continue such work.

Letter from Joseph S. Clark to MLK

Mr. Clark, a representative of the United States Senate, requests a written statement from Dr. King concerning a recent Bill (2993) up for election.

Letter from Leon Lowry to the King's

A. Leon Lowry invites the Kings to speak at Beulah Baptist Institutional Church in Florida for their Men's and Women's services.

Letter from Letitia Baldrige to MLK

Letitia Baldridge, Social Secretary for the White House, informs Dr. and Mrs. King of changes related to a reception with President Kennedy.

Letter from Marc de Jesus to Mrs. King

Marc de Jesus writes to Mrs. King following Dr. King's assassination.

Letter from Maude to MLK

Maude extends her wishes for the rapid recovery of Dr. King, following a stabbing in New York. She assures him that she is holding down the fort and provides him with a breakdown of correspondences that he has received.

Letter from Miss Shirley Wright to Mrs. King

Mrs. King writes Shirley Wright of the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee, thanking her for the copy of the "We Shall Overcome" record.

Letter from MLK to C. B. King

Dr. King thanks C. B. King for a recent contribution and tells him that the widespread, articulate opposition to the war in Vietnam is unprecedented in American history.

Letter from MLK to Coretta Scott King

In an intimate letter to Mrs. King, Dr. King informs her of his recent arrival to the State Prison in Reidsville, Georgia. He urges her "to be strong in faith" as she is also pregnant with their third child at the time. He expresses his hope for a family visit that coming Sunday, and his desire to remain intellectually engaged during his four-month sentence.

Letter from MLK to Emily Barton Anable

Dr. King thanks Mrs. Anable for her kind letter and financial gift. Mrs. King asked him to let her know the money will be used to purchase something for the new baby. At the time of the letter's writing, Dr. and Mrs. King were expecting their fourth child, Bernce.

Letter from MLK to Jessie Treichler

Dr. King writes Jessie Tresichler to inform her that he and his wife will be unable to accept her invitation to Antioch College. He explains that his calendar will not allow him to accept any more speaking engagements and that Coretta is an expecting mother.

Letter from MLK to Reverend Irvin G. Perkins

Dr. King informs Rev. Perkins that he will not be available to preach at Donlands United Church in Toronto. Dr. King also writes that Mrs. King thoroughly enjoyed her visit to Toronto.

Letter from Mrs. Forest Dana to MLK

Mrs. Forest Dana writes Dr. King to express her displeasure in his outspoken stance against the Vietnam War. She acknowledges the withdrawal of her support and feels that he has done a disservice to Negroes in America. She believes he should focus on civil rights and not interfere with the war.

Letter from Mrs. George E. Bass to MLK

The President of the Planned Parenthood Association of Philadelphia expresses disappointment to Dr. King regarding his inability to personally accept the Margret Sanger Award in Human Rights. However, she states that Mrs. King was "a most eloquent substitute." Additionally, she reiterates a request for Dr. King to speak at the Philadelphia Planned Parenthood Association's Annual Luncheon on January 25, 1967.

Letter from Mrs. Joan Kimmey to Coretta Scott King

On behalf of the Baha'is in Teaneck, New Jersey, this letter offers condolences to Mrs. King for the recent assassination of her husband, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Heartfelt sentiments express admiration for Dr. King's vision, dedication, and teachings.

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